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  1. #1
    Antionline's Security Dude instronics's Avatar
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    mircX downloads

    Hello everyone.

    A friend (a newbie to irc and very fond of irc bots) was asking me about where to get irc bots for windows. Me, being a good boy went up to google and found mirx.com and started browsing that site whilst fighting a fierce battle with their #$&^& popups. After arising victorious from them #^$&#$ popups, i started reading their disclaimer about downloading their scripts, bots, addons, etc... and after finally reading about a few simple bots, i proceeded with downloading. My AV went bollocks, every file they offer for download is infected with all kinds of backdoor virii. So, to anyone who is into irc bots, scripts, etc.....keep away from www.mircx.com. Make sure that you have an uptodate AV. I cannot stress it enough to have and update AV software.

    Cheers.
    Ubuntu-: Means in African : "Im too dumb to use Slackware"

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    does your friend have any urge to start programming? If so you might suggest they start to write their own, either a socket bot in mirc or i have personally toyed with irc bots written in perl. They are rather simple to write and very rewarding once you get them working. If your friend is interested I could cobble together a very simple bot for him/her to start from. It's actually a very easy way to learn an awful lot about programming. Hell, i had been experimenting with multithreaded perl bots when i quit visiting irc..

    Hell, if anyone else is interested I could write up a very basic bot "shell".... basically a bot that reads a ini file and joins the server specified, then registers and then joins a room. And stub the area with an example as to how to get this bot to respond to commands. It'll take me a day or two to get the time to do it but i'd enjoy the exercise.

  3. #3
    Antionline's Security Dude instronics's Avatar
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    Well g00n, like i said, hes very new to irc in general. I got a small bot for him to play with till he understands the basics of what a bot is supposed to do and what not. Im scripting one for him as we speak for mirc, just so hes got his own unique personal bot. After he gets a little fammiliar with the whole bot thing, i want to convince him to setup an eggdrop. Hes got a *nix box aswell, so the eggdrop would be fine for him.

    Cheers for your offer
    Ubuntu-: Means in African : "Im too dumb to use Slackware"

  4. #4
    Senior Member tampabay420's Avatar
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    there are a few Perl modules for IRC bots... it makes coding them very easy...

    http://search.cpan.org/author/JEEK/Net-IRC-0.73/IRC.pm
    DESCRIPTION

    Welcome to Net::IRC, a work in progress. First intended to be a quick tool for writing an IRC script in Perl, Net::IRC has grown into a comprehensive Perl implementation of the IRC protocol (RFC 1459), developed by several members of the EFnet IRC channel #perl, and maintained in channel #net-irc.

    There are 4 component modules which make up Net::IRC:

    Net::IRC

    The wrapper for everything else, containing methods to generate Connection objects (see below) and a connection manager which does an event loop on all available filehandles. Sockets or files which are readable (or writable, or whatever you want it to select() for) get passed to user-supplied handler subroutines in other packages or in user code.

    Net::IRC::Connection

    The big time sink on this project. Each Connection instance is a single connection to an IRC server. The module itself contains methods for every single IRC command available to users (Net::IRC isn't designed for writing servers, for obvious reasons), methods to set, retrieve, and call handler functions which the user can set (more on this later), and too many cute comments. Hey, what can I say, we were bored.

    Net::IRC::Event

    Kind of a struct-like object for storing info about things that the IRC server tells you (server responses, channel talk, joins and parts, et cetera). It records who initiated the event, who it affects, the event type, and any other arguments provided for that event. Incidentally, the only argument passed to a handler function.

    Net::IRC:CC

    The analogous object to Connection.pm for connecting, sending and retrieving with the DCC protocol. Instances of DCC.pm are invoked from Connection->new_{send,get,chat} in the same way that IRC->newconn invokes Connection->new. This will make more sense later, we promise.

    The central concept that Net::IRC is built around is that of handlers (or hooks, or callbacks, or whatever the heck you feel like calling them). We tried to make it a completely event-driven model, a la Tk -- for every conceivable type of event that your client might see on IRC, you can give your program a custom subroutine to call. But wait, there's more! There are 3 levels of handler precedence:

    Default handlers

    Considering that they're hardwired into Net::IRC, these won't do much more than the bare minimum needed to keep the client listening on the server, with an option to print (nicely formatted, of course) what it hears to whatever filehandles you specify (STDOUT by default). These get called only when the user hasn't defined any of his own handlers for this event.

    User-definable global handlers

    The user can set up his own subroutines to replace the default actions for every IRC connection managed by your program. These only get invoked if the user hasn't set up a per-connection handler for the same event.

    User-definable per-connection handlers

    Simple: this tells a single connection what to do if it gets an event of this type. Supersedes global handlers if any are defined for this event.

    And even better, you can choose to call your custom handlers before or after the default handlers instead of replacing them, if you wish. In short, it's not perfect, but it's about as good as you can get and still be documentable, given the sometimes horrendous complexity of the IRC protocol.
    i can post some example scripts if you'd like- of course you can always google it yourself
    http://www.irchelp.org/
    yeah, I\'m gonna need that by friday...

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