RIAA Web site dos'ed

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Thread: RIAA Web site dos'ed

  1. #1
    Senior Member cwk9's Avatar
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    Smile RIAA Web site dos'ed

    I was surprised that no one posted this yet. Didnít fined anything in a search so drop me a pm if this has already be posted.

    Looks like someone took out the RIAA web site www.RIAA.org . No one claimed responsibility but we all know it was in retaliation for there proposed bill that would authorize copyright holders to begin "blocking, diverting or otherwise impairing" peer-to-peer networks" (dos attacks). Sounds like the RIAA need a little lesson in karma. What goes around comes around. I would like to go on record as saying this is one of the few dos attacks that I actually approve of.


    Read more here:
    http://rss.com.com/2100-1023-947072....feed&subj=news
    and here
    http://slashdot.org/articles/02/07/3...2.shtml?tid=99
    and even here
    http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1105-947101.html

  2. #2
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    Bound to happen, they must've known somebody would be annoyed with their tactics and strike back. Makes me think of that other attack on RIAA, that e-mail one. Ah well, not like they didn't ask for it/deserve it. I'm surprised they weren't more prepared for something like this.
    On Thursday, the RIAA endorsed a bill written by Rep. Howard Berman, D-Calif., that would authorize copyright holders to begin "blocking, diverting or otherwise impairing" peer-to-peer networks.
    Well, they better not touch IRC, 'cause if they do, they'll pay for it. IRC has all the good stuff, plus people with OC3 connections serve in IRC, a few of those could lag that site pretty badly. Plus IRC is a place where tons of hackers/crackers hang out.
    "Don't they have something better to do during the summer than hack our site?" asked the RIAA representative, who asked not to be identified. "Perhaps it at least took 10 minutes away from stealing music."
    Lol, well, weren't people saying that organizations like the RIAA already DoS networks? They pretend to be so innocent.

  3. #3
    Senior Member cwk9's Avatar
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    I don't think they care about the stuff on irc because it's relatively low volume compared to kazaa and other p2p software.
    Its not software piracy. Iím just making multiple off site backups.

  4. #4
    What made the CNet article interesting was

    "Don't they have something better to do during the summer than hack our site?" asked the RIAA representative, who asked not to be identified. "Perhaps it at least took 10 minutes away from stealing music."
    It's funny how some people think. They seem to glob crackers and pirates in the same catagory. Anyway, even if the cracker(s)were a pirate(s), it would not take any time away from downloading more music while setting up and executing a massive DoS (or DDoS) on a web server. Gimmee a break

    Also, kakisrule was right when he said

    Bound to happen, they must've known somebody would be annoyed with their tactics and strike back.
    However, two wrongs do not make a right, and it's just going to push this bill through that much quicker.

    [RANT]
    Of course I sympathize with the fact many, many people are pissed off because of the proposed bill and anti piracy has really gone out of hand with all of this, but we also have to remember we helped make this monster. I mean, many are not buying CD's, movies, or software anymore because broadband and KaZaA is so readily available now, and the industry is getting really mad about it.

    Now before others start jumping my ****, hear me out. Answers to this problem is not in an all-out war of the industry, pirates and crackers, but in some kind of compromise. Let's face it. Everybody likes things for free. Businessmen like to make money, lots of it. Now it seems we are at a stalemate, and it seems the only way things are going to work for the industry to squeeze the dollars they used to get is to start going around and deleting things without a warrant or due process. To me, they are no better than the people who DoS'ed their site in the first place, and they are just hypocrytical fools.

    So what goes around comes around, and two wrongs do not make a right on both the industry and the crackers. This whole war is pathetic. [/RANT]

    I said this once, and I will say it again. I am against piracy and think others deserve a living, but I do not condone greediness.

  5. #5
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    I don't think they care about the stuff on irc because it's relatively low volume compared to kazaa and other p2p software.
    Methinks you don't use IRC much for software trading, because IRC is one of the biggest sources of pirated software. IRC also has links to all the good FTPs. IRC channels are pretty well organized, you serve in a warez chan, then you access to things like distros and dumps which are places where people with high bandwidth connections, like T1 and OC3 serve all the newest files out to everybody who in return serves them in the main channel. And there are so many different IRC networks, dalnet, efnet, undernet, and criten are some of the bigger file sharing IRC networks. And movies and things are downloaded from there as well. plus viruses aren't as common because people fear reprisal since on most IRC networks you can find out the IP of a user.

  6. #6
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    "Don't they have something better to do during the summer than hack our site?" asked the RIAA representative, who asked not to be identified. "Perhaps it at least took 10 minutes away from stealing music."
    This coming from a group that is likely to invest a sizeable chunk of time and money into throwing down p2p networks through similar means.

    I don't necesarrily believe that illegal acts condone other illegal acts, but it is funny that they should put through the gauntlet.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  7. #7
    Old Fart
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    You reap what you sow....'nuff said
    Al
    It isn't paranoia when you KNOW they're out to get you...

  8. #8
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    I agree with allenb1963... spoofing (that's what I'll call the "empty files with a song title") is just another form of hacking and that (at least according to what I've read) is what the RIAA has been engaged in.

    There might be a better word for it, but I think my drift can be understood.

  9. #9
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    spoofing (that's what I'll call the "empty files with a song title") is just another form of hacking and that (at least according to what I've read) is what the RIAA has been engaged in
    I'm sorry, but I don't understand. Could anybody explain this to me in greater detail?

  10. #10
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    This whole debate has been fought and lost several times by the Record industry. They threw up a big fuss wasting money trying to hold back the new technology of the moment, be it cassettes, DATs, minidiscs, VHS, BETA, music videos, MTV and now P2P filesharing.

    This link was originally posted by allenb1963

    http://www.janisian.com/article-internet_debacle.html

    Read this page, even if its only a quick glance, as it gives valuble insight into the motives of the RIAA in their P2P smear campaign, and some sobering facts about the hyped up damage it does to "less-established artists." My favorite quote from the page is from a spokesperson for the now ex-presedent of NARAS, the company that does the grammys:

    Greene went on to say that "Many of the nominees here tonight, especially the new, less-established artists, are in immediate danger of being marginalized out of our business." Right. Any "new" artist who manages to make the Grammys has millions of dollars in record company money behind them. The "real" new artists aren't people you're going to see on national TV, or hear on most radio. They're people you'll hear because someone gave you a disc, or they opened at a show you attended, or were lucky enough to be featured on NPR or another program still open to playing records that aren't already hits.

    As to artists being "marginalized out of our business," the only people being marginalized out are the employees of our Enron-minded record companies, who are being fired in droves because the higher-ups are incompetent.
    The funny thing is that this is coming from an artist who had to deal first hand with the american music industry. See how disillusioned it left her!

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