Hotmail message
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Thread: Hotmail message

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2002

    Hotmail message

    Hey, did anybody else notice that when you send a message to a user who has surpassed their storage limit, the message refers to the person as a "him". Kind of weird. I mean, how easy would it be to use their instead of him or her? And while I think there should be limits to political correctness, I just figured a large corportation would take special care to please everybody. Did anybody else notice this?

  2. #2
    Leftie Linux Lover the_JinX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Beverwijk Netherlands

    We don't use hotmail,
    becouse they suck !
    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI.
    When in Russia, pet a PETSCII.

    Get your ass over to SLAYRadio the best station for C64 Remixes !

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    chek this url,........ kid

  4. #4
    AO Curmudgeon rcgreen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Until very recently, all persons of unspecified or unknown gender
    were referred to as "he, him" etc. This was the textbook English I learned
    as a child. So it isn't wierd at all, perhaps becoming obsolecent, but still
    just as good as any alternative, IMO.
    I came in to the world with nothing. I still have most of it.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002

    Proper grammar

    using "their" to reference a single person's anything is just as gramatically incorrect! The word "their" is intended a group's possesions.


    Usage Note: Traditionally the pronouns he, him, and his have been used as generic or gender-neutral singular pronouns, as in A novelist should write about what he knows best and No one seems to take any pride in his work anymore. Since the early 20th century, however, this usage has come under increasing criticism for reflecting and perpetuating gender stereotyping. ·Defenders of the traditional usage have argued that the masculine pronouns he, his, and him can be used generically to refer to men and women. This analysis of the generic use of he is linguistically doubtful. If he were truly a gender-neutral form, we would expect that it could be used to refer to the members of any group containing both men and women. But in fact the English masculine form is an odd choice when it refers to a female member of such a group. There is something plainly disconcerting about sentences such as Each of the stars of As Good As It Gets [i.e., Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt] won an Academy Award for his performance. In this case, the use of his forces the reader to envision a single male who stands as the representative member of the group, a picture that is at odds with the image that comes to mind when we picture the stars of As Good As It Gets. Thus he is not really a gender-neutral pronoun; rather, it refers to a male who is to be taken as the representative member of the group referred to by its antecedent. The traditional usage, then, is not simply a grammatical convention; it also suggests a particular pattern of thought. ·It is clear that many people now routinely construct their remarks to avoid generic he, usually using one of two strategies: changing to the plural, so they is used (which is often the easiest solution) or using compound and coordinate forms such as he/she or he or she (which can be cumbersome in sustained use). In some cases, the generic pronoun can simply be dropped or changed to an article with no change in meaning. The sentence "A writer who draws on personal experience for material should not be surprised if reviewers seize on that fact" is complete as it stands and requires no pronoun before the word material. The sentence Every student handed in his assignment is just as clear when written "Every student handed in the assignment." ·Not surprisingly, the opinion of the Usage Panel in such matters is mixed. While 37 percent actually prefer the generic his in the sentence A taxpayer who fails to disclose the source of ___ income can be prosecuted under the new law, 46 percent prefer a coordinate form like his or her; 7 percent felt that no pronoun was needed in the sentence; 2 percent preferred an article, usually the; and another 2 percent overturned tradition by advocating the use of generic her, a strategy that brings the politics of language to the reader's notice. Thus a clear majority of the Panel prefers something other than his. The writer who chooses to use generic he and its inflected forms in the face of the strong trend away from that usage may be viewed as deliberately calling attention to traditional gender roles or may simply appear to
    Mike Reilly

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