The worlds most viscous fluid
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: The worlds most viscous fluid

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    472

    The worlds most viscous fluid

    I came across this interesting article from the University of Queensland, Australia. It's about this substance that seems like it's rock, but it's actually fluid.

    The first Professor of Physics at the University of Queensland, Professor Thomas Parnell, began an experiment in 1927 to illustrate that everyday materials can exhibit quite surprising properties. The experiment demonstrates the fluidity and high viscosity of pitch, a derivative of tar once used for waterproofing boats. At room temperature pitch feels solid - even brittle - and can easily be shattered with a blow from a hammer (see the RealVideo® clip below). It's quite amazing then, to see that pitch at room temperature is actually fluid!
    The professor made an experiment and but the pitch inside a container with a hole in the bottom, to see if it would drip. Since the start of the experiment (1927) there have been 7 drops of pitch from the container. That's one drop every 10 years!

    On this page you can even see a video (in relplayer format) about the experiment: http://www.physics.uq.edu.au/pitchdrop/pitchdrop.shtml
    ---
    proactive

  2. #2
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Beverwijk Netherlands
    Posts
    2,534
    did you know glass is liquid too

    but instead of 10 years it takes over a thousand years for a drop to come off you monitor !
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
    When in Russia, pet a PETSCII.

    Get your ass over to SLAYRadio the best station for C64 Remixes !

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    244

    Re: The worlds most viscous fluid

    Nice post!
    Did some google about glass is liquid http://www.ccmr.cornell.edu/IRG-GLAS...-disguised.pdf
    i m gone,thx everyone for so much fun and good info.
    cheers and good bye

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    472
    Originally posted here by the_JinX
    did you know glass is liquid too

    but instead of 10 years it takes over a thousand years for a drop to come off you monitor !
    I'm not gonna wait for that. I spend too much time in front of the monitor already.
    ---
    proactive

  5. #5
    Now, RFC Compliant! Noia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,210
    hmmm....drooopy window's....
    With all the subtlety of an artillery barrage / Follow blindly, for the true path is sketchy at best. .:Bring OS X to x86!:.
    Og ingen kan minnast dei linne drag i dronningas andlet den fagre dag Då landet her kvilte i heilag fred og alle hadde kjærleik å elske med.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Unl3Ashed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    103
    I guess that sounds more good for me, cause I'm a mechanical enginner.
    Thanks proactive
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    - Albert Einstein

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    748
    can't even spell your own title..

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    442
    Interesting post, things that are not very elastic are always neat to experiment with. But if you want to start talking about glass, then you minus well start talking about everything else, since technically everything has a tendency to return to its orginal state. Wouldn't that be a site, not only seeing the glass drip off of your monitor, but seeing your monitor itself melt away .

    {Just a little add on about the glass : In some old european castles the windows that have remained intact, are actually noticably larger on the bottom due to the fact that they are 'melting' away.}

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8
    it would take much less than 1000 years for me to start dripping!
    there are only two things that are universal hydrogen and stupidity-frank zappa

  10. #10
    Senior Member SodaMoca5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    236
    I really enjoyed this article and experiment probably because it spanned so much time. After reading the article on glass too I wondered it scientists had ever viewed the atomic structure of the pitch. Is it random (erg liquid) or is it ordered (ergo Solid). If the former we have the slow dripping of a very solid liquid. If the latter we have the even more interesting proposition of a slightly liquid solid.

    Not to dispute the other posts but according to the end of the article on glass researchers said it would not drip since the bonds overpowered any liquid traits at room temperature. The statement about the castles is very interesting (I believe I have heard it before) and I believe true especially since throughout summers castle's windows are rarely at "room temperature" but actually quite a bit hotter. I wonder how much it would cost to get a 1000 year warranty on my monitor to replace it when it drips.

    One final question, which is faster dripping pitch or M$ activity to really tighten security? Trick question, dripping pitch actually exists.

    Anyway thanks for an interesting post.
    SodaMoca5
    \"We are pressing through the sphincter of assholiness\"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •