FreeBSD 4.4 Stable - Page 2
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Thread: FreeBSD 4.4 Stable

  1. #11
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    Installing OpenBSD is very easy, just donīt ask about dual booting because then the hard part comes
    I am not an expert on this matter to say that OpenBSD is more secure then FreeBSD, but if you are not a newbie then you would know how to close services you donīt need and secure a FreeBSD box. In OpenBSD everything is closed, you canīt even telnet to the box. SOme people might prefer this as a start.

  2. #12
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    i used to have freebsd 4.2 box running which i was very happy with. to be honest, i prefer freebsd as opposed to linux. i dont know why. i have a red hat box going, but i just enjoyed setting up the freebsd box more. yes it is more of a challenge, but well worth it. you have total control over the system and configuration, where as it seems that red hat has become a bit too commercial or mainstream for my tastes. it trys to shortcut everything, like windows does, so that the user really does not have to configure the system much at all. at least for installs. it is all a matter of personal opinion i suppose.
    \"Computer games don\'t affect kids; I mean if Pac-Man affected us as kids, we\'d all be running around in darkened rooms munching magic pills and listening to repetitive electronic music.\" Kristian Wilson, Nintendo, Inc. 1989

  3. #13
    Priapistic Monk KorpDeath's Avatar
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    FreeBS rocks. OpenBSD is good too. I would start with FreeBSD. It has a step by step installation but after that you are on your own. It's pretty amazing how much you can harden FreeBSD and still have it usable. Most important of all is to have fun.
    Mankind have a great aversion to intellectual labor; but even supposing knowledge to be easily attainable, more people would be content to be ignorant than would take even a little trouble to acquire it.
    - Samuel Johnson

  4. #14
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    The installation of freebsd is also very easy in my opinion, the hardest part is creating the partition, but go out to their website, and there are some very good HOWTO's.
    Really? The times I've tried installing it (I alway reinstall debian after three days or so), I've been really amazed that there is actually a default partition scheme if you wanna use it. I have never seen anything like it in linux. I actually wrote it down on paper to use when reinstalling debian.
    Mankan

    \"The purpose of abstraction is not to be vague, but to create a new semantic level in which one can be absolutely precise.\"
    - Edsger Dijkstra

  5. #15
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    You are right, you could just use auto partitioning..

    The only problem for me is that i mainly use *bsd for FW's and IDS which requires lots of log space. /var at 256MB just doesn't cut it for me....lol

    I was just trying to say that the install is really pretty easy, and I think the hardest part is determining proper partition size (although it is not that hard)

    Oh...and I forgot to answer your question about the "fancy package system" in freebsd. There is one, and it is the best IMO...it is called the ports collection. You can either run /stand/sysinstall and go back to the setup screen to add packages, or you can just browse to any application directory under /usr/ports, from there, it is nothing more than a single command to install any package 'make install'

    The latest package will be downloaded, compiled, and installed...all in one easy step

  6. #16
    AntiOnline Senior Member souleman's Avatar
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    freebsd ---> www.freebsd.org Most popular bsd variant, and easiest.
    openbsd --> www.openbsd.org Most secure bsd variant
    netbsd -----> www.netbsd.org Most portable bsd variant...Installs on just about any system.
    closedbsd --> www.closedbsd.org Smallest bsd variant....All on floppy (no need for hard drive). This version is basically a firewall (like Foc said).

    www.bsd.org Gives rateher dated (1999) information about bsd.
    \"Ignorance is bliss....
    but only for your enemy\"
    -- souleman

  7. #17
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    The only problem for me is that i mainly use *bsd for FW's and IDS which requires lots of log space. /var at 256MB just doesn't cut it for me....lol
    Oh, that sucks. I thought it actually gave percentage of the space available to different partitions.

    As for the packageing system it sounds really neat. I gotta get another box.
    Mankan

    \"The purpose of abstraction is not to be vague, but to create a new semantic level in which one can be absolutely precise.\"
    - Edsger Dijkstra

  8. #18
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    i was on my first step installing FreeBSD an older version 3.3 for unix.
    but i was looking for a reference manuals or some papers for help ....

    should i stop this version and go to the next one 4.x what do u think ?
    When the power of Love overcomes the Love of power, the world will know peace... Jimi Hendrix
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    I dream of giving birth to a child who will ask...... what was war?

  9. #19
    I would have to say that if you installed Debian, you should get FreeBSD working quite easily (not really a user-friendly install but not too hard either) and I must also say that getting a FreeBSD machine doing NAT is MUCH easier than getting a Debian box to do it (much more straightforward, nice chapter on that in the handbook)

  10. #20
    Senior Member linuxcomando's Avatar
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    I love the BSD's. OpenBSD is my favorite the only reason i dont run it my work is for 2 reasons.....it doesn't support SMP and java wont run on it.

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