Big Bang
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Thread: Big Bang

  1. #1
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    Big Bang

    Arrording to many scientists the universe started with a "big bang" that was so loud that that the noise of it is still reverberating arount the universe. I have heard that the only reason we don't hear this sound is that we are so accustomed to it (as we were hearing it from the moment we were conceived ).

    This I don't understand.

    The scientists say that even after all this time the "bang" is still incredably loud. As sound travels in waves, the waves from the bang should still be all around us. The human ear works by channeling sound waves into the ear which cause the tempanic membrane (the ear drum) to vibrate which in turn transfers a message to the brain. So why doesn't the ear drum vibrate constantly, (which it doesn't), because of these waves.

    If our ear drums automatically cancels these waves so that we can't hear them I wonder what other sounds are out there that are automatically canceled out.
    If you don\'t learn the rules nobody can accuse of cheating.

  2. #2
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    Maybe the sound is so loud and incredible, that the sound sounds like nothing. Maybe the silence we hear IS the big bang sound.
    Understand?
    =D
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  3. #3
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    Morfius.I get what you are saying but I still don't understand why the ear drum doesn't vibrate.
    I feel that according to the theory of the big bang the ear drum should still vibrate even if the brain cancels out the sound afterwards.
    If you don\'t learn the rules nobody can accuse of cheating.

  4. #4
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    the ear drums are tuned in a precise rfrequency range... animals have a better hearing and they would still no hear it
    human range:20-20 000 Hz
    http://www.norsonic.com/web_pages/human_hearing.html
    on top of the remarqs they have, you have to add the capacity of the humain brain to solve teh so called tea party problem( simply put you are at a party and everyone is talking...assuming you are sober, you WILL be able to identify the voice of someone who is very close to you: mom/ dad brother best friends... while filtrering everyhting else That is not possible for pc's right now, imagine the applications in cell phones ...)


    you can' hear the sound of the big bang cuz their range are in the are 0.01 to 0.001 cycles/second... (do a search on google...)

    also, you wouldn't hear them because to hear them you must be wittin range of hearing
    assuming the big bang occured it would have pushed matter and sounds in all direction (assuming they travel at the same speed which is not possible...) take the time for suns to aggregate then planets then life or whatever ... then there is no way you could hear something that is long gone... you could consider the case where the sound might be reflected and the reflexion acting as a new source but ...
    so go to http://www.naic.edu/genpubx.htm and tune in !!!

    i'll get ime to write a tute about signals and systems...
    assembly.... digital dna ?

  5. #5
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    Thanks, that more or less answers my question.
    If you don\'t learn the rules nobody can accuse of cheating.

  6. #6
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    Hmmm... I have a couple of questions:

    The Big Bang occured some 15 billion years ago. The Bang itself took let's say a couple of
    seconds. Right after the Big Bang, the sound starts moving at a speed of let's say 1000 ft per second (don't know the exact speed of sound in a vacuum). Let's say the wave it creates is a couple of miles long (depending on how long the Bang itself lasted). That wave will move away from the point where the Big Bang occured, right... And can only be heared by someone 'standing' in that wave... If we would be able to hear that sound, wouldn't that imply that the earth is moving at the exact same speed the 'Bang' is moving, and in exactly the same direction?

    Just some thoughts...

  7. #7
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    Re : Negative,
    in order to listen to a wave, we have to be in its path or distinguish some effect it had on something else ... if we are not in it path we can still recover the original signal by applying the appropriate filter... (ie when you listen to an ambulance, the siren start off very sharp then as it goes away it is very fade, it's known as the doppler effect,) the same thing is happening.

    As the proper sounds of the bigabang, i don't think it is possible to detect it cuz earth is kindoff in the middle of the milkway galaxy, itself into some other group of galaxy...
    i think they've proven that the sounds they can detect with the radio telescope is generated by specific stars/objects in space. it's like in an ee ckt, whatever you do to it they will be noise... call it white/ pink noise; it will be there.

    if you were stuck in a empty room 600ft under ground their will still be noises coming .... from you, you breath and your heart bit are strong enough for you to hear them...
    hope that helps
    assembly.... digital dna ?

  8. #8
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    speed of sound in a vacuum?

    Ummm, ummm.

    Doesn't sound need something, like air, in order to cause the wave to work. If one molecule doesn't bump against another molecule, then another molecule won't bump against another molecule, so their won't be any transfer of energy, and hence no sound?

    So in a vacuum, the molecules are SO far apart, that no energy is transfered, or very little, and so very little or no sound will be. Like an alarm-clock in a bell-jar, we don't hear it, or we only here very little of it.

    But, um, I am not a science person.

    But it seems funny to me, that space is a vacuum, and they are talking about sound.

    Hmm.

    Just my thoughts, I could be wrong.
    dhej

  9. #9
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    actually you are right, sounds needs a meduim to propagate,
    yet what i was reffering as "sounds" is the whole radio frequency spectrum, which does propagates in absolute vacum (the simplest ex being lightwaves)
    we just started off the wrong def, but that is all cleared out ! thanks for reminding me

    The key to explaining something complew is to simplify the problem to the point any explantations will do, but then what have you achieved .... ?
    assembly.... digital dna ?

  10. #10
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    phew, I thought I was lost. . .

    Anyway, I will now understand this as:

    There is some frequency of energy traveling through space as a result of the terrible amount of energy of the Big Bang.

    That I can live with.

    Now, so if this energy was moving out from the epicenter, wouldn't this energy have passed us by now?
    But then, now this is by far above my level of comprehension, and I will go back to lurker mode.

    cheers,

    Dhej

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