Kernel Hacking
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Kernel Hacking

  1. #1
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Beverwijk Netherlands
    Posts
    2,535

    Kernel Hacking

    For people interested in makeing their linux box faster better cooler..
    the big Kernel Hacking howto is the one to read for u.
    I found it helpfull. Finaly my cheap-ass tv-card is supported by linux.


    http://www.kernelhacking.org/docs/ke...WTO/index.html
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
    When in Russia, pet a PETSCII.

    Get your ass over to SLAYRadio the best station for C64 Remixes !

  2. #2
    JinX
    Do you really find that a kernel that is compiled is noticably faster?
    I used to build my own when I was running SuSE 6.2 to address problems with the RAID card but now I find the standard kernels actually run well.

  3. #3
    Senior Member problemchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    551
    I think it is. Yes, the standard kernels run fine, but they're bloated. Back in the day, distros came with only a bare-bones kernel that got the system up and running, and that was about it. Now, we have all these distros trying to go mainstream, so they're compiling in everything but the kitchen sink to try and work with as much hardware as possible out of the box.

    Removing undeeded funtionality will make the kernel smaller and faster, and code that is compiled directly into the kernel, as opposed to a module, will execute faster because the kernel doesn't have to stop and load/unload the module. I think there is a noticeable performance improvement in a custom kernel.

    Then, of course, there are the security implications of removing unneeded options and disabling loadable module support, because modules give an attacker an easy avenue to insert malicious code into a running kernel.

    So yes, there are good reasons to do it.
    Do what you want with the girl, but leave me alone!

  4. #4
    I remember when it was necessary to to modify CFLAGS and HOSTCFLAGS in the make file to optimise the kernel for Pentium Processors but these kernels are now standard.
    I'm never sure if the modules are hazards, and the logic, don't load it if you don't need it, seems compelling. The monolithic kernel locks you into a moment of time, and my luck always works as follows. The driver that I need gets updated 30 seconds after I build the kernel.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    65
    The original post had nothing to do with "compiling a custom kernel." Kernel hacking is writing code and developing drivers for unsupported hardware and/or improving existing drivers.

    code that is compiled directly into the kernel, as opposed to a module, will execute faster because the kernel doesn't have to stop and load/unload the module.
    I disagree. The kernel doesn't load/unload any modules. Unless, you have enabled automatic module loading support (or whatever the name is), and in that case it will automatically load a module if it is needed. Such an example would be when you start X-windows and the kernel automatically loads your DRM module.

    In fact, having modules could actually speed things up. If you don't have a use for a certain peice of hardware at the time, then what is the point of wasting your memory with uneeded drivers?

    --Sudo

  6. #6
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Beverwijk Netherlands
    Posts
    2,535
    Indeed, I manualy had to change a bttv-module to get the tuner of my television-card working.
    I had a lot of help from the HOWTO above..

    as for compiling ur own kernel..

    that is ALWAYS faster..

    not only less bloated, also optimized for ur gear..

    I am a slackware user and usualy don't even download the .tgz slack-packs..

    Stick with the source and you'll allways outrun any .rpm based app..
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
    When in Russia, pet a PETSCII.

    Get your ass over to SLAYRadio the best station for C64 Remixes !

  7. #7
    Thanks for the link Jinx, I can actually benefit from it. Im thinking of working on my own of it.. Till then, it's strickly my VisualBasic stuff.

  8. #8
    We had started the over haul of the Mylex Raid card driver, which back in the SuSE 6.2 days had to be compiled into the kernel if you wanted YAST to work.
    By the time we were into our 6th or 7th build, having hacked on the device driver for 2 weeks- Freshmeat annouces a new driver. A RedHat -rpm. (Dandelion comes through)
    Download the RedHat iso's and we are on our way.
    This seems to be the hackers problem. The production kernel is announced, within 8 months the source is updated 18 - 19 times. This time out (the 2.4 kernel) the Grub loader had problems with the Mylex controller, no one here even thought that hacking the driver was a good idea. Use lilo and wait, it will get fixed (It was)

    We play with the odd numbered kernels to get a feel for what is coming and tweaking is always fun BUT unless you do nothing else the new kernels just come to quickly.

  9. #9
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Beverwijk Netherlands
    Posts
    2,535
    so true,
    usualy the kernels update too d4mn fast...
    and waiting a bit or fondeling with other software solutions works better.
    unless u use "exotic" hardware, most companies only bring out (closed source) windows drivers..
    so then ur on your own..
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
    When in Russia, pet a PETSCII.

    Get your ass over to SLAYRadio the best station for C64 Remixes !

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    65
    Originally posted here by netman4ttm
    Download the RedHat iso's and we are on our way.
    That seems like a lot of work when all you should need to do is install Redhat's package manager... not the whole distro.

    Originally posted here by the_JinX
    most companies only bring out (closed source) windows drivers..
    so then ur on your own..
    Thankfully that's slowly changing. I am looking forward to the day when I can buy any hardware I want without worrying whether or not it will work in Linux.

    --Sudo

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides