RH 7.1 shutdown issue
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Thread: RH 7.1 shutdown issue

  1. #1
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    RH 7.1 shutdown issue

    I did a quick google search but didnt find an easy answer to this problem....

    If I am logged in to my RH 7.1 machine in X, KDE, and I choose logout, I get back to the login prompt. On the login prompt, there is a shutdown button, if I choose shutdown and the select the shutdown option(instead of reboot) It restarts the X server, IF I choose shutdown again it will finally shutdown.

    Any one seen this before?

    Thanks,

    IchNiSan
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  2. #2
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    don't really know, could just be an error in the windowmanager... but why do u log out before u reboot? there's no need to do that.
    The shutdown thing could maybe be caused if the useraccount u normally use when running linux doesn't have the privilige to shutdown the machine... log in as root and the user settings.
    zion1459
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  3. #3
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Talking

    Hrmmm. Could be that. Don't log in as root. Do an su - to switch to root at a terminal window and then do either a shutdown "now" or power off. Either of those would be preferable.
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  4. #4
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    hmm... now why didnt I think of that.

    I am logging in a "normal" user, no special privledges at all.. I guess I just didnt think of opening a console and shutting down as su.

    Thanks,

    IchNiSan
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  5. #5
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    Are you using `kdm' or `gdm'? I believe that both of these have settings to the effect of controlling if/whch users can halt or reboot the system. You may want to look into how `kdm' or `gdm' (whichever you are using) is configured in this respect.

    A couple of other commands to add to MsMittens suggestiona are:

    shutdown -h now /* halts the system */

    shutdown -r now /* reboots the system */

    reboot /* you guessed it */


    have a look at `man shutdown' for more spiffy options.
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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  6. #6
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    Thanks people.

    One funny thing.

    I was logged in as a user...

    opened a bash shell, switched to super user

    typed

    shutdown now

    and it shutdown the gui, and brought me to a command line....

    I waited a while,,, then typed

    shutdown now

    and it after some scrolling text, it brought me to another command line, labelled single user mode.

    so, I typed it one more time... and it worked...

    heh.. maybe something wrong with my install?

    well, thanks for info, I think I will live with it.

    IchNiSan
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  7. #7
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    Red Hat uses Sys V init scripts. Sys V init scripts define 6 different run levels. Each run level brings up or shuts down services depending on what the run level does for the system ( example 6 does a shutdown on all processes and services on it's way to system halt)

    It sounds as if just issuing `shutdown now' is kicking you down to the next run level (6 ==> reboot, 5 multiuser ==>, 3 text multiuser ==>, 1 single user ==>, 0 shutdown). This can be configured in more detail via `linuxconf' or /etc/rc.d where you can control what happens in each run level.

    /* it is a possibilty that you have an alias defined in root's .bashrc that is causing this behavior, try commenting it out if it's there and you don't want it . look for something like
    alias shoutdown=' value '
    */

    Until you figure out why 'shutdown now' just bumps you to the next lower run level, try issuing a more defined command like 'shutdown -h now' to shutdown the system.
    Know this..., you may not by thyself in pride claim the Mantle of Wizardry; that way lies only Bogosity without End.

    Rather must you Become, and Become, and Become, until Hackers respect thy Power, and other Wizards hail thee as a Brother or Sister in Wisdom, and you wake up and realize that the Mantle hath lain unknown upon thy Shoulders since you knew not when.

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  8. #8
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    you could type:

    init 0

    to initialise runlevel 0 (system halt)
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