Ram
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Thread: Ram

  1. #1
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    Ram

    I have a few questions regarding RAM:

    1.) What are the different kinds of RAM(DDR, rambus, etc)

    2.) How do they work?

    3.) What are the pros/cons of each?

    4.) Would it be possible/beneficial to combine any of the types together?

    TIA for everything.
    Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive (the dang thing blew up)

    \"Ask not what the kernel can do for you, ask what you can do for the kernel!\"
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  2. #2
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    Talking RAM Question

    Hello Everyone,

    Ah..It's that time... Thanksgiving! ... Good Food...Family...but also time off .... Anyways:

    How are you doing Kezil?

    Here is a good resource for you...It should help you in learning more about RAM!

    Kingston has a VERY nice guide on RAM which should answer all your questions. They have an online version and even a downloadable PDF version:

    http://www.kingston.com/tools/umg/default.asp

    Have fun...Happy Reading...and I hope this has helped you
    Simon Templer

    \"Your work is to discover your world and then with all your heart give yourself to it. \"
    -The Buddha
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  3. #3
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    Also check out http://www.crucial.com they are the #1 producer of RAM in the world at the moment. (Crucial is Micron)

    Quick and dirty:
    DDR = Double Data Rate RAM aka PC2100 184 pin 266MHz bus
    SDRAM = aka PC133 (most commonly now) 168 pin 133MHz bus
    RAM Bus = is an interesting concept and I hope it takes off, theoretic "no-cap" on bus speed. Not yet capable of delivering full potential due to current Mother Board bus speeds.

    Read the white papers from both of these sites for the technical specifics. Also any good A+ Cert. type book will get you going on all of the different types of RAM.

    No, you can not mix the types of RAM. Even on a Motherboard like mine (Asus A7A 266MHz) that has both SDRAM and DDR DIMM slots, you can only run one or the other. The same is true of any other configuration that I am aware of.

    SDRAM is available for both Pentium Motherboards and AMD Motherboards. DDR is limited to AMD boards for the moment, but some Pentium boars that can use DDR are coming soon. As for RAMBUS I don't really know, but it seems to be limited to Pentium boards for the moment.

    *imho* DDR is currently the champ in RAM performance. This may/may not change as bus speeds increase to levels where RAMBUS is supposed to be superior (this is all still theory though)
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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  4. #4
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    clarification

    Let me clarify what I meant by mixing ram types. What I meant was could a single ram chip be designed that used a composite of ram types, taking the advantages of both/each type. Perhaps one that used a better type in one case, and the other in a case in which it would work better, or some variation on this. I think you get the point.

    btw, thanks for the links, Happy and filling Thanksgiving to all, and what is A+ cert? I've heard of it before, but don't know what it is.
    Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive (the dang thing blew up)

    \"Ask not what the kernel can do for you, ask what you can do for the kernel!\"
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  5. #5
    ironically.. Today I have seen the wierdest ram..



    It goes into some sort of server.

    and its shaped like an arch.. much like a rainbow or something like that

    it plugs into this sphere thing.. i dont get it.. n e 1 know n e thing about this
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  6. #6
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    Happy ThanksGiving to everybody :D

    Your question about combining the different types of RAM is a very interesting one.

    As you probably know, what determines the type of RAM is it all starts at the beginning when it is still a silicon wafer. The dye of these inidividual chips keep shrinking and despite their smaller size are able to store more data, and return the data correctly at ever increasing speeds.

    The short answer to your question is `I think so'. At the design level, there is huge competition between those companies involved with RAMBUS and those involved with DDR. My guess, if I were forced to make one would be that before RAMBUS really takes off and sees it's full potential the DDR folks will have incorporated it into their design to negate the competition. (RAM producers stay in business and average of 6 years, very competitive business).

    From an engineering standpoint I really don't see any reason why what you are suggesting would not be possible.

    Happy ThanksGiving!
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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  7. #7
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    Sorry, forgot to answer your A+ question

    A+ is a certification that essentially makes you a `PC' hardware expert. It covers all aspects of PC hardware in great detail.

    CompTIA is currently the leader (and author?) of the A+ cert track. http://www.comptia.org/certification/ ofcourse they offer some other really neat'O certifications as well.

    A good book (bigger than a telephone book and twice as heavy) on the subject is Scott Mueller's 'Upgrading and Repairing PC's, Linux Edition' published by QUE ISBN 0-7897-2075-2. There is a non-Linux Edition that is essentially the same thing. The Linux Edition is more recent, and the only thing that makes it a `Linux Edition' is a pretty in-depth discussion about *nix partitioning in the rear of the book.

    I personally think anyone interested in PC hardware should give the A+ study materials a look.

    Two great web sites that are totally up on new PC hardware and give details in the extreme are http://www.tomshardware.com/ and http://www.sharkyextreme.com/

    Hope this helped
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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  8. #8
    hehbris
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    ironically.. Today I have seen the wierdest ram..
    how is this irony?

    A+ certification is a joke and a waste of money. If you feel the need to certify yourself as technical support then go for it, but in most cases all that is required is an elementary school diploma.
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  9. #9
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    Oh my god! I agree with hehbris! WHAT'S HAPPENING TO ME!?

    I have to say that I have seen some really computer stupid people who were A+ certified. They went in knowing nothing, and came out knowing how to sling computer jargon around. I'm not saying that A+ certification is a waste of time, as it's a nice addition to a resume, but I have seen some people come out of A+ certification that were miles behind me, and I'm not an IT tech. I still say there is no better teacher out there than experience.
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  10. #10
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    Kezil asked: what is A+ cert? I've heard of it before, but don't know what it is.

    And I replied (short version): a PC hardware knowledge/repair cert.

    Key point: I personally think anyone interested in PC hardware should give the `A+ study materials' a look.

    I would agree with both of you about the A+ cert that it is a good thing to *study*, but it will just frustrate you if you get the certification as a means of securing a good computer job. I would add to that the MCSE and MCSD cert's as well. They both come in the same two flavors: IT or programming wizards who got the cert to add to their resume in addition to an education and some experience. And people who knew next to nothing before taking the respective cert track, and don't know a whole lot more afterwards.

    All the negative things you can say about the more popular certs aside, the study materials are excellent and will help just about anyone learn more than they already know.
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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