NEWS: Thirty Nations agree with Cybercrime Treaty.
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  1. #1

    NEWS: Thirty Nations agree with Cybercrime Treaty.

    Thirty Nations Sign Cybercrime Treaty
    Pact aims at harmonizing computer crime laws and streamlining investigations worldwide
    By Brian Krebs, Newsbytes
    Nov 26 2001 9:10AM PT

    The United States and 29 other nations signed a treaty last Friday establishing common tools and rules for fighting Internet crime.

    On Nov. 23, foreign ministers from the United States, Canada, Japan and South Africa joined their counterparts in 26 other countries in signing the Council of Europe's "Convention on Cybercrime," an international treaty designed to harmonize laws and penalties for crimes committed via the Internet.

    The convention streamlines definitions and civil and criminal penalties for hacking, copyright infringement, computer-related fraud, and child pornography.

    The treaty also includes provisions added in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks that give member states common powers to search and intercept the Internet communications of suspected terrorists.

    The treaty will go into force as soon as five member states have ratified it; three of them must be Council of Europe members. The treaty still must be approved by the U.S. Senate before it takes effect in the United States.

    Later this week, all 15 European Union states are expected to introduce a proposal to ratify the core elements of the treaty. The EU hopes to complete the ratification process by June 30, 2003.

    The Council of Europe's cybercrime treaty has steadily earned criticism from consumer and civil liberties groups concerned that the convention could lead to the emergence of an international electronic surveillance network, or a kind of global "Big Brother."

    Specifically, critics allege that U.S. law-enforcement agencies will use the treaty as an end-run around U.S. surveillance laws, and as a way to obtain the kinds of powers not granted in new U.S. anti-terrorism legislation signed into law last month.

    First Amendment groups also are worried about the implications of a supplemental protocol that will soon be added to the agreement that makes any Internet publication of racist or xenophobic material a criminal offense.

    Speaking on the eve of the signing ceremony in Brussels last week, the Council of Europe's Legal Director Guy de Vel countered those claims, saying the treaty strikes "a precious balance between the requirements of criminal investigations and respect for individual rights."

    De Vel also said he remains mystified about allegations that the treaty might compromise civil rights.

    "When I read the text of the convention, I still find it difficult to understand why these accusations were made," he said. "It is possible that the true motivations of the draft were, unfortunately, not always properly understood."

    Other nations that signed the treaty include: Albania, Armenia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, "the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia," Ukraine and the United Kingdom.
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  2. #2
    Specifically, critics allege that U.S. law-enforcement agencies will use the treaty as an end-run around U.S. surveillance laws, and as a way to obtain the kinds of powers not granted in new U.S. anti-terrorism legislation signed into law last month.
    Well who saw this comming? lol. I kicked my country for this one.


    (in reply to my last thread)
    Well I'm going through mega withdrawls from not smoking, lol,
    Just to let you guys know, you all rock. Thanks !
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  3. #3
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    Glad your back with the news, freeOn. Hope the withdrawls cool down.

    Government shouldn't be allowed to make any new laws. We have enough and these newest are just pinning us down.
    Why am I still here?
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  4. #4
    Token drunken Irish guy
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    Nice bit of news, glad to see the bulletins are back FreeOn, Im a smoker dude but I cant see myself giving them up I have no will power!"
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  5. #5
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    hehe

    glad to see australia hasnt signed lol
    i gave up smoking but replaced it with another computers and never looked back
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  6. #6
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    I doubt Australia would sign up...
    I mean, the Australian government really has no idea about technology, and from what I've seen really don't consider it that important for some reason....


    and besides.. Australia commit to something.. pffffff

    -=-
    Australian & Proud of It..
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"
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  7. #7
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    true

    australia is quite lame when it comes to technolagy i mean cable isnt even mainstream like as my understanding it is in the us?? please tell me if im wrong the adsl network isnt strong yet and adsl and uptime are things never heard in the same sentance. gateway pulling out of australia is anothe prime example.
    all aussie hackers,security or phreakers i think we need to rebuild our lost art.
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  8. #8
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    true

    australia is quite lame when it comes to technolagy i mean cable isnt even mainstream like as my understanding it is in the us?? please tell me if im wrong the adsl network isnt strong yet and adsl and uptime are things never heard in the same sentance. gateway pulling out of australia is anothe prime example.
    all aussie hackers,security or phreakers i think we need to rebuild our lost art.
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  9. #9
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    Re: true

    Originally posted by RiOtEr
    cable isnt even mainstream like as my understanding it is in the us?? please tell me if im wrong the adsl network isnt strong yet and adsl and uptime are things never heard in the same sentance.
    I've heard about this, too. Big european cable network UPC tried to get market shares in Australia a few years ago, providing broadband to the mainstream. Finally they found out that the exsisting infrastructure in Australia is too weak to provide 100% uptime. They tried to make use of sattelite dishes, but it turned out to be a totale waste of money. Also, the Autralien connection to the worldwide backbone network is not very good. Seems you guys gotta take the power back!

    Anyway, Australien univeristies have a good reputation. I'm going to the university of Melbourne in about a year.
    From what I've heard it's excellent!
    ---
    proactive
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  10. #10
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    hehe

    yeh its pretty bad
    i live about 5 mins from a fairly major town but i can get no broadband cause cable isnt layed down here adsl neither. satelite nope to many trees so im pretty stuck with dialup for a while
    yeh im going to wolllongon uni when i finish shcool supposed to be the best for comp science so well see sooon enough
    but im still anoyed at our lack of technology i thnk we should all complain to telstra or whoever
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