Finally! Lindows PCs reviewed
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  1. #1
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    Finally! Lindows PCs reviewed

    Somebody finally reviewed those microtel wal-mart PCs. I was looking forward to this as I still remember how annoyed I was when I tried a beta version.
    For this review, Microtel provided us with a AMD Duron 850 MHz system, with 10 GB Maxtor hard drive, 128 MB of memory, and 52x Samsung CDROM drive. Sound and video are integrated on the motherboard. Sound is supported through the VIA chipset, while the Trident Cyber Blade video shares main memory to do its tasks. The modem is a 56K Lucent software modem, but LindowsOS already has the appropriate driver installed. Absent from the system is a floppy drive, which I suppose is less than useful for a system that will upgrade its software from the Internet.
    No floppy drive? Man, that sucks. I don't care where the software comes from but floppy drives are universal, I would never want a computer without one.
    Surprisingly, the basic LindowsOS fits in a mere 450 MB on the disk. It features a KDE desktop with a selection of icons and menus which should make most Windows users feel right at home. Icons are activated via a double-click, which was peculiar to me as a Linux user, but this action should feel comfortable for most of the intended buyers of this system
    Just confirms that Lindows is just a rip off of windows mixed with a bad linux distro.
    So far, very nice. But then X Windows came up. Unfortunately, the monitor I normally use for testing is not a multisync monitor. This apparently was a problem for the system as configured. As a result, the screen became entirely unreadable. Faced with this, I decided to do what any novice user would do: I powered the machine off. Yes, I could have gone to one of the text consoles, logged in as root, and issued the shutdown command, but very few Wal-Mart buyers would know about that
    I wonder why that is. Can anybody shed some light on that? I don't normally use one myself.
    I try a fourth package, only to find that my Click-N-Run test has now expired. I have had my three free test downloads (even though two failed) and now I will have to pay $99 to get full access to the Click-N-Run software warehouse.
    Considering people have to pay $99 for full access to click-n-run it seems like a rip off if you have to constantly keep try to download software. Seems like a hassle.
    Oh no ... a rescue CD
    Enough said. The rest of the article can be located here http://newsforge.com/newsforge/02/07...4.shtml?tid=23

  2. #2
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    No floppy drive? Perhaps they learned something from Apple.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  3. #3
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    Yea, but those new apples are amazing with their superdrive. A cd/cd-rw/dvd/dvd-rw is really cool. Who doesn't want the ability to make their own dvds and cds? Apple is much better than lindows.

  4. #4
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    No doubt. I've thought about buying a new Mac at times, if only for OS X being paired up with those superdrives. I think apple has done well with their newes OS, now for the glorified desklamp they call an IMac, there is a little something to be desired.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  5. #5
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    With apple, how does their OS install? Does it come on a cd? I have never heard of it being sold or pirated or anything so I was wondering. Because how do people recover if something goes wrong on their apple?

  6. #6
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    Yeh, the OS comes on a CD. I don't recall the key sequence you have to use to force the machine to boot from CD, but it's really quite easy to reinstall the Mac OS if you know what's up. When you boot from the OS disk, it does most of the work for you. I think there were only 2-3 questions asked of a user before the OS actually installed. Once installed, reboot to fully activate the extensions, and work complete. Now you just do the user config process. In comparision to other OS's, this has it's advantages. One thing I've never really looked into with it though is networked installs, or even fully automated installs. I guess if I would really like to know I'll have to buy one to find out.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  7. #7
    The last Mac I used was the SI made in the mid-90's, and never messed with one since. In Fortune magazine, there was a big article on the new iMac which looks really, really cool. I as well as a lot of people know Macs are better, and has always been a step ahead of the game. Since nobody in my circle owns a Mac, nor does any school in my area have a Mac, I would love to see one in action. Oh well. We are in a Microsoft world.

    As for Lindows, if I want Windows, I'll use Windows. If I want *NIX, I'll use *NIX. It's kinda silly to see a hybrid IMHO.

  8. #8
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    My interest in Macs has grown considerably since Apple's decision to go with the *nix platform (FreeBSD, I believe) in OS 10. I haven't had the opprotunity to try one out yet, but from what I have heard/seen it looks pretty sweet.

    The only thing stopping me from buying a Mac is the significant difference in price between their hardware and PC hardware, as well as the fact that Mac hardware cannot be upgraded to the degree that PC hardware can . I would rather spend ~$1200 and build my own (with my choice of hardware) than spend the big bucks for their G4 powered Macs. Although, I wouldn't mind a shiny new Ibook dual booting OS 10 and PPC Linux.

    --Sudo

  9. #9
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    Yup, OS 10 is based on unix for stability is what I read in a brochure. Does anybody know if that means MACs allow raw socket access to a user? I was wonderin.

  10. #10
    Kwiep
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    <quote>
    So far, very nice. But then X Windows came up. Unfortunately, the monitor I normally use for testing is not a multisync monitor. This apparently was a problem for the system as configured. As a result, the screen became entirely unreadable. Faced with this, I decided to do what any novice user would do: I powered the machine off. Yes, I could have gone to one of the text consoles, logged in as root, and issued the shutdown command, but very few Wal-Mart buyers would know about that

    I wonder why that is. Can anybody shed some light on that? I don't normally use one myself.
    </quote>

    x-windows is the graphical interface of linux, so you can have some windows like interface (with windows). Without it you could only use 16 colours or tekst only. If you can't set it up properly (like I do), you will have to have some linux knowledge to repair that...
    Double Dutch

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