Digital Dog Tags
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Thread: Digital Dog Tags

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Digital Dog Tags

    Privacy is becoming less and less a concern for E-Commerce companies

    SAN FRANCISCO--Sun Microsystems has joined a program called Auto-ID to build wireless digital identification tags into everything from razor blades to soup cans, Chief Executive Scott McNealy said Thursday.
    The technology promises efficiency for manufacturers and convenience for shoppers--but potentially also headaches for those concerned about privacy.


    McNealy and his colleagues at Sun have eagerly anticipated the day when everything with a "digital heartbeat"--cell phones, cars, microwave ovens--is attached to the Internet. Sun hopes to supply the mammoth servers that will process all the information produced by these devices.

    "I used to talk about everything with a digital or electric heartbeat" being connected to the Internet, McNealy told financial analysts in a speech here Thursday. "Now I'm talking about tomato cans, and I'm not making it up anymore," he quipped.

    Sun has joined the Auto-ID program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, funded by Procter & Gamble, Gillette, Wal-Mart, Unilever, Tesco, Target and other corporations.

    "You put stuff in a grocery basket and just drive by (a detector)," McNealy said, describing the idea. The detector reads what's in the basket, charges a person's credit card and "tells the factory to restock the shelves," McNealy said.

    The goal of the Auto-ID program is to keep store shelves full, said Gillette spokesman Steve Brayton. On any given afternoon, 8 percent of the items that U.S. shoppers are looking for are out of stock, he said. On Sunday, it goes up to 11 percent.

    In addition, the technology could help curb theft, Brayton said.

    Wal-Mart is trying out the technology in a pilot project in Tulsa, Okla.

    "We think within two to three years you'll find some early adopters among retail and manufacturing businesses," Brayton said. "We're looking at five to 10 years to widespread use."

    Privacy problems?
    But building transponders into every sort of product could spark privacy concerns, said David Holtzman, an Internet security researcher and former Network Solutions chief technology officer.

    People might not be comfortable walking around with items that identify themselves as medication, condoms or pornography. They also might not be comfortable with manufacturers tracking where products go after being purchased.

    And "if legislators mandate mandatory tagging of things like firearms or ammunition, we could get both the left and right wing pissed off," Holtzman said.

    Keeping store shelves stocked or easing checkout isn't a big deal, Holtzman said. But combining that product information with data about the individuals buying those products could raise hackles.

    "Any one piece of information"--cell phone records, purchasing records, car location--"is not that damning or intrusive. But if you put them together, you've got my life," Holtzman said. "It's very hard to hide things when you have that level of analysis."

    Even if these uses aren't what retailers and manufacturers have in mind, technology has a way of creeping into other domains, Holtzman added. Transponders for driving through electronic tollbooths started as a convenience to drivers but now are used in combination with timing analysis to send out speeding tickets, for example.

    How it's done
    Auto-ID uses passive tags that respond to a specific radio signal. A tiny capacitor on the chip stores enough energy from the incoming signal to send out a response. The tags only respond when near a special reader device.

    The tags also have a miniature chip and enough memory to keep track of a digital identity. The memory is 96 bits long, tiny by computer standards but it provides a huge number of combinations of ones and zeros.

    The technology is set up to identify more than 268 million manufacturers with more than a million individual products each, an Auto-ID representative said.

    The memory stores an electronic product code, or EPC, which is linked with an Internet service called the Object Naming Service (ONS) that keeps track of data for every EPC-labeled object. Researchers also are working on a pared-down 64-bit version of EPC.

    But the system is limited by the cost of making the tags, not to mention installing the infrastructure to monitor the tags and process the information.

    With existing technology, tags cost about 50 cents. That's not much additional expense for a $1,000 computer, but it is for a $3.50 bottle of shampoo.

    Gillette expects the investment to pay off in the long run, though, and Auto-ID researchers are examining ways to bring the cost of tags down to a nickel apiece.

    "The researchers of the Auto-ID Center believe the goal of the 5 cent tag is difficult but achievable," research director Sanjay Sarma wrote in a February paper that describes a plan to build a low-cost prototype in a year.

    This story is from here

  2. #2
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    Big brother, yep thats it.

    Saw an article on the news the other night about eye scanners being used as a form of ID.

    Now how much of a Big Brother state is that?

    "But building transponders into every sort of product could spark privacy concerns, said

    David Holtzman, an Internet security researcher and former Network Solutions chief

    technology officer". Geez this guy needs a medal or something.



  3. #3
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    LOL After 9-11 privacy is no longer a concern for big brother (as if it ever was)....

  4. #4
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    Thats often the way, a government will use an event - normally a bad one - to say that new emergency laws are needed to counteract this new threat. Which is all well and good, and in the case of terrorism maybe a positive step. But how much should jon doe be affected by these new measures?




  5. #5
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    Very soon John and Jane Doe wont be nameless anymore... FBI and other national security agencies are stepping up security everywhere.... Which is a good thing except there denying people their privacy....

  6. #6
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    I think the concept of having privacy rights will diminish more and more in the future. Already there are computer progs available that can take a pic of your face as you walk down the road going about your business and compare it to a list in its data banks. Now I am in two minds about this software. 1. I am doing nothing illegal (most of the time, lol) so I have no need to worry 2. My rights of anonymity should be assured, so what right does the goverment have for running these type of applications? The government would say this type of 'active process' is part of crime fighting or something. Me I think they just want greater control to make their lives easier. Privacy should be a right, not a belief.




  7. #7
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    I wonder why the upc coding isn't good enough. This is not a good development.

    living in the UK where many many streets are filmed must be annoying indeed. It is spreading too.
    Trappedagainbyperfectlogic.

  8. #8
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    Info: The UK is one of the most filmed nations (through CCTV) in the world. If not THE most

    filmed nation. Like Gold Eagle says though, the concept of CCTV being used to counteract

    crime is speading all the time. Normally the UK is behind the US buy a few years in new

    fads etc. Sadly this is one where we have you beat

    I want to move to the Autralian outback!




  9. #9
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    I remember looking at this website that show all the locations of CCTV in the United States... I forgot what it was though ... The site was interesting though it also had a 'map maker' that shows you the least photographed passage from point A to point B.. If anyone knows the site im talking about please post a link....

  10. #10
    AntiOnline Senior Member
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    I think it is horrible on how much our privacy has been invaded since 9-11. I mean, I am all for security and trying to stop terrorists, but so many times, the U.S. goes overboard in their attempts for security.
    [shadow]uraloony, Founder of Loony Services[/shadow]
    Visit us at
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