music protection again
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  1. #1
    sebastos12
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    music protection again

    Two weeks ago i think i have talked about protection of music CD's on Universal. Now i found that a greek CD has protection because the computer couldn't read it. It has the files in unknown type. Is there any ripper? Help, not immediately.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Info_Au's Avatar
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    The News in my local paper today said most C.D's with this protection are being made by Pirater's and not by Big Major C.D companies??
    So buy from Big Shops....

    C.D writers can't read these disks!!!

  3. #3
    oblio
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    The major labels, have started releasing discs in europe with their new encryption. It is not all CDs that have this, but random ones. There is no way to rip it without external audio hardware.

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    It's popping up on major labels now. But, I can't see what all the hype is about. I took my friend's FAST & FURIOUS CD, put it into my CD Player that's connected to my PC soundcard, and recorded the music to MP3 with Streambox Ripper. Sounds just as good.

    This new protection is a pretty lame attempt that can be thwarted by a "low tech" approach.


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  5. #5
    Old-Fogey:Addicts founder Terr's Avatar
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    Originally posted by ASTRIDPESHEK

    This new protection is a pretty lame attempt that can be thwarted by a "low tech" approach.
    Really. It's pretty rediculous, because ONE WAY OR ANOTHER, the sound gets to your speakers. And you can just take that analog information and digitize it, and amazingly you have a digital version which is NOT protected and is nearly the exact same. It's *repeated* analog copies that cause signal degradation. The industry is being pretty stupid, because there will always be someone out there willing to make these 'captured-output' versions, in which case most people will just download that, instead of trying to unsuccessfully rip their own.
    [HvC]Terr: L33T Technical Proficiency

  6. #6
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    Post ...

    Hey guys, this is not part of the main topic, but I think it can be parallel to it. What about DVD encryption, with Phillips comming out with a new DVD burner, what encyption, if any, will be out there on the market - and what are you doing to bypass it, if anything at all? So far companies have done a pathetic job at:
    • Stopping MP3
    • Stopping pirated music
    • Stopping p2p (person to person file transfers)
    • Significantly encrypting their music/movies


    ....disscussions are appreciated.
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  7. #7
    Old-Fogey:Addicts founder Terr's Avatar
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    Re: ...

    Originally posted by [WebCarnage]
    Hey guys, this is not part of the main topic, but I think it can be parallel to it. What about DVD encryption, with Phillips comming out with a new DVD burner, what encyption, if any, will be out there on the market - and what are you doing to bypass it, if anything at all?
    I think that both movies and music will be pretty unstoppable, the only thing the companies can really add is inconvenience. At the most basic level, a person can just record what is coming out of his speakers. After that, from an electronic perspective, who can say that the recorded information is copyrighted? It's just a digital representation of an analog playing... Unless you have software that detects key song phrases, or something... but that would have to be in the recording/burning process, and sounds a bit too complex to be workable.

    DVDs... similar. In the sense that they can be interactive, they're probably going to be a tougher nut. But if you don't want to replicate the exact interactivity, instead just wanting the actual movie clips, what's to stop someone from just recording the analog-to-the-TV signals from the player, digitizing them, and burning their own CD/DVD with the footage? Even if the signal to the TV is digital, it wouldn't appreciably make it more difficult if you have the right tools.

    I think the whole idea is doomed. A technological fix is not what is needed, what is needed is a new marketing or economy fix. A way to influence the minds behind the machines.
    [HvC]Terr: L33T Technical Proficiency

  8. #8
    Senior since the 3 dot era
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    Originally posted by ASTRIDPESHEK
    It's popping up on major labels now. But, I can't see what all the hype is about. I took my friend's FAST & FURIOUS CD, put it into my CD Player that's connected to my PC soundcard, and recorded the music to MP3 with Streambox Ripper. Sounds just as good.

    This new protection is a pretty lame attempt that can be thwarted by a "low tech" approach.

    Yeah but you don't have digital quality, just an analog copy. And, no offense, but mp3 does not sounds as good as a real audio CD (DDD mastered). It is impossible to get the same music depth with this low tech approach. I would say: listen to the original CD and your copy on a studio monitor system (let's say B&W speakers with a Mos-Fet class AA amplifier and you will hear the difference.

    There's a way to make a digital copy anyway: use the professional recording ecquipment from Marantz
    (the 500, 631, 770 recorder)
    they can edit the SCMS copy protection.
    http://www.marantz.com/pdfs/e_cdr_cdr770.pdf
    or from DENON: the DN-C550R ignores copy protection
    http://www.denon.com/catalog/photo.a...PG&c=54 <br />
    Only negative thing: these things are (very) expensive.

  9. #9
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    Question I got an idea

    Im not sure if this will work, but it sounds like a good idea to me. If normal cd players can read these protected cd's, then why dont you plug your discman or stereo into the computer and capture it while it playing? Sounds like a sure fire play to me. And another thing, since burners can't read these special cd's, I wonder if those new discmans that can play mp3 cd's and RW's will be useless trying to play these "protected" cd's. Anyhow, I think the companies are just being stupid... There is always a way aroung something



    Anyhow, if someone tries this, let me know. It will be interesting.
    If it weren\'t for electricity we\'d all be watching television by candlelight.

  10. #10
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    Re: I got an idea

    Originally posted by tridentrue
    [B]Im not sure if this will work, but it sounds like a good idea to me. If normal cd players can read these protected cd's, then why dont you plug your discman or stereo into the computer and capture it while it playing? Sounds like a sure fire play to me. And another thing, since burners can't read these special cd's, I wonder if those new discmans that can play mp3 cd's and RW's will be useless trying to play these "protected" cd's. Anyhow, I think the companies are just being stupid... There is always a way aroung something
    Hum... tridentrue my reply was against some post by ASTRIDPESHEK that said what you just posted. You should read my post above.

    Your way -> analog copy
    expensive way -> digital copy
    So it could be done, if you have the right CD Recorder/Mastertools.

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