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Thread: Test your sysadmin knowledge

  1. #11
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    #14 is very vague and it really depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you just wanted to failover the two T-1's you could just use floating static routes. However, if you wanted to load share based on interface metrics across both T-1's you would use BGP. There really are 2 right answers.

    Also, I find it kind of funny that an ISP would have 2 T-1's to the Internet, and then have 4 clients with T-1's coming into their network. Anybody that knows anything about networking knows that this is a recipe for disaster because you have a potential for about 6Mbps of traffic coming in from your clients, but are only able to provide them with a maximum of approx 3Mbps of throughput to the Internet.

  2. #12
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    Official Answers

    I just wrote the professor who gave the original test and got his answers. Looks like I only missed one. Here are his notes on each question, though:

    1) The goal is the partition use. DF is the only program that will tell you about the
    partition: A

    2) You want to know it is running. So D and E are right out. A is good, it will work. B will not work, because SMTP is not the name of the daemon. Unless you have a newer program than when I gave this test.

    C might work if the directory was right. But /proc does not contain process names. I saw someone use /proc/running today. So you can get there thru proc now days.

    3) B: FSTAB has nothing to do with users.

    4) E : get the > and ; straight.

    5) E: it translates to 110 110 111 101

    6) Since telnet is already run from inetd/xinetd, you can just change the telnet service in /etc/services , so B

    7) B bridge becuase the IP space is the same space.

    8) D: *[^a]$ will catch both "vail" and "aspen" because neither has an "a" at the end.
    Note: his actual answer on this one was "At this time of night, all these look wrong.", but I know for a fact that D is the correct answer. If you doubt it, run a test yourself!

    9) D was the example that I show in class.

    10) C is the correct answer

    11) A: You want to do it in rc.local at boot time.

    12) C change the Apache config file

    13) D very big directory

    14) BGP A, because you have 2 routes out.

    15) 128 possible numbers -1 for the broadcast -1 for the network numbers
    gives you C 126

    So, in the end, roswell misses one, and I'd like to see his example for that one.
    /* You are not expected to understand this. */

  3. #13
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    roswell: this is a real nice test, but could you please give me the author's email, i want to contact him
    tia
    I don\'t wanna grow up change my skateboard for a tie

  4. #14
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by sk8
    roswell: this is a real nice test, but could you please give me the author's email, i want to contact him
    tia
    Actually, I'd rather not give out his address to protect his privacy. However, if you have any questions for him, I'd be happy to pass them along. If you don't want to post them here, just PM me.
    /* You are not expected to understand this. */

  5. #15
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    basically, i have a problem about Q 9
    i just cant get why we shouldnt use cgi-script. If the program prints the results in a readable form (call me XML) there's not a point not to use cgi. (the client is going to work on web-based gui)
    if you or the teacher can xplain this to me, i would greatly appreciate =)
    I don\'t wanna grow up change my skateboard for a tie

  6. #16
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    sk8 -- I missed number 9, too. Apparently he had emphasized it in class. Here's his answer:

    ----
    The question 9 was specific to the class in the sense that I was trying
    to elicit an understanding of what I had demonstrated in class.

    You can in about 5 minutes complete the task by just using inetd and
    host.allow/deny.... No fancy programing is needed to get a basic
    service up and going , if you have the example program working with
    the datamanipulation.

    Try making a /usr/games/fortune server for your friends. in 5 minutes you can give them
    fortunes over the net just by hooking fortune to the inetd.

    I have several tests in my archive. It is always good to get feedback
    on questions.
    ----

    His main point seemed to be that you don't have to write an extra script for something just to make it a service. Furthermore, in the question, he states that he only wanted specific IP's to have access to the data. That's where the hosts.allow and hosts.deny come into play. If you were to make a CGI that converts the data into a web page, you would then have to protect it with a password so that only people from those specific IP's had access. Creating a password for the resulting HTML was not part of answer E. I hope that answers your question.
    /* You are not expected to understand this. */

  7. #17
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    contrary to cgi, the customers will not commit to install a program, other they very simply can with their browser have access in the data
    (this of course requires one very well set up web-server with big attention in httpd.cong
    (thats just an idea not essentially the right answer)
    thanks =)
    ah, could he/or you exlain the why he should use a bridge instead of a router in question Number 7?
    generally tcp/ip internets (where internets = collection of networks) are based in routers not bridges, now that I am thinking about theres a second reason (imo) why we should use a router instead of a bridge, a bridge links networks in link layers (that is to say in ethernet that they have as we say) while a router links networks in their network layer (it does not need ethernet and more generally hardware in order to link 2 networks)

    thank you so much! (=

    and by the way, tell him to give you some more tests so we can have something to do =)
    I don\'t wanna grow up change my skateboard for a tie

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