win2k file system to unix file system
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Thread: win2k file system to unix file system

  1. #1
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    win2k file system to unix file system

    Pretty much out of boredom, I'm in the process of making my Windows 2000 Server file structure to look like a Unix file structrure

    Rather than have:
    c:\documents and settings
    c:\program files
    c:\%systemroot%

    I want to look like so:
    /etc
    /root
    /home
    /usr
    /var

    etc. etc.

    What kind of securty issues or any other issues will I run into doing this?
    Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. - Theodore Roosevelt

  2. #2
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    ...Windows most likely wouldn't run. That is, if you simply went over each folder and renamed them. Or they'd automatically change themselves to the proper folder/filenames and you'd be back to where you started again.

    What you should do, is either create a seperate partition (maybe an L: ), and set up your tree there.

    ...or you could simply get cygwin, which, imo, is a helluva lot more convenient.
    ...This Space For Rent.

    -[WebCarnage]

  3. #3
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    You can't really do it very conveniently. I mean, you can rename "Documents And Settings" to "home", but that's about all.

    Windows expects nearly all of its files to sit within the monolithic "windows" directory, or system32, there is not way afaik to separate them out into bin, lib, sbin etc

  4. #4
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    You are correct. If you rename Windows "working" directories you will have nothing but trouble. Best advice - don't do it.

    cygwin, like mentioned, would be a great option for you or even VMWare or another emulation program. I'm not a big fan of having dual boot systems for a number of reasons but that's just my preference. Others here partition out their drives so that *nix and Windows can co-exist.

    Just for fun, if you were able to rename these directories, you'd have to set ACLs on them to mirror that of Linux. Then you'd have to populate them with the proper executibles and other filez, which you'd have to improvise on because as you know, *nix has features that Windows does not and vice versa. You can see how quickly this could become messy for you.

    My two cents...
    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  5. #5
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    I've got Program Files & half of Document & Settings moved manually.
    I pretty much cut and paste and then edited the registry to the reflect the changes.
    The one problem I ran into was the Windows File Protection.
    Everytime I would move something or delete it would move it back to default setings.
    I finally got that turned off, I think.
    I'm not going to real deep in detaul to /bin /sbin etc.etc ; atleast I'm not right now.
    I just want to get it working.
    I'm afraid to reboot now, I've got half of Documents and Settings moved and edited.

    Thanks for the advice on cygwin, but I didn't like it last time I tried it.
    I just installed vmware recently and have to say alot better than cygwin.

    feh
    Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. - Theodore Roosevelt

  6. #6
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    Any one know some tool to know the directory structure of remote server? Not for hacking, just to tutorial

  7. #7
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Yeah, Windows Protection Errors should happen when attempting what you have done. If I had to guess the *exact* cause I would say that it would be one of these:

    ============================
    A real-mode driver and a protected-mode driver are in conflict.
    The registry is damaged.
    A protected-mode driver is loaded from the System.ini file and the driver is already initialized.
    There is a physical input/output (I/O) address conflict or a random access memory (RAM) address conflict. You may also want to look into some threads her on "rebasing". It may shed additional light on the issue.

    Again, this project sounds like fun but will ultimately only be useful as a learning exercise.

    Our scars have the power to remind us that our past was real. -- Hannibal Lecter.
    Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful. -- John Wooden

  8. #8
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    Yeah, Microsoft makes it rather difficult to change "their" work.
    I found a few ways to get around it and make it work.
    I started to notice performance issuses and other misc. problems.
    I eventually scrapped it and started over.
    I think it would be more successful on NT or 2000 prior to SP3.


    Of course it's all for fun.
    That's the only thing I use my Windows machines for.
    Install it, break it, fix it and start over.
    Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. - Theodore Roosevelt

  9. #9

    Unhappy Unpractical.

    I personally wouldn't bother. Sure, it would be neat; but not practical. Some applications, upon install wouldn't beable to work properly, simply because they're not pointing to the right place. I'm not sure how you would go about changing %systemroot% though

    I believe its more trouble than its worth.

  10. #10
    Any one know some tool to know the directory structure of remote server? Not for hacking, just to tutorial
    ...and this has to do with this thread how?

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