Which flavour of Linux is best as a server? - Page 2
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Thread: Which flavour of Linux is best as a server?

  1. #11
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    Check out www.linux.org
    they got some pretty good small distro's that are used for certain tasks.

  2. #12
    Banned
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    Oct 2001
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    Check out www.linux.org
    they got some pretty good small distro's that are used for certain tasks.

  3. #13
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    Hello Rewandythal, If you are going to use your machine as a webserver, I suggest that you download the newest version of Apache from their website. Any distribution of linux can make a good server operating system if used correctly. I currently use Linux Mandrake 8.1 as my webserver and it works fine. As for the BSD's here is a warning. They are more difficult to install than most linux distros.
    Wine maketh merry: but money answereth all things.
    --Ecclesiastes 10:19

  4. #14
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    Hello Rewandythal, If you are going to use your machine as a webserver, I suggest that you download the newest version of Apache from their website. Any distribution of linux can make a good server operating system if used correctly. I currently use Linux Mandrake 8.1 as my webserver and it works fine. As for the BSD's here is a warning. They are more difficult to install than most linux distros.
    Wine maketh merry: but money answereth all things.
    --Ecclesiastes 10:19

  5. #15
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    Well... I use Debian/GNU Linux stable on my boxes, and unstable on workstations... and i can say that debian is realy STABLE and i have good perfomance with it :]

    P.S sorry for my baaad english :]
    ---------------
    Dennis Nasarov
    Pheonix
    http://linux.net.kg
    Linux-Power of the net!
    http://linux.net.kg

  6. #16
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    hehe by a sparc server the only way to go hehe only a few thousand dollars but solaris is good?!
    redhat is probaly best if ur a newbie to linux but if your a vetran go freebsd as they are probably the most secure remote wise
    RiOtEr

  7. #17
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    Rioter: Isn't NetBSD the one which is meant to be hella secure?

    On the topic, for a Linux distribution, from what I've heard, Debian is one of the best for it, due to the time they spend testing the components of the distribution....

    I've heard many good things on the BSD family, but have yet to actually fiddle with it....
    -Matty_Cross
    \"Isn\'t sanity just a one trick pony anyway? I mean, all you get is one trick. Rational Thinking.
    But when you\'re good and crazy, hehe, the skies the limit!!\"

  8. #18
    Priapistic Monk KorpDeath's Avatar
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    OpenBSD and FreeBSD rock. The most stable and fatstest performers out there. They can also be hardened extremely well.

    The only shortcoming BSD has is it's support for some hardware. But then, you'd all check that out before you go having a bad experience with it because of unsupported hardware, now wouldn't you?
    Mankind have a great aversion to intellectual labor; but even supposing knowledge to be easily attainable, more people would be content to be ignorant than would take even a little trouble to acquire it.
    - Samuel Johnson

  9. #19
    AntiOnline Senior Member souleman's Avatar
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    RiOter and Matty> OpenBSD is the most secure out of the box. FreeBSD is most user friendly and NetBSD is most portable. If you are talking an old P120, you shouldn't have a problem installing any of them.

    If you know linux, and like it, I would go with Slackwear. If you kinda know linux, get Debian. If you are new, then get Redhat. Suse is ok, but has a LOT of CD's. Mandrake is quirky in my experience.

    Just a thought. If you are going to be making this an http/ftp/smb server, then you don't want it as your firewall/proxy. Besides the fact that you are going to need quite a bit of RAM, SMB on on internet connected machine is crazy. Thats just asking for trouble.
    \"Ignorance is bliss....
    but only for your enemy\"
    -- souleman

  10. #20
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    If you want to use you comp as a router/firewall, there's quite a cool small distribution from Mandrake : Single Network Firewall (SNF). It uses a secured kernel, and has several security options enable and improved from "normal" distributions.
    You can configure it by using your usual internet browser : all its configuration can be done through a web page.

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