Really need help with this
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Thread: Really need help with this

  1. #1
    The Recidivist
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    Nov 2002
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    Unhappy Really need help with this

    I have been trying for several days to install RedHat on my computer with no avail. Heres the problem. I have one harddrive in which there is only one partition which Windows ME is installed on it. I can reformat and start over. I need to be able to partition it and still keep windows on there. I know this can be done but I can't afford to register Partition Magic because I am broke and I can't seem to find anything else because I don't really know what I am looking for or where to look for it. Also I can't afford to go out and spend $50 on a book with RedHat but also don't know which file to download from there site. I really want to put this as a duel boot but am running into so many problems that I am ready to give up. Could anyone please offer me some? I would be really appreciative.

    thnks,
    hjack
    "Where the tree of knowledge stands, there is always paradise": thus speak the oldest and the youngest serpents.
    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    these may help...

    first. an excellent dual-boot instruction that i downloaded from somewhere. unfortunately, i don't remember where to give them credit. could have been from someone here! if it's yours, feel free to take the credit!!! that way I can document that as well....

    it's short, so i will just paste it here.

    How to dual-boot Windows NT/2000/XP and Linux using NTLDR
    This tutorial is based on using LILO (linux loader) as your boot loader. It assumes you already have NT/2000/XP install and booting.

    At the time of this writing, I was booting Linux, WindowsNT, and DOS 6.22 at home, and Linux, WindowsNT, and DR-OpenDOS 7.02 at work. It was pretty annoying, to me at least, to have the LILO prompt come up, type 'dos', and THEN have to select an option from the NTLDR menu which would pop up afterwards. I liked the menu presentation that NT gave at the time, so I chose to use NTLDR to boot them all from one selection. The only apparent disadvantage to this setup is that you need to update the linux boot image in the NTLDR when you install a new kernel. However, I don't imagine most average users switch kernels all that often, and those of you that do won't mind doing this, or already have a better solution in mind/in place.

    That said, if you need/want this, read on. If not, skip it.

    The first step in the process is to remove the current installation of LILO from the Master Boot Record (MBR), if you're already using it. If not, ignore this part. To accomplish this, type 'lilo -u <boot device>'. On my machine, this was /dev/hda, which corresponds to the MBR of the first detected hard drive. If all goes well, LILO will be uninstalled. DO NOT REBOOT at this point, your system will be inaccessible without a boot disk or CD.

    The next step is to edit your LILO configuration file. It's usually /etc/lilo.conf. If lilo was installed in the MBR, the lilo.conf will reflect this. There are a couple changes to be made. Here is an example lilo.conf file:

    boot=/dev/hda
    map=/boot/map
    install=/boot/boot.b
    prompt
    timeout=50
    image=/vmlinuz.2.0.33
    label=linux
    root=/dev/hdb1
    other=/dev/hda1
    label=windowsnt

    This lilo.conf file is configured so that the boot device is /dev/hda. Tha's the MBR on the first detected hard drive. So we want to change that to be the linux root partition, which NTLDR will load up for us, instead of LILO loading the NTLDR. In my case, this is /dev/hdb1, the first partition of the second hard drive. Next, since NTLDR will be handling the booting, LILO doesn't need to know anything about the WindowsNT or DOS installs, nor how to boot them, so take out or comment out the prompt, timeout and other sections. It should now look like this:

    boot=/dev/hdb1
    map=/boot/map
    install=/boot/boot.b
    #prompt
    #timeout=50
    image=/vmlinuz.2.0.33
    label=linux
    root=/dev/hdb1
    read-only
    #other=/dev/hda1
    # label=windowsnt

    By commenting out prompt, we tell LILO not to ask which selection to boot, it just picks the first one it sees, which is our linux kernel. The timeout option is only needed in conjunction with prompt, so that goes, too. The other section is what LILO normally would use to pass us off to the NTLDR, and now it won't bother.

    The next thing to do is install LILO. This time, we want it on our linux root partition, instead of in the MBR. Since we've edited lilo.conf to specify the correct location already, all that's necessary is to run lilo. It may complain that lilo isn't being installed on the first drive, but since there will be a boot loader there (NTLDR), that's ok, and we can safely ignore the warning. Once this is done, keep reading, linux isn't quite bootable yet.

    LILO is now installed on our linux root partition, but there's still nothing pointing it to linux. To get around this, we create a boot sector image file or sorts for the NTLDR to look at to boot linux. The way we do this is to use the dd program (copy/convert utility). The syntax we're looking for is: 'dd if=<root partition> of=<boot pointer file> bs=512 count=1'. This is a little more complicated than the bootdisk dd usage. <root partition> is of course your linux root partition, /dev/hdb1 in this case. <boot pointer file> is a file that will contain the boot sector image that NTLDR uses to boot linux. It's a physical copy of the first 512 bytes of the linux root partition, where LILO is now installed. Making sense now? bs=512 sets the block size to 512 bytes, and count=1 ensures that we only get one block in the image. I used: 'dd if=/dev/hdb1 of=bootsect.lnx bs=512 count=1'. You should now have a file called bootsect.lnx (which, if you're using WindowsNT and DOS, needs to be in DOS 8.3 filename format, which bootsect.lnx fits in.

    The bootsect.lnx file is basically your linux boot sector. It will go on the NT/2000/XP partition, and be loaded by NTLDR. To add this to your NTLDR menu, you only need to edit the boot.ini file located in your Windows root directory (usually c:\.) Here's a sample boot.ini:

    [boot loader]
    timeout=10
    default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT
    [operating systems]
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00"
    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00 [VGA mode]" /basevideo /sos
    C:\="MS-DOS"

    To add the bootsect.lnx file we created to the NTLDR configuration file, simply add a line that looks like this, reflecting your own decription:

    C:\bootsect.lnx="Red Hat Linux Release 4.2 (Biltmore)"

    Once you've edited the boot.ini and saved it, you should be good to go. When you reboot the machine, the NTLDR menu has a new option at the bottom, "Red Hat Linux Release 4.2 (Biltmore)" in this case. Select it, hit enter, and linux boots.

    If you want linux to be your default cjoice, just change the default line to: default=C:\bootsect.lnx.

    2nd, attached is an IBM whitepaper on Linux for newbies. This describes the process the author went through to investigate Linux functionality and some of the programs that were available to perform typical duties.


    Good luck, hjack.
    just like water off a duck\'s back... I AM HERE.

    for CMOS help, check out my CMOS tut?

  3. #3
    Antionline Herpetologist
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    1,165
    Since he has Windows ME, it's no good for him, but nice resource anyway. As far as hjack is concerned, you should get the 3 ISOs (.iso files) from the RedHat ftp that say RedHat-8.0-Disc1.iso (Disc2 and Disc3 too) or something similar. Get the ISOs with the latest number (ie 8.1 is better than 8.0). Also, you'll need a CD burner and blank CD's to use these, otherwise, just go out and buy a book. Oh yeah, and if you have dial-up, just forget it because you're going to have to spend months downloading these files (each one is around 700 megs).
    Cheers,
    cgkanchi
    Buy the Snakes of India book, support research and education (sorry the website has been discontinued)
    My blog: http://biology000.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Banned
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    If you're willing to reformat and start over, here's a little how-to.

    First, boot from the WIN ME-cd. It should give you an option to either boot from harddisk, from CD-ROM, or start the setup. Choose to boot from CD-ROM, then select the option that gives you a command-line with CD-support.
    You should find yourself at a command-line now. Next, go to your CD-ROM drive (usually D: or E:, so just type D: or E:), and CD to the Win9x-directory (CD win9x).
    Then start Fdisk by typing fdisk. The easiest solution would be to remove all partitions, and start all over again. Then partition your harddisk for Windows with leaving at least 1 GIG (preferrably more if you're going for RH 8.0) for Linux. (Say you have a 20GIG HDD, then make Windows-partitions up to 18GB - I assume you know the drill; leave the rest unpartitioned).
    Exit fdisk, and reboot. Now choose the 'Setup'-option and install Windows.

    After you've installed Windows, pop in the first RH-CD, reboot from CD-ROM and follow the instructions... If you need more detailed instructions, post away...

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    The Recidivist
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    Nov 2002
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    Negative, there is to much on my computer for me to backup and start over. That is like my biggest problem. I need to find a way for me to do this without reformat and starting a fresh. I can't really afford to buy a new hardrive because money is really tight ( being a college student sucks!!). Any ideas? I'd really appreciate your help.


    hjack
    "Where the tree of knowledge stands, there is always paradise": thus speak the oldest and the youngest serpents.
    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  6. #6
    Banned
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    I overlooked something... since you're using WinME which is FAT32, you can have RH resize that partition... Basically, RH will detect that your HD is totally reserved for Windows and suggest you to either remove Windows, OR resize the Windows partition. Choosing this second option should be what you need...

  7. #7
    The Recidivist
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    Negative, so I am going to try that but here is another question. These .iso files, there is 6 in all. Do I burn each one to there own cd? How do I boot to them? I know these are like really newbie questions but I wanna make sure I do this right and not mess this is up.


    hjack
    "Where the tree of knowledge stands, there is always paradise": thus speak the oldest and the youngest serpents.
    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  8. #8
    Banned
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    Each iso is about 700MB, so yes you'll have to burn them each one to their own cd...
    Just burn them with your burner-software, reboot your box and set your BIOS to boot from cd-rom...
    I'm not sure, but I think the first 3 iso's are MORE than enough...

  9. #9
    Banned
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    Feb 2003
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    Help

    I am a newbie just like you and I also just installed linux (mandrake). But I mean Linux is Linux. I installed mine by just burning it all on cd's. What you do is burn it to cd and then after you do that just shut off your computer and when you reboot it put the cd in and it will automatically start up with a redhat installer and it will ask you if you want to resize your partition. Take off 2-4 gigabytes for Redhat then hit the auto-allocate button and it will put a linux and swap partition on there automatically. Then finish up the installation. Easy as that! Hope this helps you because I went through the same exact stuff your going through. If you need a place to download mandrake click here. Its a big download.

  10. #10
    Dead Man Walking
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    810
    one thing i dont think naybody else mentioned is that you definatley need to run a windows defrag before you even begin to mess with the partititon. I know that seems kinda common sense but you never know. Its usualy the simple things that screw up even the best of the best

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