Encription
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Thread: Encription

  1. #1
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    Encription

    How secure is a hard disk encripted with AES 128bit encription found on pgp 7? can any one unscramble it with out the pass phrase?

  2. #2
    Now, RFC Compliant! Noia's Avatar
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    Nope.....well...never say never....
    The NSA might, but sum 1 with a 98 box won't have a chance in hell...

    - Noia
    With all the subtlety of an artillery barrage / Follow blindly, for the true path is sketchy at best. .:Bring OS X to x86!:.
    Og ingen kan minnast dei linne drag i dronningas andlet den fagre dag Då landet her kvilte i heilag fred og alle hadde kjærleik å elske med.

  3. #3
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    Thanx Noia !! i can now sleep easy

  4. #4
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    The only way to break AES128 is to use a bunch of supercomputers, unless an internal weakness is found in the algorithm. Combined with PGP it should be pretty secure. How large are the keys for that version of PGP?

  5. #5
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    128bit and 256bit are the two options for encripting HDs

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by scoundral
    Thanx Noia !! i can now sleep easy

    lol what are you hiding ?!

  7. #7
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    my bank accout details, a few music demos done by local bands, mp3s (for backup purposes) course work

  8. #8
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  9. #9
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    The NSA can definitely crack 128/256-bit PGP; I don't know about AES since it's pretty new. I would upgrade to RSA with 1024 or 2048-bit keys and keep the AES also. For extra security, if you don't want to upgrade an of your algorithms, you could encrypt the files multiple times-- encrypt it once with one key, then encrypt a second time with another key, et cetera-- this is the equivalent of using very large keys. Using AES to encrypt the same file eight different times is the equivalent of using a 1024-bit key. You could also develop software that does this for you for a given number of iterations.
    That's how 3DES gets its security. DES has 56-bit keys and you can crack it in no time on a fast enough computer, but 3DES has the equivalent of 168-bit keys and is much more secure.

  10. #10
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    Didn't Evi Nemeth crack the DES encryption algorithm with some kind of supercomputer? (She's a co-author of the Unix System Administration Handbook http://www.admin.com) I don't have my book in front of me, so I can't look up the answer. I know I read it in there somewhere, though. If she can crack it, the algorithm isn't 100% secure, but for most uses (up to industrial-strength) it seems practical.
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