SHA256 implementation in Java from CryptoHeaven
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Thread: SHA256 implementation in Java from CryptoHeaven

  1. #1

    Lightbulb SHA256 implementation in Java from CryptoHeaven

    For those of you looking for an implementation of SHA-256 in Java, I have one freely downloadable with source code at http://www.cryptoheaven.com/Download/Download.htm
    Look for a file DigestCalc.jar at the bottom of the page. It is an executable JAR so you can run it with standard 'java -jar DigestCalc.jar' command.

    This Java utility will calculate hash using its built in SHA256 algorithm, as well as other standard algorithms available from your default JCE provider. If you have the JRE from Sun, you most likely already have MD5 and SHA1 algorithms available which can also be used by the utility.

    Marcin.


    _______________________________________________
    Secure online storage and file sharing http://www.CryptoHeaven.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member The Old Man's Avatar
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    Interesting. several companies are breaking into the security-provider field. in fact, that's where Zimmerman went. Visited this one and it seems to have an entire plate of features; email, chat, file exchange, a GUI interface, free version and pro version... Then there is ziplip, hushmail and a few others. most of us have SSL email on our domain servers as well as PGP (etc) encryption and secure signature hooked into our desktop email clients.... Whadaya wanna bet most of us don't need it at all, it's just a challenge and something to learn?

  3. #3
    Senior Member The Old Man's Avatar
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    P.S. And, whadayawanna bet that the corporate and government people who should actually *be* using these tools don't have the foggiest idea of how to make them work even if their SysOp tells them it's available and how to work it? 'Scuse the P.S., please.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    You know, SHA-256 is useful for other things other than just digital signatures and other identity verification. One could use it to create a 256-bit key for AES or something by entering a "password" of any length. If they made a version that gave 1024- or 2048-bit output, I or someone else could write a program that uses the algorithm to produce secure keys for symmetricblock ciphers. In fact, I'm working on something like that right now.

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