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  1. #11
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    Read below....
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?
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  2. #12
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    You're right tedob, there IS a way to prevent access to the dos prompt in the policy editor.

    BTW, it's all alot easier than you are all thinking. If a user is able to run command.com, then all he/she has to do is create a shortcut to it.

    No need to make a batch file or anything.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?
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  3. #13
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    In addition, some Windows versions offer help menus for the old file manager. This is the case with NT4.0. Although not a dos prompt, it is a very effective dos shell that is available even if policies are prohibiting a dos prompt.
    I have never had any problem deleting winfile.exe as one more hole plugged.
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  4. #14
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    Cool

    So, basically the quickest way (if it's there) is fastfind? Just a thought. Also, The Microsoft BackOffice 4.0 Setup utility creates a file called
    REBOOT.INI in the

    \Program Files\Microsoft BackOffice

    directory which contains plaintext userIDs and Passwords for, at least,
    the SQL Executive Logon account, the Exchange Services Account, and the
    MTS Remote Administration Account, if supplied during BackOffice Setup.
    Other user account passwords may be recorded in this file during setup
    [glowpurple]Outside of a dog, a book is man\'s best friend...[/glowpurple] [gloworange]inside of a dog, it\'s too dark to read...- [/gloworange] [shadow]Groucho Marx[/shadow]
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  5. #15
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    In addition, some Windows versions offer help menus for the old file manager. This is the case with NT4.0. Although not a dos prompt, it is a very effective dos shell that is available even if policies are prohibiting a dos prompt.
    I have never had any problem deleting winfile.exe as one more hole plugged.
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  6. #16
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    Cool

    Good call Vaness! Btw, this is the rest of the text..this was actually in our text files, so it's paste...give it up where it's due, right? Anywho, for not wanting to re-write the bible, here it is:Hope this is useful to all.
    [glowpurple]Outside of a dog, a book is man\'s best friend...[/glowpurple] [gloworange]inside of a dog, it\'s too dark to read...- [/gloworange] [shadow]Groucho Marx[/shadow]
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  7. #17
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    This may sound like a bit of a Troll answer, but maybe you should consider upgrading to Windows 2000 if you are so worried about security. There will always be ways for users to get around anything you do in Windows 9x cause there is no real file security. If you upgrade to 2000, however, you will be able to limit the user's access to only certain files that they need and no more, plus Active Directory gives you a TON of options on how to get rid of stuff from their PCs that you probably don't want them messing with. All this while still allowing you to logon as an administrator and perform your duties.

    I suggest seriously looking into the Win 2k upgrades, I'm telling you there is no way you'll stop an intelligent person from messing with files on a Windows 9x PC.

    -Wizeman
    \"It\'s only arrogrance if you can\'t back it up, otherwise it is confidence.\" - Me
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  8. #18
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    Originally posted by Wizeman
    but maybe you should consider upgrading to Windows 2000 if you are so worried about security.
    No install *nix if you want REAL security.
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  9. #19
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    I'm certainly not going to get into a flame war about which is better, a *nix or Windows 2000, but I'm going to say that in this particular case students need to use these PCs, they obviously have an existing Windows-based infrastructure, and Windows can be secured very well if you are knowledgable enough about it (go look for the Windows 2000 security guide on www.nsa.gov). Given that the students probably have no experience with *nix, that the programs they use probably aren't ported to *nix, and that they don't want to spend lots of $$ doing a complete infrastructure switch-over, then I would say that Windows 2000 is the best solution for what he is looking for. Besides, as far as file security goes, Windows and *nix uses the same principals (groups and users).
    \"It\'s only arrogrance if you can\'t back it up, otherwise it is confidence.\" - Me
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  10. #20
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    I would have to agree that if you want to protect the computer from somebody sitting at the terminal, any DOS-based OS is not going to cut it. Since there is no file level security, there will always be a way to get at files, unless you've gone so far as to make the operating system unusable.
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