Batch File Help
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Thread: Batch File Help

  1. #1

    Batch File Help

    Can someone please translate this batch file below or redirect me to site where I can check the syntax for it.

    <BATCH FILE log.bat>
    @echo on
    for /f "tokens=1-7 delims=: " %%i in ('now.exe')
    do set iislogs=%%j%%k%%o%%l%%m%%n%%i
    "c:\program files\winzip\Wzzip.exe" %iislogs%.zip *.log
    del *.log
    <BATCH FILE END>

    I'd like to customised it in order to automatically zip IIS log file. At moment it only works if log files, now.exe and log.bat reside on same directory.


    If I move the log.bat file to another directory then specify the file path to now.exe. I would get the following output if I run it.

    C:\>log\W3svc3\log.bat

    C:\>FOR /F "tokens=1-7 delims=: " %i in ('c:\log\W3svc12\now.exe') do set iislog
    s=%j%k%o%l%m%n%i

    C:\>set iislogs=Jan242002125444Thu

    C:\>"c:\program files\winzip\Wzzip.exe" Jan242002125444Thu .zip *.log
    WinZip(R) Command Line Support Add-On Version 1.0 (Build 3181)
    Copyright (c) WinZip Computing, Inc. 1991-2000 - All Rights Reserved

    Warning: name not matched: *.log
    Adding .zip
    creating Zip file Jan242002125444Thu.zip

    C:\>del *.log
    Could Not Find C:\*.log


    smilies are ON

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    831

    Re: Batch File Help

    Originally posted by micky05



    C:\>log\W3svc3\log.bat

    C:\>FOR /F "tokens=1-7 delims=: " %i in ('c:\log\W3svc12\now.exe') do set iislog
    s=%j%k%o%l%m%n%i

    C:\>set iislogs=Jan242002125444Thu

    C:\>"c:\program files\winzip\Wzzip.exe" Jan242002125444Thu .zip *.log
    WinZip(R) Command Line Support Add-On Version 1.0 (Build 3181)
    Copyright (c) WinZip Computing, Inc. 1991-2000 - All Rights Reserved

    Warning: name not matched: *.log
    Adding .zip
    creating Zip file Jan242002125444Thu.zip

    C:\>del *.log
    Could Not Find C:\*.log


    Hi Micky.
    It looks to me like your not completing your paths.

    So you could try saying...
    C:\>"c:\program files\winzip\Wzzip.exe" Jan242002125444Thu .zip C:\WhereMyLogsAre\*.log

    C:\> del C:\WhereMyLogsAre\*.log


    What suggests that you have the paths wrong is that the Del *.log is taking place in straight C:\, rather than where your logs are..

    Hope that helps....
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"

  3. #3
    Everything was fine. I should I have tested the batch file this way.

    C:\cd log
    C:\log\cd W3svc
    C:\log\W3svc3>log.bat

    Instead of

    C:\>log\W3svc3\log.bat


    What I'd really like to learn is how to write batch files that work nicely with now.exe.

    Thanks Matty
    smilies are ON

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    3
    i got some info about .bat....

    BATCH FILES?

    What are batch files? Batch files are not programs, pre se, they are lists of command line instructions that are batched together in one file copied and edited They are usually used for simple routines and low-level machine instruction, but they can be very powerful. If you look in your C:\ or C:\WINDOWS folder you will see a multitude of .BAT, .SYS, .CFG, .INF and other types. These are all kinds of batch files. This may shock you, but while most applications are writen in Basic or C++ they sit on a mountain of batch files. Batch files are the backbone of the Windows operating system, delete them and you've effectively disabled the OS. There is a reason for this. The system batch files on each computer are unique the that computer and change each time a program is loaded. The operating system must have access to these files and be able to add and delete instructions from them.
    ===============
    BEGIN

    This is a little batch file. It deletes the cookies that get dumped to my hard drive every time I go online. I could set my browser preferences not to accept cookies, but sometimes cookies are useful. Some CGI pages are unusable with cookies, sometimes when you enter a password for a Website,With this batch file, all I have to do is double-click it and it deletes my cookies. Feel free to cut and paste this code to your Notepad or Wordpad. Save it as cookiekill.bat on your Desktop.

    cls
    REM *******************************************
    Rem ** Cookie Kill Program **
    REM *******************************************

    deltree /y c:\windows\cookies\*.*
    deltree /y c:\windows\tempor~1\*.*
    pause
    cls
    REM Cookies deleted!
    :end

    ======================
    BEGIN part 2

    What does the batch file do? The first line has the command cls. cls clears the screen window of any previous data. The next three lines start with REM for "remark." Lines begining with REM do not contain commands, but instructions or messages that will be displayed for the user. The next two lines begin with the command deltree, deltree not only deletes files but directories and sub-directories. In this case the file is deleting the directory cookies and all the files inside. This directory is automatically rebuilt. The deltree has been passed the parameter /y, this informs the process to answer "YES" to any confirmation questions. Sometimes you type the DEL or one of its cousins, the system will ask "Are sure you want to do this?" setting /y answers these prompts without interupting the process. The pause command halts the process temporarily and shows the users a list of all the files being deleted. cls clears the screen again, another REM line tells the user that the files are deleted. The last line contains only :end and returns the process to the command prompt. This version was created to show the user everything that is taking place in the process. The version bellow does the same thing without showing the user any details.

    cls
    @echo off

    deltree /y c:\windows\cookies\*.*
    deltree /y c:\windows\tempor~1\*.*

    cls

    ==========================
    BEGIN part 3

    Without REM lines there are no comments. The @echo off command keeps the process from being "echoed" in the DOS window, and without the pause and :end lines, the process runs and exits without prompting the user. In a process this small it is okay to have it be invisible to the user. With more a complex process, more visual feedback is needed. In computing there is fine line between too much and too little information. When in doubt give the user the oportunity to see what is going on.

    This version is a little more thurough, deletes alot of junk cls
    @ECHO OFF ECHO. *******************************************
    ECHO. ** Clean Cookies and Temp Files **
    ECHO. *******************************************
    deltree /y c:\windows\cookies\*.*
    deltree /y c:\windows\tempor~1\*.*
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\Cache\*.jpg
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\Cache\*.gif
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\Cache\*.htm
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\archive\*.htm
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\archive\*.gif
    deltree /y c:\progra~1\Netscape\Users\default\archive\*.jpg
    deltree /y c:\windows\temp\*.*
    deltree /y c:\temp\*.*
    deltree /y c:\windows\Recent\*.*
    deltree /y c:\recycled\*.*
    @ECHO OFF
    cls

    =============================
    BEGIN PART 4

    One thing I do quite often is erase old floppy disks. I might have a stack of them and I don't care what's on them, but I want all the files gone including potential virii.But I get tired of opening a DOS prompt and typing in the command to format the disk. So I wrote a one line batch file that does it for me. Save it as: "disk_wipe.bat"

    format a: /u
    Put a disk in the drive and double-click the .bat file icon.
    ========================
    COMMANDS
    here are some batch commands

    *Note: Any valid DOS command may be placed in a batch file, these commands are for setting-up the structure and flow of a batch file.




    CLS
    Clears the screen


    MSCDEX
    Loads the CD-ROM software extensions(drivers), usually so an operating system can be then loaded from CD. See the AUTOEXEC.BAT section for special instructions concerning CD ROM installation.


    CALL
    Calls another batch file and then returns control to the first when done.
    CALL C:\WINDOWS\NEW_BATCHFILE.BAT



    LASTDRIVE
    Sets the last drive in the system.
    lastdrive=Q
    EXIT
    Exits the command-line process when the batch file terminates
    EXIT



    BREAK
    When turned on, batch file will stop if the user presses < Ctrl >-< Break > when turned off, the script will continue until done.
    BREAK=ON

    BREAK=OFF



    CHOICE
    Allows user input. Default is Y or N.
    You may make your own choice with the /C: switch. This batch file displays a menu of three options. Entering 1, 2 or 3 will display a different row of symbols. Take note that the IF ERRORLEVEL statements must be listed in the reverse order of the selection. @ECHO OFF
    ECHO 1 - Stars
    ECHO 2 - Dollar Signs
    ECHO 3 - Crosses


    CHOICE /C:123

    IF errorlevel 3 goto CRS
    IF errorlevel 2 goto DLR
    IF errorlevel 1 goto STR

    :STR
    ECHO *******************
    ECHO.
    PAUSE
    CLS
    EXIT

    LR
    ECHO $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    ECHO.
    PAUSE
    CLS
    EXIT

    :CRS
    ECHO +++++++++++++++++++++
    ECHO.
    PAUSE
    CLS
    EXIT






    FOR...IN...DO




    GOTO
    To go to a different section in a batch file. You may create different sections by preceding the name with a colon. :SUBSECTION
    Programmers may find this similar to funtions or sub-routines.

    :FIRSTSECTION
    REM This is the first section
    GOTO :SUBSECTION

    :SUBSECTION
    REM This is the subsection
    GOTO :END
    :END


    Looping with GOTO
    :BEGIN
    REM Endless loop, Help!!
    GOTO :BEGIN


    IF (IF NOT EXIST)
    IF EXIST C:\tempfile.txt
    DEL C:\tempfile.txt
    IF NOT EXIST C:\tempfile.txt
    COPY C:\WINDOWS\tempfile.txt C:\tempfile.txt




    PAUSE
    Pauses until the user hits a key.

    This displays the familiar "Press any key to continue..." message.




    REM
    Allows a remark to be inserted in the batch script.

    REM DIR C:\WINDOWS Not run as a command
    DIR C:\WINDOWS Run as a command




    ECHO
    Setting ECHO "on" will display the batch process to the screen, setting it to "off" will hide the batch process.
    @ECHO OFF Commands are displayed
    @ECHO ON Commands are displayed

    =======================
    The AUTOEXEC.BAT file

    AUTOEXEC.BAT stands for automatic execution batch file, as in start-up automatically when the computer is turned on. Once a very important part of the operating system, it is being less used and is slowly disapearing from Windows. It is still powerful and useful.

    Before the graphical user interface(GUI, "gooey" of Windows, turning on a PC would display an enegmatic C:\> and not much else. Most computer users used the same programs over-and-over, or only one program at all. DOS had a batch file which set certain system environments on boot-up. Because this was a batch file, it was possible to edit it and add a line to start-up the user's programs automatically.

    When the first version of Windows was released users would turn their PCs on, and then type: WIN or WINDOWS at the prompt invoking the Windows interface. The next version of Windows added a line to the AUTOEXEC to start Windows right away. Exiting from Windows, brought one to the DOS prompt. This automatic invocation of Windows made a lot of people mad. Anyone who knew how to edit batch files would remove that line from the AUTOEXEC to keep Windows from controling the Computer. Most users do not even know that DOS is there now and have never seen it as Windows hides the any scrolling DOS script with their fluffy-cloud screen. At work I will often have to troubleshoot a PC by openning a DOS shell, the user's often panic, believing that I have broken their machine because the screen "turns black" (silly mortals).

    Most current versions of Windows have a folder called "Start-up." Any program or shortcut to a program placed in this folder will start automatically when the computer is turned on. This is much easier for most users to handle than editing batch files.

    Old versions of DOS had a AUTOEXEC that looked like this:

    @echo off
    prompt $p$g


    All this really did way set the DOS prompt to ">"

    Later versions looked like this:
    cls
    @echo off
    path c:\dos;c:\windows
    set temp=c:\temp
    Lh mouse
    Lh doskey
    Lh mode LPT1 retry

    This AUTOEXEC.BAT loads DOS & then Windows. Sets up a "temp" directory. Loads the mouse driver, sets DOSKEY as the default and sets the printer retry mode. "Lh" stands for Load High, as in high memory.

    An AUTOEXEC.BAT from a Windows 3.11 Machine
    @ECHO On
    rem C:\WINDOWS\SMARTDRV.EXE
    C:\WINDOWS\SMARTDRV.EXE 2038 512
    PROMPT $p$g
    PATH C:\DOS;C:\WINDOWS;C:\LWORKS;C:\EXPLORER.4LC
    SET TEMP=C:\DOS
    MODE LPT1:,,P >nul
    C:\DOS\SHARE.EXE /F:150 /L:1500
    C:\WINDOWS\mouse.COM /Y
    cd windows
    WIN




    This version simply sets DOS to boot to Windows.

    SET HOMEDRIVE=C:
    SET HOMEPATH=\WINDOWS



    Whenever a program is installed on a computer, the setup program or wizard will often edit the AUTOEXEC. Many developer studios will have to "set a path" so programs can be compiled or run from any folder. This AUTOEXEC is an example of that: SET PATH=C:\FSC\PCOBOL32;C:\SPRY\BIN
    SET PATH=C:\Cafe\BIN;C:\Cafe\JAVA\BIN;%PATH%
    SET HOMEDRIVE=C:
    SET HOMEPATH=\WINDOWS



    This AUTOEXEC sets the path for COBOL and JAVA development BINs. This way, the computer knows where to look for associated files for COBOL and JAVA files if they are not located directly in a BIN folder.





    Sets all the devices and boots to Windows.
    When the "REM" tags are removed the device commands become visible.
    @SET PATH=C:C:\PROGRA~1\MICROS~1\OFFICE;%PATH%
    REM [Header]
    @ECHO ON
    REM [CD-ROM Drive]
    REM MSCDEX.EXE /D:OEMCD001 /L:Z
    REM [Display]
    REM MODE CON: COLS=80 LINES=25
    REM [Sound, MIDI, or Video Capture Card]
    REM SOUNDTST.COM
    REM [Mouse]
    REM MOUSE.COM
    REM [Miscellaneous]
    REM FACTORY.COM


    For loading Windows from a CD @echo off
    MSCDEX.EXE /D:OEMCD001 /L
    d:
    cd \win95
    oemsetup /k "a:\drvcopy.inf"

    For loading CDROM drivers
    Removing the "REM" tags uncomments the commands and runs them.
    REM MSCDEX.EXE /D:OEMCD001 /l:d
    REM MOUSE.EXE





    The Windows Installation Catch-22
    You have a new computer with a unformated hard drive, or a drive with only DOS loaded. You want to load Windows from a CD, but you can't see the CD ROM from the DOS prompt. This is messy and can be screwed-up easily, luckily mistakes on this don't cause permanent damage. If you're lucky the CD ROM you have came with an installation disk(on floppy, of course). Putting this disk in and running the INSTALL.EXE or SETUP.EXE will install the drivers for you and alter the system files so you can load Windows from the CD ROM(Linux, by the way, has no problem with this!. If there is no INSTALL.EXE on the disk, you will have to edit lines in two files on your Windows 95 Boot/Install floppy disk. These files are: CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. Open these files for editing are look for lines that look like these:

    REM DEVICE=CDROM.SYS /D:OEMCD001

    And
    REM C:\DOS\MSCDEX.EXE /D:OEMCD001

    They may or may not be REMed out. You will need to change the "/D:OEMCD001" part of these lines to reflect the CD ROM that you have. For example if you have a Memorex it might be "/D:MSCD001". But be sure, check any manuals you might have lying around. If not, go to the manufacturer's website and down load the installation files. You will also need to figure out which drive letter it will be. If you only have on hard disk, it will be "D:" as in "/D:MSCD001," if you have two hard drives, or your drive is in several partitions, it might be "E:" or "F:". So then the line would be "/E:MSCD001" or "/F:MSCD001"

    The Final line in CONFIG.SYS might be like this: DEVICE=C:\WINDOWS\SBIDE.SYS /D:MSCD001 /V /P:170,15




    What the heck is "Chicago"?
    If you open enough system files in Windows, you will see the reoccurring use of the word "chicago" with seemingly no purpose. When Windows95 was in early development its secret name was "Chicago." Either people were to lazy to take the reference out or they left in out of a sense of nostalgia. Chicago shows up in just about every Windows .inf, .ini, .sys and .dll file. Just search your drive for files containing the word "chicago" and you'll get well over 100.

    A Look at CONFIG.SYS
    REM [Header]
    FILES=20
    BUFFERS=20
    DOS=HIGH,UMB
    REM [SCSI Controllers]
    REM DEVICE=SCSI.SYS
    REM [CD-ROM Drive]
    REM DEVICE=CDROM.SYS /D:OEMCD001
    REM [Display]
    REM DEVICE=DISPLAY.SYS
    REM [Sound, MIDI, or Video Capture Card]
    REM DEVICE=SOUND.SYS
    REM [Mouse]
    REM DEVICE=MOUSE.SYS
    REM ------------------
    REM [Miscellaneous]
    REM DEVICE=SMARTDRV.EXE

    ==================
    now you should no alot more about batch viruses and how much they work if you dont then just get a ready made one and then stop moaning.

    oopsssss!!!!!! sorry if i post some harmful information. hehehee....

    oopsssss!!!!!! sorry if i post some harmful information. hehehee....
    zerocool666

  5. #5
    Thanks, zerocol666. Very useful info about batch file.
    smilies are ON

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