Definition Of A H4c|{3r
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  1. #1
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    Definition Of A H4c|{3r

    Im wonder if you all can answer me a question which I have always been curious about....
    In your own words.....Define ......Hacker

    Ty He||sFurY

  2. #2
    Senior Member tampabay420's Avatar
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    I'm sure this question has been posted a bazillion times ;-)

    hack·er2 ( P ) Pronunciation Key (hkr)
    n.
    See hackie.

    Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
    Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
    [Buy it]

    hack·er1 ( P ) Pronunciation Key (hkr)
    n. Informal
    One who is proficient at using or programming a computer; a computer buff.
    One who uses programming skills to gain illegal access to a computer network or file.
    One who enthusiastically pursues a game or sport: a weekend tennis hacker.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [Perhaps from hacker, amateurish or inept golfer or tennis player (possibly from hack1), or perhaps from hack, practical joke, clever scheme (from dialectal hack, to embarrass, confuse, play a trick on).]

    Source: The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
    Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
    Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
    [Buy it]


    hacker

    \Hack"er\, n. One who, or that which, hacks. Specifically: A cutting instrument for making notches; esp., one used for notching pine trees in collecting turpentine; a hack.


    Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, © 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.


    hacker

    n 1: someone who plays golf poorly 2: a programmer for whom computing is its own reward; may enjoy the challenge of breaking into other computers 3: one who works hard at boring tasks [syn: hack, drudge]


    Source: WordNet ® 1.6, © 1997 Princeton University


    hacker



    <person, jargon> (Originally, someone who makes furniture with
    an axe) 1. A person who enjoys exploring the details of
    programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities, as
    opposed to most users, who prefer to learn only the minimum
    necessary.


    2. One who programs enthusiastically (even obsessively) or who
    enjoys programming rather than just theorizing about
    programming.

    3. A person capable of appreciating hack value.

    4. A person who is good at programming quickly.

    5. An expert at a particular program, or one who frequently
    does work using it or on it; as in "a Unix hacker".
    (Definitions 1 through 5 are correlated, and people who fit
    them congregate.)

    6. An expert or enthusiast of any kind. One might be an
    astronomy hacker, for example.

    7. One who enjoys the intellectual challenge of creatively
    overcoming or circumventing limitations.

    8. (Deprecated) A malicious meddler who tries to discover
    sensitive information by poking around. Hence "password
    hacker", "network hacker". The correct term is cracker.

    The term "hacker" also tends to connote membership in the
    global community defined by the net (see The Network and
    Internet address). It also implies that the person
    described is seen to subscribe to some version of the hacker
    ethic.

    It is better to be described as a hacker by others than to
    describe oneself that way. Hackers consider themselves
    something of an elite (a meritocracy based on ability), though
    one to which new members are gladly welcome. Thus while it is
    gratifying to be called a hacker, false claimants to the title
    are quickly labelled as "bogus" or a "wannabee".

    9. (University of Maryland, rare) A programmer who does not
    understand proper programming techniques and principles and
    doesn't have a Computer Science degree. Someone who just
    bangs on the keyboard until something happens. For example,
    "This program is nothing but spaghetti code. It must have
    been written by a hacker".

    [Jargon File]

    (1996-08-26)



    Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © 1993-2001 Denis Howe


    hacker

    n. [originally, someone who makes furniture with an
    axe] 1. A person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable
    systems and how to stretch their capabilities, as opposed to most
    users, who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary. 2. One who
    programs enthusiastically (even obsessively) or who enjoys
    programming rather than just theorizing about programming. 3. A
    person capable of appreciating hack value. 4. A person who is
    good at programming quickly. 5. An expert at a particular program,
    or one who frequently does work using it or on it; as in `a Unix
    hacker'. (Definitions 1 through 5 are correlated, and people who
    fit them congregate.) 6. An expert or enthusiast of any kind. One
    might be an astronomy hacker, for example. 7. One who enjoys the
    intellectual challenge of creatively overcoming or circumventing
    limitations. 8. [deprecated] A malicious meddler who tries to
    discover sensitive information by poking around. Hence `password
    hacker', `network hacker'. The correct term for this sense is
    cracker.

    The term `hacker' also tends to connote membership in the global
    community defined by the net (see the network and Internet
    address). For discussion of some of the basics of this culture,
    see the How To Become A Hacker
    (http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html) FAQ. It also
    implies that the person described is seen to subscribe to some
    version of the hacker ethic (see hacker ethic).

    It is better to be described as a hacker by others than to describe
    oneself that way. Hackers consider themselves something of an
    elite (a meritocracy based on ability), though one to which new
    members are gladly welcome. There is thus a certain ego
    satisfaction to be had in identifying yourself as a hacker (but if
    you claim to be one and are not, you'll quickly be labeled bogus).
    See also wannabee.

    This term seems to have been first adopted as a badge in the 1960s
    by the hacker culture surrounding TMRC and the MIT AI Lab. We have
    a report that it was used in a sense close to this entry's by teenage
    radio hams and electronics tinkerers in the mid-1950s.



    Source: Jargon File 4.2.0
    yeah, I\'m gonna need that by friday...

  3. #3
    AO Ancient: Team Leader
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    Well...... That about covered it Tampa......
    Don\'t SYN us.... We\'ll SYN you.....
    \"A nation that draws too broad a difference between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools.\" - Thucydides

  4. #4
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    8-] that covered everything concering that word.

    but words can't label me.

  5. #5
    AO Ancient: Team Leader
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    How about a large sheet of construction paper and a power stapler??????
    Don\'t SYN us.... We\'ll SYN you.....
    \"A nation that draws too broad a difference between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards, and its fighting done by fools.\" - Thucydides

  6. #6
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    Re: Definition Of A H4c|{3r

    Originally posted here by He||sFurY
    In your own words
    Tampa! You didn't listen to the question! Tsk, tsk.... 8Ţ

    SSJVegeta-Sei


    Pierce me with steel, rend me with claw and fang; as I die, a legend is born for another generation to follow.
    An\' it harm none, do as ye will. - Wiccan Rede

  7. #7
    Hacker: any of the above definitions

    Also see: Whitehat

    Whitehat: one who "hacks" for non-malicious purposes; antonym: Blackhat

    Blackhat: One who "hacks" in order to retrieve information for malicious purpose or to deface; synonym: Cracker

    Also See: Script Kiddie

    Script Kiddie: One who is annoying to Whitehats and tries to be mailicious by using annoying progz. and thinks he/she is 1337
    If at first you don\'t succeed, try again. Then give up. There is no sense in being ridiculous about things!

  8. #8
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    I think that definition was superb. I get tired of the media referring to crackers and script kiddies as hackers. The true 1337 want knowledge, problems to solve. In the meritocracy, power is easily obtainable through information, and true hackers hold it responsibly in their own hands. Hacking is not just a hobby, or a title...it is truly a philosophy.
    \"I disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.\" - Voltairé


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