Bypassing On-board SoundCard
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Thread: Bypassing On-board SoundCard

  1. #1

    Bypassing On-board SoundCard

    First of all, thanks to all that chipped in their 2 cents worth involving the automatic rebooting problem. I still haven't figured out what the problem is, or where it's coming from, but from the responses, I now know a little more.

    Now, on another subject, sound cards. My sound card is on-board my motherboard and so I was wondering, if/when I purchase a new soundcard, will I need to figure out a way to bypass the on-board one, or will it automatically read the new one?

    I'm not too knowledgable on the whole BIOS issue. My friends have instructed me to go into the BIOS and disable the sound there. I'm a little timid about going into the BIOS, seeing how if I make a mistake, uh oh! So, if any of you have any more "change" (2 cents-for the ones that didn't get that) I would appreciate some help. I use Phoenix BIOS.

    Thanks again..
    ...the scent of your hair as you twirl in your fingers, and the time on the clock, when we realized that it\'s so late, and this walk that we shared....together!
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  2. #2
    Fastest Thing Alive s0nIc's Avatar
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    Cool It doesnt matter

    yeah well here's what u do.. uninstall your old integrated sound card and install your new one..

    either that or your system will recognize both sound cards and you can have an option on which one you want to use..

    if u installed your new sound card, it will display in your Device Manager that you have two sound cards.. it doesnt matter really.. its same logic as using 2 Ethernet adapters..
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  3. #3
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    It can matter in some instances, as the inbuilt one can interfere with the new card..

    Have a look at your motherboard manual.. It should have something about disabling it... you'll probably just have to switch some jumpers or something...
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"
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  4. #4
    Senior since the 3 dot era
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    Before you change some hardware like disabling the sound card with a jumper or from in the BIOS first make sure you deinstalled it in Windows otherwise your windows become unstable. Oh it already was? get Linux. (just kidding)

    The phoenix Bios isn't realy that difficult.

    Check the Onboard perhipherals and set onboard sound chip to disbabled.

    So that is what you have to do when you doesn't like having 2 soundcards in your system. Although 2 soundcards could be amusing when you use some studioprogs and things like that.
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  5. #5
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    What these guys/gals/others have said is pretty much on the money. Having done a lot of PC work, I'm not too afraid to do anything concerning the BIOS with exception to flashing it (flash the wrong prom and you're buying a new motherboard just about). In the BIOS you'll see a section for 'Integrated peripherals' or something similar and in there you can disable the onboard sound. This will free up an IRQ and other needed resources so your new soundcard shouldn't have any problems. In some instances, two soundcards isn't a problem. In others, it is a problem as they both jockey for the same IRQ, get confused, and you're stuck with nothing. This is especially the case if your soundcard has jumpers for IRQ settings that match what the onboard soundcard has (unless your bios is new enough to change it).
    We the willing, led by the unknowing, have been doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much with so little for so long that we are now qualified to do just about anything with almost nothing.
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  6. #6
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    Or if you like playing around with DJ programs you can keep both cards and use mxing programs that require that.
    Or just get in the BIOS and disable the onboard sound.
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  7. #7
    Thanks for all of the suggestions. One thing though:

    How does one go about "getting into the BIOS?"

    I run Win2k, in case that helps in the least bit. I haven't gotten my card yet so I don't know what conflicts it might arouse, but when I do, I will let you guys know. (knocks on wood)


    first make sure you deinstalled it in Windows otherwise your windows become unstable
    "deinstalled" what? The sound card? I didn't know you could "un-install" things that were on-board? Is it the same as de/un-installing programs and/or drivers?

    Reluctantly waiting...
    ...the scent of your hair as you twirl in your fingers, and the time on the clock, when we realized that it\'s so late, and this walk that we shared....together!
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  8. #8
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    Originally posted by j0bber

    How does one go about "getting into the BIOS?"
    Getting into the BIOS depends on what type of BIOS & Motherboard you have. Some use F2, some use Delete..
    You should be able to see it just after you turn on your computer.



    The sound card? I didn't know you could "un-install" things that were on-board? Is it the same as de/un-installing programs and/or drivers?

    Reluctantly waiting...
    You can remove the drivers for the sound card from Windows, and tell Windows to ignore the device..
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"
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  9. #9
    Thank you Matty Cross. That was a dumb question, seeing how everytime I boot up, I'm always on the edge of pressing the F8 key, just to see what all of the "hub-bub" is about.

    Should I try the BIOS tip first, before I uninstall the drivers? I don't want to uninstall the drivers and then have no sound, before I check out the BIOS, do I?

    <random facts>I apologize for sounding so "new." I'm only 21 and have been around computers for about 5 years now. I would consider myself more knowledgable in the software field, than the hardware/networking field. I'm a computer graphics major with a minor in art, so I usually don't have to worry about the "insides" of a computer, just the programs I use.</random facts>

    Sorry for the lifestory. I'm not sure where that came from.
    Thanks again...
    ...the scent of your hair as you twirl in your fingers, and the time on the clock, when we realized that it\'s so late, and this walk that we shared....together!
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Ouroboros's Avatar
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    Post Hmmm...

    I could be wrong here, but I think that disabling the device in the BIOS renders the drivers for that device useless, thus, I'd try BIOS first, then remove the drivers after you boot up.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, as I don't know how the PnP(Plug 'n Play) feature in Windows works, exactly.

    Ouroboros
    "entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem"

    "entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity."

    -Occam's Razor

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