Migrating a business from MS to Linux
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Thread: Migrating a business from MS to Linux

  1. #1
    The Iceman Cometh
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    Migrating a business from MS to Linux

    I am unsure whether this is the right forum for this question, but it was the best I could find.

    Due to new Microsoft licensing issues, a few of the businesses I consult for would like to migrate from Microsoft environments, to pure Linux environments. I have done a great deal of research on this subject over the past few weeks, and am still unsure whether I can make this decision for the companies. I have a great deal of Linux/UNIX experience, but only after years of hard work.

    What are your thoughts on dumping Microsoft within a corporate environment and adopting Linux? The learning curve is quite steep, but do you think it would be possible to create a network, usable by all employees (many who are not technically inclined), and compatible with other businesses which may still be running only Microsoft products?

    The companies each have a wide assortment of needs (including file sharing servers, gateways, SQL servers, web servers, etc.). I have the knowledge and experience in setting these up, but do not want to hinder the businesses by helping them migrate to an environment they will not be able to use.

    Any thoughts you have upon this would be greatly appreciated. If you need any more information, I will be more than happy to provide it.

    AJ

  2. #2
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    Servers can be replaced by Linux, domain controllers can be easily replaced by E-smith server, but workstations will have to run windows, it's a hell of a job to have all the people who do administration etc to switch to a Linux enviroment, besides not all programs are available for linux (yet)

  3. #3
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    I would have to agree w/ Leviatan, it's really not a question of whether you can implement it, it's more of a question of 'can the company adapt?'. I know the company I work for would have no way to do it (workstation wise), every program they use is either DOS based or migrating towards a 32 bit Windows environment, they would have to pay the companies, that they already paid a good sum of money, to work on a port to nix, or scrap what they use and use a nix developer. not impossible, just not worth the money, to them anyway. With linux as it is now, you can only replace things that wouldn't effect me, lol (Joe Schmoe workin' the keys), the average employee in companies don't want to have to learn anything new, IMHO, anywho. . .but server side, etc., hell yeah, as long as the transition is transparent to the actual user of the proggies.

  4. #4
    Senior Member cwk9's Avatar
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    Switching a business to Linux is a big decision with big risks. You might want to try a little test group with a few employees. One big question is will having a computer that runs free software offset the lost productivity and all the new training that the employees will now need.?
    Its not software piracy. Im just making multiple off site backups.

  5. #5
    The Iceman Cometh
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    I see everyone's point. With at least one company, I already committed to setting up servers running Linux a couple weeks ago, and so far, we haven't run into any problems.

    As for cwk9's question... that's a very good point. I didn't think of it that way. The workstations have been my largest concern from the start, due to the learning curve and availability of specific software (or, in this case, lack thereof).

    What about (throwing this out) holding out on the workstations until LindowsOS is officially released? I've always been cautious about upgrading soon after something is released, but so far, in my experience, the sneak preview has run most of the Windows applications I use on daily basis. Any thoughts on doing this?

    AJ

  6. #6
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    I switched my personal workstation (admin station) and 80 % of my machines to Linux. I still have a couple of Win XP Pro machines and Win2000 on the network. Even a 98SE workstation for public access/demo purposes. The migration went well. A few little glitches here and there. The main problems I had were that I have to use MS Publisher with some clients and can't use the files or forms from it on Tux. Also I have a few little glitches in authoring PDF documents such as fill in forms I created in Acrobat on the Win32 platform. All my spreadsheets, docs, databases etc... did fine. I still would'nt recomend going with Tux workstations though. Remeber that most end users are used to the ease of Windows point and click. Even though most of us use and prefer Tux. Lets face it. It's not that user freindly to the average user and has a higher learning curve than windows. I have a fealing that this will change soon after MS bends everyone over..........
    The COOKIE TUX lives!!!!
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  7. #7
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    hi

    you should also consider the fact that there are also many people who are not comfortable In ANY operating system, including windows, and are able to use computers only for the most basic of tasks or for what they have been trained to do. if you set up an intranet interface (based on a linux server, and linux workstations) in which users are able to do most things via http (and if you or someone else can code all the scripts and programming required for such tasks) then the learning curve shouldn't be that difficult, as long as users learn what to click on, and what to type, etc... that is how my work is starting to operate.

    with linux workstations, you also won't have to worry so much about them getting trashed by users, e.g. accidentally downloading suspect microsoft-office attachments which run suspect vb scripts / users accidentally formatting the c drive / users and workstations that get windows networking problems / and so on and so on.

    just my 2c worth.

    regards,
    mark.
    \'hi, welcome to *****. if you would like to speak to an operator, please hang up now.\'
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  8. #8
    Antionline Quitter..Srsly
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    well INHO if IBM did it why cant ya? ...though they only did it for servers not workstations i htink that maybe the best option for now until ppl get the idea of linux u might want to suggest workshops that u will be willing to teach at a small(:P) charge ...that way after a year of workshops the change wont be so drastic to the change
    \"\"A weak mind is like a microscope, which magnifies trifling things but cannot receive great ones.\" G.K. Chesterton, 19th-century English essayist and poet\"

  9. #9
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    adven I would suggest you to advise your customers to run a small pilot with one linux server to test everything, but again there is no way you can get the (l) users to switch their workstations to Linux. Don't let the linux extremists tell you that bs story, sysadmins allready have a shitload of work, and more user support will stress them out.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted here by Leviatan


    ....sysadmins allready have a shitload of work, and more user support will stress them out.


    too true!



    regards,

    mark.
    \'hi, welcome to *****. if you would like to speak to an operator, please hang up now.\'
    * click *

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