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Thread: Linux

  1. #1
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    Linux

    I have two questions about Redhat Linux 7.1:

    1. What would you suggest for the levels of install? i.e., what would be a good minimum install, medium install, newbie install, etc. (feel free to make up any type you wish, I'm interested in all)

    2. What would be the system requirements for the install?

    Thanks for all.
    Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive (the dang thing blew up)

    \"Ask not what the kernel can do for you, ask what you can do for the kernel!\"
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  2. #2
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Talking

    Ive installed RH 7.1 on a Pentium 100 with 64MB and used about 675MB of space. I've had students install 7.0 on a 486 with 8MB of RAM and I think a 500MB HD.

    As for what you install, that depends on what you want to do with it. What do you want to do with the box?

    Hope this helps.
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
    Extra! Extra! Get your FREE copy of Insight Newsletter||MsMittens' HomePage
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  3. #3
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    hmm,

    If you are new to linux, and just want to explore. With as many options as possible. I would do a custom install, and select the INSTALL EVERYTHING box when it asks you about packages. This will take up (accross all partitions, and I am guessing from my memory of the times I did it) a bit less than 3 gigs. most of this in your /usr directory, so make sure that that partition is pretty big.

    Having said that, I am about at the point of wiping my machine, performing a bare bones install, with X and a browser, the kernel and regular development tools. Once I have that system up, I will install the latest versions from the web of only the packages that I need/want as I go.

    Not sure if this is a good idea or not, but... I think I am going to do it, as I have no idea what half of the apps on my machine are, and certainly never use them.

    Good luck, and have fun.

    Some good resources are at..

    www.linuxnewbie.org

    Also check out MsMittens Tut in the Tutorial forum on installing linux.

    IchNiSan
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  4. #4
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    Use

    As in the main, I'm interested in about any use you can come up with, but mostly, since this will be the first time I've used Linux, a newbie install, and an install for an advanced user for when I become capable at it.
    Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive (the dang thing blew up)

    \"Ask not what the kernel can do for you, ask what you can do for the kernel!\"
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  5. #5
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    One way to go about it (certainly not the best or only way) is to pick one of the default spiffy installs like workstation or something. This will get you just about all the stuff you need to do whatever you do in windows. One of the things about Linux apps is that in many cases there are like 12 or more things that do the same thing ( and all 12 may come with your Distro) this is where some real experimentation comes into play.

    I think after using Linux for about a year you will be able to chuck an install disk into your drive and know exactly what you want/need and what you don't. This is such a personal choice, so have fun and read the docs on your apps so you understand *what* they can do.

    example: vi or Emacs? this qustion is like Pepsi or Coke in the *nix world and you won't really know until you learn how to use both.

    have fun, need any help just ask

    P.S. I am a vi man myself
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  6. #6
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    Addition:

    Additional question:

    what are the different GUIs (mainly the one(s) that come with redhat, but others also) and Good points/Bad points of each?
    Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive (the dang thing blew up)

    \"Ask not what the kernel can do for you, ask what you can do for the kernel!\"
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  7. #7
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    The big 3 are KDE, GNOME, and FVWM.

    KDE and GNOME seems to be the ones that most people really like. It may even be a good idea to install both and try them out. The reasons people like each one are usually pretty specific so it would not be fair for me to comment on strengths and weaknesses of each.

    FVWM is not generaly one that many people like.
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  8. #8

    Post LINUX OS

    I have had two ver. of suse running on redhat at the same time

    My maths teacher helped, along also a Cambridge Maths teacher.
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  9. #9
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    I have had two ver. of suse running on redhat at the same time
    When you say "running on red hat" - what exactly do you mean?

    The big 3 are KDE, GNOME, and FVWM.
    I was under the impression that gnome wasn't really a window manager, moreover a framework that holds everything together, and you use different windowmanagers, like sawmill, enlightenment, icewm on top of gnome (or on top of the kde base for that matter) - is this not the case?
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  10. #10
    Fastest Thing Alive s0nIc's Avatar
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    K-D-E! K-D-E!!! K-D-E!!!


    use KDE!!!

    hahaha
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