Introduction to IPv6
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Introduction to IPv6

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    472

    Lightbulb Introduction to IPv6

    IPv4 has been around for quite a while now and up until recently it has worked fine. But with the address capacity limit of IPv4, new technology is needed. IPv4 has only a capacity of 4 billion addresses, and the introduction of handheld terminals and mobile phones with access to the internet are going to need more addresses than this.

    IPv6 is not a new protocol, its ten years old but was released 6 years ago. It has many more addresses than IPv4, I donít have the exact number but Iíve heard there are several hundred addresses for every square meter of the earths surface.

    Even though IPv6 has a capacity of more addresses than IPv4, itís actually smaller in space, about half. Here are the headers for both protocols:

    IPv4:
    Ver, IHL, ToS, Total Length
    Identifier, Flags, Fragment Offset
    TTL, Protocol, Cheksum
    Source Address
    Dest. Address
    Options

    IPv6:
    Ver, Traffic Class, Flow Label
    Payload Length, Next Header, Hop Limit
    Source Address
    Dest. Address

    Details about the headers can be found here:
    Short version
    Long version

    IPv6 has functionality that supports modern communication. One of the features is the possibility to prioritize data. This is very useful with broadband-services such as streaming of video and audio, wich is sensitive to slow connections. By giving this data higher priority it will be routed faster than e-mail and other internet-traffic on the network. This feature is also very useful for telephone services on the internet (VoIP, Voice over IP). This service is very sensitive to lost packages, as speech will become very unclear with just a little information lost.

    The introduction of IPv6 is taking quite some time, because itís not compatible with IPv4. You canít just put an IPv6 router into an IPv4 network. Workarounds have to be created, here are two possibilities: 1. If an IPv6 router wants to gain access to a IPv4 network, it has to create a IPv4 wrapping around itís packets. When another IPv6 router receives the IPv4 packet, it has to remove the wrapping. 2. Header translation, a way to translate an IPv6 packet to IPv4 and back again.

    Ipv6 has built-in security. Perhaps this is going to compete with SSL. Her is a link on the issue.
    ---
    proactive

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    66
    Would you happen to know if the routers and other network devices will become kinda 'obsolete' once it changes?
    Do you know when it is going to change? Apparently, Novell has some work already done and I would not like to be caught by the wave....

    Thanks
    -Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate-

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    472
    Well, replacing IPv4 with IPv6 wont happen overnight. But sometime in the near future IPv4 will become obsolete. I suppose in a few years time, depending on the mobile-phone market. I guess there's some overhead involved with translating from one protocol to the other, so it's better to replace all the routers as fast as possible. Maybe we're just looking at a software upgrade, that I don't know.

    As far as I've heard the process of replacing IPv4 with IPv6 is somewhat difficult. Metaphores like "replacing the engine of a plane while in mid-air" and the like is often mentioned. But there's some heavy resarch on this right now. I suppose the mobil-phone giants like Nokia, Ericsson and Motorola are spending quite a lot of resources, because their terminals(mobile phones) need the new protocol.
    ---
    proactive

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,193
    sometimes these coexist on the same piece of equipment on the same network right now. On some systems ipv4 and ipv6 are running. It is likely that the hardware corps will justify all these upgrades like they did in 2000.
    Trappedagainbyperfectlogic.

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    77
    No Doubt.... IPv6 is going to take years before it gets widely adopted.. But this is for the good...as its going to give technology a better chance to mature further and let admins and developers get a finer viewpoint of the required upgradation details ....

    May the voyage be smooth.....

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    634
    Its already taken years, it was orginally thought up in the early 90's...

    for more indepth info check one of the leading websites on this sort of thing - http://www.cs-ipv6.lancs.ac.uk/

    i2c

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides