good compiler
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Thread: good compiler

  1. #1
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    good compiler

    Hello,

    I've been working with perl and python for a while now, so I'm not completely new at programming, but I'm ready to make the jump to c & c++, at which, I have 0 experience and as Ive only really explored interpreted languages, I dont know what compiler to bother learning to live with.

    My question:
    Which IDE/compiler do you all prefer for Linux and windows? By that I mean, specifically which one do you folks actually like and enjoy using?

    I have downloaded Borland, Bloodshed, and Code Forge for linux. As I'm new I have no idea what makes one compiler better than another or even what I should ask for in a IDE/compiler. I have gcc installed on my Linux box but admitedly dont know how to use it, is gcc just used for make? If any of you have any valuable input on which one you like best, I'd like to see what you have to say.

    thanks
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  2. #2
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    Re: good compiler

    Originally posted here by cachinga
    My question:
    Which IDE/compiler do you all prefer for Linux and windows? By that I mean, specifically which one do you folks actually like and enjoy using?
    For windows (if you don't mind spending money): Borland or MS Visual C++

    There are some free compilers for win32, but I have no experience using them.

    For Linux: gcc and g++

    For a Linux IDE, I recommend checking out KDEvelop. Or, as an alternative, use VIM with the syntax highlighting on. Then, use a seperate console(or xterm in xwindows) for building your source.

    --Sudo
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  3. #3
    The compilers you already mentioned should work just fine. I have Bloodshed Dev 5 Beta, and is shaping up to be a great IDE. Also, KDevelop is also a very nice IDE for Linux and developing KDE apps. As for others, there are so many ranging from free to hundreds even thousands of dollars that it is hard to say what is the best....

    regards
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  4. #4
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    I dont have a lot have experience in c and c++, but i do know some. So, I also use Bloodshed.
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  5. #5
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    for windows i use MS VC++. if you have the money(or connections at work or whatever), i'd go for MS Visual Studio .Net enterprise(or is it pro....they keep changing their naming conventions on me, just the most expensive one ). i find it actually quite easy to use. especially when it comes to debuging. i admit i didnt try much, but i just dont get borlan's debuger(couldnt even figure out how to work it right).
    -8-

    There are 10 types of people in this world: those who understand binary, and those who dont.
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  6. #6
    GreekGoddess
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    Bloodshed is great for the complete newbie. (ME!) There are currently a lot of bugs in the latest release (beta, duh), so I would recommend downloading the release before that. It seemed to run a lot smoother and didn't crash too much while coding.

    I find the GUI easy to use, as I prefer not to compile in DOS.
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  7. #7
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    win - bloodshed, VC++ 6, Borland Turbo 3.0, lccwin32
    linux - KDEvelop, gcc
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  8. #8
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    Yeah, I use Bloodshed Dev-C++ for Windows (even though sometimes it sucks), and gcc for Linux.
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  9. #9
    The Iceman Cometh
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    I have to agree with most people on this... For Windows, I recommend MS Visual C++ (if you have the money, go for Visual Studio... you don't need the Enterprise edition as 8*Ball suggested, since that'll run you *way* too much money, but the Pro edition should be just right for you).

    For Linux, I would go with gcc or g++. Most other compilers I have used on Unix and Linux are pretty worthless compared to these two.

    AJ
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  10. #10
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    For windows I find MSVC++ to be great. And for Linux I use gcc as well...
    If you are looking for a phun compiler you can learn on, I would suggest the Borland Commandline version. Its free but you have to register with borland on their website.
    Borland compiler <-----

    -- Woops! I see that you already have borland

    -- Watcom has a nice free/open-source compiler from what I have heard.. I have not used it myself but would love to hear about it if you ever use it.
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