Best Linux......
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Thread: Best Linux......

  1. #1
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    Question Best Linux......

    Which is the best linux box?
    i just wanna know it bcoz i have RH 7.1,Caldera's open linux,SuSe

    with me.which one is the best to use,which crashes less and with minium bugs.

    What about Solaris?

    How can i prevent RH 7.1 from crashing often(i mean it checks filesystems even if i shut down properly)?also my linux dosen't detect sound onboard.how do i resolve it?
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  2. #2
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    BSD has way less more security issues, even on default install; and has tcp/ip stack.
    as far as linux goes redhat is easy for beginners. and id say the same with mandrake.
    i think mandrake gets the more current drivers for hardware before other versions.
    solairs seems to be good for stabilty and security thats what the NSA uses
    I've got Suse 7.3 now, and ill probably be upgrading to freebsd soon.
    Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. - Theodore Roosevelt
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  3. #3
    Senior since the 3 dot era
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    Post versions

    Try to use versions with even numbers (if possible / available)

    x.0 = new version
    x.1 = major imporvements (public version)
    x.2 = corrected, stable version
    x.2.1 = small improvements
    x.2.2 = small improvements debugged
    ...
    You get the picture?
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  4. #4
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    Best Linux...... << They are all good, but imho Slackware is 133t

    Which is the best linux box?
    i just wanna know it bcoz i have RH 7.1,Caldera's open linux,SuSe.
    << These are all Linux. Keep in mind that the only thing that makes these Distro's different really is the configuration menu's that they use to try and out do each other in the `User Friendly' area. Do yourself a favor and just install any of them and learn how to do things the 'Linux Hacker Way' by which I mean edit the config scripts and such manually. If you know the command line, how to read man pages, and related Unix skills, you will be able to work at the same level of experitse on any *nix flavor.

    with me.which one is the best to use,which crashes less and with minium bugs.

    << All of these are not only Linux, but they are each quite stable. If you are having crashing problems, the system is misconfigured. Red Hat has had the most security issues because they occassionaly package software that is a little more bleeding edge and is for all intents and purposes BETA. However, they also support their product very well and have updates and bug fixes very frequently (read *constantly*.)

    What about Solaris? << Solaris is not Linux, it is a proprietary Unix offered by Sun Microsystems.

    How can i prevent RH 7.1 from crashing often(i mean it checks filesystems even if i shut down properly)?also my linux dosen't detect sound onboard.how do i resolve it? << reinstall the system. If the issue persists, email me with the exact message the kernel is giving on boot and shutdown, or post it or whatever and I will try and give you an idea of what is causing the issue and how to fix it.

    Your sound card must be set up before using it. RH has their own tool for doing this called sndconfig. As root or su type sndconfig at a prompt and follow the instructions in the menu. Same as above if this does not work let me know and I will try and help you.


    dolemite wrote:
    BSD has way less more security issues, even on default install; and has tcp/ip stack.
    as far as linux goes redhat is easy for beginners. and id say the same with mandrake.
    i think mandrake gets the more current drivers for hardware before other versions.
    solairs seems to be good for stabilty and security thats what the NSA uses
    I've got Suse 7.3 now, and ill probably be upgrading to freebsd soon.
    << I may have misunderstood what you meant, but Linux has a tcp/ip stack as well, in fact it is a slightly modified version of the same tcp/ip stack used in all *BSD Unix builds.

    Once again I may have misunderstood you and I may be accused of rambling here. The BSD's are not Linux. They are BSD Unix. If you install one of these systems you will find that out very quickly. Of course they are more alike than they are different, but there are still some pretty major differences, the kernel being the BIG one.

    I have to agree that Open/Free/NetBSD are more secure than Linux. In particular OpenBSD, is very secure. The default install of OpenBSD has not had a remotely exploitable security hole for over 4 years now. That, is pretty damn secure if you ask me.

    As for the NSA using Solaris, I think you will find that all or nearly all Us Government sites use Solaris. They made a deal with the devil...ummmm... I mean Sun Microsystems a few years back and have been running Sun Hardware and OS's for a while now. Don't get me wrong, Solaris is really very good, but I have creative differences with Sun, and besides the Open Source BSD Unix flavors are better and more secure. btw check out http://www.netcraft.com if you are ever curious what a site runs.
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  5. #5
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    yeah
    don't me wrong any version of unix/linux is good
    i was rambling a lil myself
    some gov't sites use *nix version like zenith and the dec and aix(which is actually at&ts and where unix came from) which is a level 2 or sumin
    very secure i really doubt this is commmercially available for the public
    but my points is off couse linux version have tcp/ip stack or i wouldnt be here
    my point was it has a better stack than other *nix and it surely kicks windows stack in the ass badddd
    but they have a different file system somewhat per se as do most unix/linux versions config files and such are placed differenet places
    and yuh the kernels are different from every version as its configured from your hardware and your os
    and yuh i do agree openbsd are way more secure and ill probably be using it soon
    seeeee
    im still rambling
    Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. - Theodore Roosevelt
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  6. #6
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    All of the aforementioned is correct and I'll add a little more information so you can choose:

    1: Redhat (linux, currently at 7.1, prerelease of 7.2,using the 2.4 kernel)...this is the only commercial linux that's 'in the black' (meaning they make a profit). It's easy to configure both with text and gui installs and a complete newbie could install it easily. Recommended for beginners. Good RPM based system so installing patched programs from redhat.com is easy.

    2: Caldera/Mandrake - these are versions that run under the same RPM system that Redhat had. Caldera used to be part of Redhat but they wanted to do their own thing so they split amicably. I wouldn't imagine there's much of a difference.

    3: *BSD - this is the most 'unix' of all mentioned before. BSD ran parallel with unix's progression throughout the years and has the most unix-like features. It also had a very wide support base and is more secure "out of the box" than the linuxes (although they're following suit on a lot of things, like 7.1 disabling telnet/ftp in an install) BUT it's also requires a lot more knowledge than the linuxes because it's not easy to learn. Even casual BSD users find some things not very easy (spoken by my BSD lovin' boss who was a unix admin of 12 years).

    Recommended path: find one you like, learn the most you can about securing it from various sites, and run it till the wheels fall off! Anything can be secure in the hands of a competent admin.

    Hope this helps!
    We the willing, led by the unknowing, have been doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to do just about anything with almost nothing.
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  7. #7
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    1: Redhat (linux, currently at 7.1, prerelease of 7.2,using the 2.4 kernel)...this is the only commercial linux that's 'in the black' (meaning they make a profit). It's easy to configure both with text and gui installs and a complete newbie could install it easily. Recommended for beginners. Good RPM based system so installing patched programs from redhat.com is easy.

    2: Caldera/Mandrake - these are versions that run under the same RPM system that Redhat had. Caldera used to be part of Redhat but they wanted to do their own thing so they split amicably. I wouldn't imagine there's much of a difference.
    I don't think Caldera broke away from Redhat. I DO know that Mandrake did, however. I also think that all of the major distributions make some sort of profit (or they would go belly up!)

    If you are a newbie and want something easy, try Mandrake. It's installation process isn't bad. If you want to get really intimate with your system, try Slakware. It makes you do most of the configurations by hacking the config files by hand (no nifty scripts to do it and not tell you what they changed.)

    If you are super gutsy, try OpenBSD (or FreeBSD, they each have strong points) Or if you are on a platform other than an Intel clone, try NetBSD (it has more support for other platforms)


    How can i prevent RH 7.1 from crashing often(i mean it checks filesystems even if i shut down properly)?also my linux dosen't detect sound onboard.how do i resolve it?
    On my Mandrake box, the only time it checks the filesystem after proper shutdown is when the inode table is full. (usually when I have recently installed a lot of stuff, then deleted a lot of other stuff) I think it is just periodic maintenance on the system.
    Good luck on finding a system you enjoy.

    Happy Hacking
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Warfare is the Way of deception.
    -Sun Tzu \"The Art of War\"
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  8. #8
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    Here's an interesting point of view - http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/23245.html
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