Question?
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  1. #1
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    Question?

    what does this means?why in the beginning it starts to ping 10.0.0.2?i also encounter some problem connecting some web site..
    BlAcKiE
    GearBlitz

  2. #2
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    ehh... perhaps you have a 10.0.0.0 home network using NAT and 203.125.85.37 is your external IP address and it's routing packets to host 2 on your network?
    i will shoot you so hard.

  3. #3
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    Gonna guess here based on the fact that 10.x.x.x is private addressing, but it looks like your ISP has a private addressing scheme. It's likely they have caching servers or some such that act in between you and your destinations. I get that here (my ISP has a similar addressing scheme). Perhaps they have blocked that site?

    <edit>

    Or as spyrul suggested, could be your own internal IP Addressing. Do you have a router that acts as a firewall or gives out IP addresses for your internal network?

    </edit>
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted here by spyrul
    ehh... perhaps you have a 10.0.0.0 home network using NAT and 203.125.85.37 is your external IP address and it's routing packets to host 2 on your network?
    i am using adsl and onli one computer is connected to the ethernet modem.i installed norton internet security to act as a firewall to the windows 98 se machine.
    BlAcKiE
    GearBlitz

  5. #5
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    maybe you could do start>run>"cmd">"ipconfig" and tell us what it says your IP is. if it's 10.0.0.2, then your ISP is just assigning you an IP in the 10.0.0.0 network like MsMittens suggested, and 203.125.85.37 is one of your ISP's public IP addresses.

    i'll go out on a limb, though, and assume that an ISP would not assign 10.0.0.2 to a public user, so maybe that's their DNS or gateway or something...

    i'll look over it a bit more and see if i can remember what most of that means... haven't touched that program in a while.

    [edit]
    while looking over it, 10.0.0.2 looks like a DNS server (resolving www.hotmail.com in numbers 9 and 10), and maybe also a DHCP (note the DHCP request and ACK on numbers 15 and 16) server... it's (literally ) asking where 203.125.85.37 is, then the reply is a MAC address (numbers 17 and 18)

    that's all i'm going to try to figure for now. i'm tired
    [/edit]
    i will shoot you so hard.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by spyrul
    maybe you could do start>run>"cmd">"ipconfig" and tell us what it says your IP is. if it's 10.0.0.2, then your ISP is just assigning you an IP in the 10.0.0.0 network like MsMittens suggested, and 203.125.85.37 is one of your ISP's public IP addresses.

    i'll go out on a limb, though, and assume that an ISP would not assign 10.0.0.2 to a public user, so maybe that's their DNS or gateway or something...

    i'll look over it a bit more and see if i can remember what most of that means... haven't touched that program in a while.

    [edit]
    while looking over it, 10.0.0.2 looks like a DNS server (resolving www.hotmail.com in numbers 9 and 10), and maybe also a DHCP (note the DHCP request and ACK on numbers 15 and 16) server... it's (literally ) asking where 203.125.85.37 is, then the reply is a MAC address (numbers 17 and 18)

    that's all i'm going to try to figure for now. i'm tired
    [/edit]
    thanks for ur efford..my IP is 203.125.x.x. that is y i am also wondering y my modem keep sending that...and there is a global thing...i also cant figure out what is it..
    BlAcKiE
    GearBlitz

  7. #7
    Just a Virtualized Geek MrLinus's Avatar
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    It's not his IP that's being assigned but rather a series of internal caching machines between him and the rest of the internet. A DMZ zone if you will.
    Goodbye, Mittens (1992-2008). My pillow will be cold without your purring beside my head
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  8. #8
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    Originally posted here by MsMittens
    It's not his IP that's being assigned but rather a series of internal caching machines between him and the rest of the internet. A DMZ zone if you will.
    This is an old ISP trick, One of my former employers use to do it for our ISDN customers, basically if they all used their bandwidth at once we would be screwed (only had one T1 out and 200 ISDN's) so we would run a bunch of caching servers to save our outgoing bandwidth, this let us oversell our connection. Sure its a little underhanded but its the only way to keep your prices competitive.
    Penguin I am pretty sure that this is what is happening in your case as the 10 addresses are non-routable and would not make it past your ISP.

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