Networking DSL, Linux and Windows.
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Thread: Networking DSL, Linux and Windows.

  1. #1
    Developer Extraordinar
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    Networking DSL, Linux and Windows.

    Heya everyone. Here's the deal. I got got my new DSL at my dad's house (YAY!) And I'm hooking up two computers for it, here's the deal though;

    One is on Mandrake Linux 8.2 and One is on Windows ME/XP (What a combo eh...? ) Anyways, I know that I'll need a Hub and Ethernet wires, but I need to know how to set it out in Linux. And I need to know if I need to have certian packages installed to use DSL, becasue my cd-rom drive dosn't work, and I'm to lazy to go get it fixed...I hope you understand the question, and help woulr be great! Thanks..

    -MicroBurn
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  2. #2
    The Iceman Cometh
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    If you get a DSL router that has a built-in DHCP server, you can simply set up both boxes to accept an IP address from the server, and you're set. Once you have configured the router properly, both computers will be online, no software installation necessary on either box.

    AJ

  3. #3
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    Avdven, how do I set it to Accept IP address from the server?
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  4. #4
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    I believe that this should be of some value to you. I'm not well versed with Mandrake 8.x, but I believe that the principles and commands discussed should still apply.
    Regards.
    \"I believe that you can reach the point where there is no longer any difference between developing the habit of pretending to believe and developing the habit of believing.\"


  5. #5
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    You won't necessarily need a hub if there are only two machines. Unless you get a DSL router (like avdven says), you will only have two boxes and hence can connect them with a crossover cable, saving money and tangle.

    Some DSL routers may have a small (4-8 port) hub in them anyway - you might be able to get one of these.

    How does the DSL connect? Does it use a custom comms card, USB or ethernet? (I don't know much about DSL as we don't have it in my country, only ADSL)

  6. #6
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    It uses an Ethernet card to connect to the modem. Now, er0k just informed me on something that I should go about doing, does anyone have more advice, I'd like all I can get.
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  7. #7
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    hi

    microburn, how do you log in to dsl? is it static routing (e.g. the dsl router / modem has the necessary info for the address) or some sort of authentication (pppoe is probably the usual way for this) with a username and password on the workstations, or some other way?

    depending upon the dsl equipment, you may have to add more security to your boxes as dsl connections are highly sought after by crackers for their own malicious use.

    if you have a spare box you could probably set it up as a firewall/gateway for the linux and windows boxes.

    regards,
    mark.
    \'hi, welcome to *****. if you would like to speak to an operator, please hang up now.\'
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  8. #8
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    If you get something like a Linksys DSL Router as previously suggested, you would configure it to connect via PPPOE (PPP over Ethernet), and enter your DSL username and password that you have been assigned. The Router would act as a DHCP server and hand out IP addresses to all clients that are connected to it. I have one and it works great. One other thing that's great about it is that you won't really lose your connection and have to sign in manually all the time. The router does this for you. That was a pain before I got the router. Eventually, your connection times out, and you have to manually sign in again. I think this is only with DSL, however. Cable users don't have to do it, I believe. Ok, enough ranting. You may have also been given the suggestion to configure PPPOE on your Linux box or setup Internet Connection Sharing on your Windows box if it's available. I ended up not going with this since the router seemed to be a better solution. Now, my dual-boot RH 8/XP machine connects fine on both OSs. Let me know if I can be of any further assistance. I would be happy to help.


    t2k2
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  9. #9
    Kwiep
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    If you have a router/switch with a dhcp server you computer will automaticly get a valid ip when booting. First your linux box was connected to the dsl modem right ? so you already set it up to get an ip from a dhcp server. You just have to put the right cables in the right hole, straight tru cables btw , and reboot the machines. That'll work in your case.
    It works the same as if you didn't have the router. If your router has a dhcp server it probably also ahs something like a firewall and a NAT server... Well for your server you should only send incomming connections on port 80 to your servers internall ip (something like 192.168.1.10) and maybe set up the firewall (rtfm ) and that it...
    Double Dutch

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    Why would he need to allow inbound port 80? Are you setting up a Webserver MicorBurn? I must have missed that part. In this case, I believe you would need to setup port forwarding for port 80 if you are going to run a webserver just as neel suggested.

    t2k2
    Opinions are like holes - everybody\'s got\'em.

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