Stamp Out Http
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Thread: Stamp Out Http

  1. #1
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    Stamp Out Http

    I READ THIS ARTICLE AND THOUGHT I WOULD POST IT SO AO MEMBERS WHO DIDNT KNOW, NOW DO.


    Delivering the keynote at European DevWeek in London on Tuesday, Don Box, an architect for Microsoft's .NET Developer Platform team, said HTTP presents a major challenge for Web services, for peer-to-peer applications and even for security. A replacement will eventually have to be found, he said, but it is not at all clear who will provide this replacement.

    HTTP, or HyperText Transport Protocol, is used by virtually every Web page on the Internet. It is the mechanism by which a browser sends a request to a server on the Internet, and then receives the response.



    "One of the big challenges facing Web services is our reliance on HTTP," said Box. However, there is nothing wrong with HTTP per se, as its ubiquity and high dependability means it is the only way to get an a reliable end-to-end connection over the Internet, he added. "If people can't search the Web they call the IT department, so the IT department makes sure HTTP is always working. We have engineered the hell out of it." So much so, indeed, that Box likes to think of HTTP as the "cockroach of the Internet" because "after the holocaust it will be the only protocol left standing."

    But, he said, we can't stay on HTTP forever, despite all the investment and engineering that have gone into it. Among the problems with HTTP, said Box, is the fact that it is a Remote Procedure Call (RPC) protocol; something that one program (such as a browser) uses to request a service from another program located in another computer (the server) in a network without having to understand network details.

    This works for small transactions asking for Web pages, but when Web services start running transactions that take some time to complete over the protocol, the model fails. "If it takes three minutes for a response, it is not really HTTP any more," Box said. The problem, said Box, is that the intermediaries--that is, the companies that own the routers and cables between the client and server--will not allow single transactions that take this long.

    "We have to do something to make it (HTTP) less important," said Box. "If we rely on HTTP we will melt the Internet. We at least have to raise the level of abstraction, so that we have an industry-wide way to do long-running requests--I need a way to send a request to a server and not the get result for five days."

    Adapting for P2P
    Another problem with HTTP, said Box, is that it is asymmetric. "Only one entity can initiate an exchange over HTTP, the other entity is passive, and can only respond. For peer-to-peer applications this is not really suitable," he said. The reason that peer-to-peer applications do work today, said Box, is that programmers create hacks to get around the limitations of the protocol, and this is not good. "It's all hackery, it's all ad-hoc and none of it is interoperable," he added.

    There is work going on to address the shortcomings of HTTP, said Box. Several working groups are working on the problem at the W3C, the organisation responsible for Web standards. And even though Microsoft is working on the problem too, Box did say that Microsoft is unlikely to succeed alone.

    "Microsoft has some ideas (on how to break the independence on HTTP), IBM has some ideas, and others have ideas. We'll see," he said. But, he added, "if one vendor does it on their own, it will simply not be worth the trouble."

    By Matt Loney
    Special to ZDNet News
    February 26, 2002, 7:40 AM PT


    I WAS NOT SURE WHERE TO POST THIS SO I FIGURED HERE WAS SAFE
    ENJOY
    My only fear in death is comming back reincarnated.

    \"Would I ever sh*t you?\"
    \"Of course not you are my favorite turd.\"--E5C4P3

  2. #2
    Forgotten Ghost RogueSpy's Avatar
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    Nice post. Just make sure you give credit where credit is due. See ya on the IRC server.
    "Never give in-never, never, never, in nothing great or small, large or petty, never give in to convictions of honor and good sense. Never yield to force; never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy!" - Winston Churchill

  3. #3
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    good post
    and i love p2p tech
    assembly.... digital dna ?

  4. #4
    Flash M0nkey
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    good post - i don't want to even think what kinda probs its gonna cause if/when we lose the http

    v_Ln

  5. #5
    Seeing as how the person who gave this speech was a microsoft developer, and the fact that Microsoft is working on the problems associated with http, I can safely assume that Microsoft is trying to release a proprietary internet protocol.
    Jealousy consumes the weak.
    http://www.badconnections.net

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by AnthonyGayden
    Seeing as how the person who gave this speech was a microsoft developer, and the fact that Microsoft is working on the problems associated with http, I can safely assume that Microsoft is trying to release a proprietary internet protocol.
    Indeed, you would be right to assume.
    My only fear in death is comming back reincarnated.

    \"Would I ever sh*t you?\"
    \"Of course not you are my favorite turd.\"--E5C4P3

  7. #7
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    hehe would be supprised knowing the strategies in the past few years they wanna control the net so they probably relising somthing to do with .net that is worse than http but buy out everything else so ppl have to use it hehe ohh well what will ya do
    RiOtEr

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