UNIX permissions problem
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Thread: UNIX permissions problem

  1. #1
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    UNIX permissions problem

    I just had a strange thing happen....

    Last night I chmodded /usr/home such that users could not step back a level and read other users files (a-r). However, When I did this it broke ls so it seemed that only root had permission to use it. Once i set the permissions back the way they were before the problem went away. Why did it do that?

    TIA

  2. #2
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    totally off the top of my head. and i'm in win now, so i can't check.

    is ls in /usr/bin ?
    Hmm...theres something a little peculiar here. Oh i see what it is! the sentence is talking about itself! do you see that? what do you mean? sentences can\'t talk! No, but they REFER to things, and this one refers directly-unambigeously-unmistakably-to the very sentence which it is!

  3. #3
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    a-r???


    What did you use for the settings? I was looking through the man page and don't see any chmod settings like that. Unless you mean a=all and -r means remove read. Root always has overriding powers over any account. So if you removed it, then it would apply to the user that owned the directory, the group that owned the directory and everyone else.

    Ah.. and remember... to do an ls in a directory (that is to "read the contents of the directory") you need read.
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted here by MsMittens
    a-r???


    What did you use for the settings? I was looking through the man page and don't see any chmod settings like that. Unless you mean a=all and -r means remove read. Root always has overriding powers over any account. So if you removed it, then it would apply to the user that owned the directory, the group that owned the directory and everyone else.

    Ah.. and remember... to do an ls in a directory (that is to "read the contents of the directory") you need read.
    a does indeed = all. Will it work if I remove the execute premission instead

  5. #5
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Hrmm. Lemme think here. *ouch*. That hurt.

    Ok.

    Read let's you see inside the directory (get a listing)
    Execute allows you to enter the directory (cd)
    Write allows to delete/add items to a directory (cp or mv or rm, etc)

    So. To prevent the users from going seeing each others directories one of two things:

    chmod uo-rxw on the main parent directory (assuming they default start in their home directory).

    OR

    use chroot to make it a "jailed" environment.
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
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  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by MsMittens
    Hrmm. Lemme think here. *ouch*. That hurt.

    Ok.

    Read let's you see inside the directory (get a listing)
    Execute allows you to enter the directory (cd)
    Write allows to delete/add items to a directory (cp or mv or rm, etc)

    So. To prevent the users from going seeing each others directories one of two things:

    chmod uo-rxw on the main parent directory (assuming they default start in their home directory).

    OR

    use chroot to make it a "jailed" environment.
    did it....now let's see if it works

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