c programming(am I in over my head?)
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Thread: c programming(am I in over my head?)

  1. #1
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    c programming(am I in over my head?)

    I just signed up at the local community college to take a C programming class. There was a pre-requisite of a basic programming concepts class, but I didn't think that I needed it since I already know SQL/PLSql, not like guru ville or anything, but I know em. So I asked the teacher for permission and she gave me permission, but not before this huge speach on how she wasn't going to go back and reteach the other class, etc. Now, I was pretty confident before, but now its a little shaken, does anyone out there think I am getting in over my head?
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  2. #2
    Priapistic Monk KorpDeath's Avatar
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    Depends on your grey matter. You might want to get your hands on 'C programming for dummies'......or just wing it.

    It couldn't be THAT difficult, could it? *laughing*
    Mankind have a great aversion to intellectual labor; but even supposing knowledge to be easily attainable, more people would be content to be ignorant than would take even a little trouble to acquire it.
    - Samuel Johnson
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  3. #3
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    If you know PL/SQL, you probably understand the structure of programming, if/else, for/next, do/while etc. C implements the same things in a different way, and it's not that hard, not until you reach a certain level.

    So I don't think you're in trouble. I started programming C after taking a course of Visual Basic for Applications (Excel) in college. The C came easy to me, but I noticed those with no programming background had a hard time. Until they undersood the very logic in programming. Some never understood it, but you certainly do, since you know PL/SQL. I guess programming is just like maths, either you understand it or you don't.
    ---
    proactive
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  4. #4
    Antionline Herpetologist
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    Definitely get your hands on a copy of C for Dummies! When I learned C, I was 11 years old! If Dan Gookin(the author) can teach a 11 year old kid, then he can teach anyone!
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  5. #5
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    well placebo it is always better to have a programming background
    in any language before u start to learn any language.
    at least u should know how to apply logic and how to run an .exe.
    well it is good that u already know pl/sql .
    but if u ask me then for me C is, C . it is the mother of all the
    languages we can say. well if u really want to reach the memory..then
    there is no language other then C.

    but this "C" is not at all difficult...u can take any book for dummies
    or go here for any information on the language.

    happy learning....all the best..

    intruder..
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  6. #6
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    Re: c programming(am I in over my head?)

    Originally posted by placebo
    I just signed up at the local community college to take a C programming class. There was a pre-requisite of a basic programming concepts class, but I didn't think that I needed it since I already know SQL/PLSql, not like guru ville or anything, but I know em. So I asked the teacher for permission and she gave me permission, but not before this huge speach on how she wasn't going to go back and reteach the other class, etc. Now, I was pretty confident before, but now its a little shaken, does anyone out there think I am getting in over my head?
    Well, personally, I don't think so. As long as you can learn C, you're well off. Just don't expect to do very well without the programming concepts class. Simply being able to write in C doesn't make you a good programmer. There are certain things that good programmers do and other programmers don't. It's like a good author. Many people know how to speak english, but only a few can write a good book.

    A few tips:
    -- Keep things compact and functional. If you have to do the same thing more than once in your code, make it a function. This keeps the code nicely separated for when you have to make changes to your applications.
    -- Make sure you comment everything, every little last detail. It will help you if you have to go back and work on something you don't remember everything about.
    Chris Shepherd
    The Nelson-Shepherd cutoff: The point at which you realise someone is an idiot while trying to help them.
    \"Well as far as the spelling, I speak fluently both your native languages. Do you even can try spell mine ?\" -- Failed Insult
    Is your whole family retarded, or did they just catch it from you?
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  7. #7
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    Good, thanks, what a relief! I'll get the dummies book, as an additional resource for the class. I am one of those people who learns better in a structured environment.
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  8. #8
    Hi mom!
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    If you have some time to prepare, I'd search for information on the term "Object-Oriented Programming." That should be a good base to continue with C.
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  9. #9
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    C?

    I am not sure why you wouldn't be taking c++, but anywho, I suggest you stick with it, and you will be glad you did in a semester from now.
    ------

    #include "iostream.h"

    int main()
    {
    cout << "\nhello world!\n\n";
    return;
    }

    heh.

    OverandOut.
    comJo
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