I want to learn!
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Thread: I want to learn!

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Mar 2002
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    Question I want to learn!

    Hello all,

    Definite newbie question. I really want to learn more about IT without going back to school. I have already bought some books and am reading them as I get a chance (Norton's New Inside the PC, Norton's Guide to Upgrading and Repairing PCs, the Hacking Exposed series, an A+ Certification guide book, and a Teach Yourself in 24 Hours book on TCP/IP). I also want to put a Linux OS (probably SuSE 8.0) on my system and learn as much as I can from others willing to share their knowledge (web sites such as this one).

    I am really busy at work right now and I don't have much time to do all this stuff at once. I just wanted some suggestions from people that have already been through this on how best to go about this. I am especially interested in security and networks, but I figure I have to learn the inner workings of desktop PCs first.

    Thanks in advance, and this is the most informational site I've found.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    May 2002
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    15

    Use Redhat

    Ive never used SuSe but i know that if ur a newb u really might want to try redhat 7.3 because its easy to instal and VERY user friendly. as for the other stuff im still a newb.. sorry.
    I feel deprived because microsoft blinded me of a true OS like linux by hiding windows with \"easy\" features and a simple to use install interface. its OS\'s like linux that make this world a better place.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Jun 2002
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    Hi..

    Start from the inner working of desktop is a good idea to build strong fundamental. If u really interested in security, I would suggest your next step to computer network before u jump to security. Build your knowledge with TCP/IP and keep on reading the Hacking Exposed.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2002
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    To be honest with you I've never understood people that take the A+ and the like. Why you wanna fiddle with your hardware anyway? Changeing discs, processors and ordinary maintenance work can be done without something like A+. Trust me, I know **** about hardware and I've never found it to be a problem.

    What I'm saying is that you're wasting your time by learning the inner workings of your PC. I'm a professional programmer and have been so for the last four years. I've never once opened up my work computer. If something needs changeing I call for a sysadmin a tech-wonk or someone qualified.

    I do think learning TCP/IP is a good thing though. I guess it's the security scene you're trying to get into?

    Cheers,
    Mankan

    \"The purpose of abstraction is not to be vague, but to create a new semantic level in which one can be absolutely precise.\"
    - Edsger Dijkstra

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    Jul 2002
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    Yeah, read up on TCP. Sams publishing makes good books for learning loads of computer related things, the books are usually aroung $40 so be willing to pay. Focus on things that make up the internet first, the basics I guess. Protocols are a great starting off point. And you do not have to learn the inner workings of a PC to become involved in IT. You really need t specifiy, there are so many possible jobs for somebody interested in IT. Everything has a branch, you have to specify a little.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2001
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    Learning a bit about hardware is just good because it's really not that difficult subject. I have changed motherboards and graphics cards and stuff, all you really need is a screw driver and a steady enough hand (or two ). And if you get a wise enough box, you don't even need the screw driver.

    Mankan, you'd save a lot with the tech support costs if you just bought a book and learned to change your own hardware...

    Oh, and welcome to AO, MadBadger!
    Q: Why do computer scientists confuse Christmas and Halloween?
    A: Because Oct 31 = Dec 25

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Aug 2001
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    Learning about shell scripting and pearl can help too.
    Alternate realities celebrate reality. If you cant handle the reality your in, then you wont be able to handle the one your attempting to escape to.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2002
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    I agree. Perl is a good language to start with if you're on *nix. It's also a nifty language to show off your elite TCP-skills once you feel you know what you're doing.
    Mankan

    \"The purpose of abstraction is not to be vague, but to create a new semantic level in which one can be absolutely precise.\"
    - Edsger Dijkstra

  9. #9
    Banned
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    Jan 2002
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    although i'm still learning myself, what i've done is started learning various areas about computers it'll give me a bit of an idea of the computer and how they work in general, and try to gain expertise in one single area (hardware, networking, programming etc) and once you become proficient in one area start learning in another area that you're interested in, then...well you get the idea. learn the BASICS of each area if you can/want and then become good in just one area

  10. #10
    Banned
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    Jul 2002
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    For ease of use I'd say besides windows Ive never had anything install easier than mandrake.

    When I first started to install Linux I ran into problems with slackware suse and redhat but mandrake is dummy proof. Plus the default install will install a ton of programs and window managers that are either mostly useful or at least enjoyable.

    This way you don't have to immediately have to learn to get things configured AND learn to use RPM or learn to install source or binary's. You can just get it installed and have a semi-useful system without a whole lot of work. Then you can screw with the already installed programs otherwise you may be biting off more than you can chew.

    I did the same thing as you, started out by getting A+ and I wish I hadn't. The knowledge is useful, --but not that useful.

    IMHO I'd say don't sweat the hardware at first, just learn how the OS works cause most stuff is plug and play anyway and it all works in the same way, it does or it doesnt.

    Ooh, I forgot. As far as learning a programming language, I'd say learn shell scripting first and then perpahs move to Python. Python, in my opinion, is easier to get started with than perl, though admitedly I like perl better.

    You can install activepython from www.activestate.com on your windows box without any effort and start scripting quickly as activepython has enough documentation with the install to get going without having to purchase any perl books.

    One other suggestion: I love the O'reiley books but when I first got started I found that the O'reiley book "Learning Perl" was a little more obtuse than a green newbie may like. I have had friends that loved that book though. The important thing to note is that just because a certain book works for your buddy, it may be crappy for you as everyone learns differently.

    cachinga

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