Twenty Most Critical Internet Security Vulnerabilities - Page 2
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Thread: Twenty Most Critical Internet Security Vulnerabilities

  1. #11
    PHP/PostgreSQL guy
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    Dec 2001
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    Post Agreed

    Most NT "sysadmins" I know are a bunch of numbered toads who give up at the first sign of resistance. It doesn't help with me over there ragging on them by saying things like "See, if it were Open Source, I could figure out a fix" or "You know, perl is much better for that" or "Imagine that, my linux kernel runs perfectly fine with 64 megs of ram, yet your massive NT server running IIS 5 (laughable joke) runs out of 2 gigs of ram?"...

    MS doesn't 'breed' sysadmins, they send them to 2 week crash courses! MCSE rarely ever means anything unless you happen to run into one who really does know what they're talking about...and if that happens, listen for the twilight zone music.

    Yes, I'm a unix/linux/opensource bigot...
    We the willing, led by the unknowing, have been doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to do just about anything with almost nothing.

  2. #12
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by ThePreacher
    The #1 security vulnerability in networks is:

    IGNORANCE
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The #1 security exploit for this vulnerability in networks is:

    Reverse Enginereing
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Remote_Access_

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    I'd agree with ThePreacher that the number 1 security vulnerability is ignorance, as if you didn't have the stupid ignorant users, then reverse engineering wouldn't work that well...
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    257

    Re: Agreed

    Originally posted by Vorlin
    Most NT "sysadmins" I know are a bunch of numbered toads who give up at the first sign of resistance. It doesn't help with me over there ragging on them by saying things like "See, if it were Open Source, I could figure out a fix" or "You know, perl is much better for that" or "Imagine that, my linux kernel runs perfectly fine with 64 megs of ram, yet your massive NT server running IIS 5 (laughable joke) runs out of 2 gigs of ram?"...

    MS doesn't 'breed' sysadmins, they send them to 2 week crash courses! MCSE rarely ever means anything unless you happen to run into one who really does know what they're talking about...and if that happens, listen for the twilight zone music.

    Yes, I'm a unix/linux/opensource bigot...
    Well, since I'm an administrator for a mostly microsoft network(7 nt severs, 3 netware, 2 linux, 2 unix), I figure I should defend us. Besides, I can't just give up like a numbered toad.

    To start out I guess I'll just point out your exaggeration, my iis machine has 265 meg of RAM and I've never seen the usage above 15-20%(it also hosts AD information, though it's in no way related to the directory information for my internal network, this is also the only microsoft box that is in the DMZ). Without creating an intentional memory leak, I don't know how I could possibly use up 2 gig of RAM.

    These 2 week crash courses are not designed to turn a layperson into a sys admin. They're designed to teach sys admins how microsoft networking services are used. Anyone who takes these courses without any background knowledge will probably not pass the MCSE exams, and if they do, their inadequate knowledge will quickly be apparent at any job they get.

    Why use microsoft? Simple, every user has a microsoft OS of some version, and there are simply too many users to manage them all without a point for central management. Is it possible to create a linux or other opensource OS that can manage all of these machines? Possibly, but will it be as efficient or worth the time? Probably not. Maybe they'll let me roll out linux to the users, yeah, that'll be the day.

  5. #15
    AntiOnline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    514

    Re: #1

    Originally posted by ThePreacher
    The #1 security vulnerability in networks is:

    IGNORANCE
    Bingo!

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