Quick Question
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Thread: Quick Question

  1. #1
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    Question Quick Question

    Is it illegal to Scan ports? I know this is such a newbie question but, I heard somewhere that it was and I wasnt to sure. Thanks for reading this
    ~Apollovega~
    \"I will control my Destiny Terenica...I\'m not afraid.\"

  2. #2
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    No, it's not illegal at all to scan ports.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for an extremly fast reply!!
    ~Apollovega~
    \"I will control my Destiny Terenica...I\'m not afraid.\"

  4. #4
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    depending on the isp, they can close your account
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

  5. #5
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    Scanning ports may be a legal activity but it is sure to violate your Terms Of Service, it is considered a malicious act by the major isp's. The legality and interpretation of this activity is discussed here.(kind of dry reading but nonetheless informative and well worth a read)
    http://grove.ufl.edu/~techlaw/vol6/Preston.html

    just my .02

  6. #6
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    The ISP may reserve the right to close your account, though it is not illegal. Read your AUP, EULA, or whatever you would like to call it, it's more than likely covered somewhere. On the same token, it may not be listed in the AUP at all, though if someone were to complain about your IP showing in their firewall logs, then you are most certainly looking at some downtime whilst you search for a new ISP. Tread carefully as your ISP admin may not care for that kind of activity.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  7. #7
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    It realy depends on the ISP. Such as Charter for example. They expressly forbid it. This is from their TOS:

    2. NO ILLEGAL OR FRAUDULENT USE
    You agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, Charter Pipeline to violate any applicable federal, state, local or international laws. You agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, Charter Pipeline to commit a crime or fraud, or to plan, encourage or help others to commit a crime or fraud, including but not limited to engaging in a pyramid scheme, a ponzi scheme or sending chain letters.

    7. NO “HACKING"
    You agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, Charter Pipeline to access the accounts of others or to attempt to penetrate security measures of Charter Pipeline’s or other computer systems (“hacking”) or to cause a disruption of service to other on-line users. You agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, tools designed for compromising network security, such as password guessing programs, cracking tools, packet sniffers or network probing tools.

    8. NO SYSTEM DISRUPTION
    You agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, Charter Pipeline to disrupt Charter's network or computer equipment owned by other Charter Pipeline customers. You also agree that you will not use, nor allow others to use, Charter Pipeline to disrupt other Internet Service Providers or services, including but not limited to by e-mail bombing or the use of mass mailing programs.

    Most ISP's are about the same. Just call them and ask. It' never hurts. I have a commercial Charter account and I called them and told them what I do for a living and that I would be using security tools across my network and on my clients networks remotely. So they said thats fine. So I get it in writing from my clients. I draw up a non-disclosure and permission agreement between me and my clients to cover my butt.
    The COOKIE TUX lives!!!!
    Windows NT crashed,I am the Blue Screen of Death.
    No one hears your screams.


  8. #8
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    A very good question, one I did not know the answer to myself till I read it somewhere. Many system administrators will look at it as a posible upcoming atack. So as a part of the TOS agreement they may state thier conditions of such an activity. I have hered of a case where someone had post scanned a server, they were then contacted and asked for a reason for port scanning the server. If you don't provide a vailid reason, or your reason leads them to be suspisious of illegal activity they may very well take away your acount, or even take legal action.
    In snatches, they learn something of the wisdom
    which is of good, and more of the mere knowledge which is of evil. But must I know what must not come, for I shale become those of knowledgedome. Peace~

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