Perfect Encryption
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Thread: Perfect Encryption

  1. #1
    Senior Member cwk9's Avatar
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    Post Perfect Encryption

    Here is an article about a perfect encryption

    http://www.discover.com/may_02/gther...=feattech.html

    Theoretically, perfect encryption has been around for a long time. In 1918 American mathematician Gilbert Vernam invented the one-time cipher, which substitutes a random number or letter for each character in a message. As long as you don't reuse that random sequence for subsequent messages, nobody can break the code. But to employ the code, you must send the sequence—the key that unscrambles the encrypted message—to the intended receiver.
    Of course a true perfect encryption system is hard to make because some were along the line the data has to appear in an unencrypted state so people can comprehend it.

  2. #2
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    I think "perfect" encryption is a little tough to achieve simply because there always needs to be a way to decipher it through a relatively simple and highly reproduceable means.
    \"Windows has detected that a gnat has farted in the general vicinity. You must reboot for changes to take affect. Reboot now?\"

  3. #3
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    it shall never be perfect
    aislinn, Aria, BTBAM, chevelle, codeseven, Cky, dredg, evergreen terrace, from autumn to ashes,hopesfall, hxc, luti-kriss, nirvana, norma jean, shai hulud, this hero dies, tool, underoath, zao,

  4. #4
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    No it can't be perfect as same as a lock if u copy the key it can be opened
    hip hop rules

  5. #5
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    encryption is only good for a length of time after which faster CPUs crack and decipher the encrypted data. its the best we can do.

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  6. #6
    AntiOnline Senior Member souleman's Avatar
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    A one time pad is as close to perfect encryption as you can get, but it still isn't perfect. Because of the size, there is no way that both people could memorize the entire onetime pad. Therefore, it must be written down. The moment you do that, you have caused a vulnerabilty.....
    \"Ignorance is bliss....
    but only for your enemy\"
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  7. #7
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    As souleman said, a one time pad is perfect as long as the key used is random, and nobody can obtain a copy of the key. It doesn't have to be written down (might be stored on a floppy/CD for example - with the original copy permanently erased), but like all encryption methods, it is vulnerable if the floppy/CD can be acquired by someone else.
    Depends on how you generate your random numbers, but if it is done well then this is very difficult to crack.
    Same principle applies for something like PGP really - the best place to store your keys etc. is on removable media (floppy/CD), which you make sure are secure.

  8. #8
    Senior Member BrainStop's Avatar
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    How secure is secure?

    To use a key, two people need it ... the encrypter and the decrypter. This means two copies which can be found. After all, someone might break in at the encrypter's and copy the key before it used and erased. The same applies at the decrypters.

    No security system by itself is perfect. You can improve the security level by combining various methods, but there will always be the risk of the person. How do you secure the brain of an individual ... he can be bought after all (or blackmailed, or tortured, ...).

    Whatever you do, a message originates and arrives. Those remain weak links in the chain.

    Cheers,

    BrainStop
    "To estimate the time it takes to do a task, estimate the time you think it should take, multiply by two, and change the unit of measure to the next highest unit. Thus we allocate two days for a one-hour task." -- Westheimer's Rule

  9. #9
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    i hope that i don't have any sensitive data left in about 20 years, because the argument of "the perfect encryption" is that far away from becoming a moot point.

    true terminal quantum computers are coming. 10e computing sets exist in the experimental phase at the University of California, Irvine Chemistry and Quantum Computing labs.

    As some of you may know, the advent of quantum computing exponentialy decreases the theoretical time needed to solve an algorythm. Hell, gifted mathematicians have nearly solved the "god algorythm" of the cube, so i expect that once these hit the market in personal computing, we're going to have alot of fun.

    But, what if the Government gets it first?
    Ha! not likely, they are grossly underfunded for this kind of venture. After the creation of the Nuclear bomb and subsequent Neutron bomb, the gov let go all the Physisits and Quantum theorist. Contrary to ignorant public opinion, Quantum computing CANNOT be achieved by electric/computer engineers. It is the acedemic sector that will create the practical application first.

    So what will happen to encryption?
    Well, now encryptions are going to be 128 x 10^9 bit. That puts non-quantum computers SOL in cracking. Because even if your comp hit the key in the first 1% of the possible combinations, it would be over a million years.

    Just Food for Thought

  10. #10
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    Encryption is a process that is made to be reversed, and it will (legally or not) Even if it takes that person a year trying to break the encryption, it will be done... When people make stronger and stronger keys, other people make faster and more powerful computers to break that encryption.... So in other words, there is no such thing as a perfect encryption

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