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Thread: Hacking, Hacker > Cracker

  1. #1
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    Post Hacking, Hacker > Cracker

    <Quote>
    There is a community, a shared culture, of expert programmers and networking wizards that traces its history back through decades to the first time-sharing minicomputers and the earliest ARPAnet experiments. The members of this culture originated the term `hacker'. Hackers built the Internet. Hackers made the Unix operating system what it is today. Hackers run Usenet. Hackers make the World Wide Web work. If you are part of this culture, if you have contributed to it and other people in it know who you are and call you a hacker, you're a hacker.

    The hacker mind-set is not confined to this software-hacker culture. There are people who apply the hacker attitude to other things, like electronics or music -- actually, you can find it at the highest levels of any science or art. Software hackers recognize these kindred spirits elsewhere and may call them "hackers" too -- and some claim that the hacker nature is really independent of the particular medium the hacker works in. But in the rest of this document we will focus on the skills and attitudes of software hackers, and the traditions of the shared culture that originated the term `hacker'.

    There is another group of people who loudly call themselves hackers, but aren't. These are people (mainly adolescent males) who get a kick out of breaking into computers and phreaking the phone system. Real hackers call these people `crackers' and want nothing to do with them. Real hackers mostly think crackers are lazy, irresponsible, and not very bright, and object that being able to break security doesn't make you a hacker any more than being able to hotwire cars makes you an automotive engineer. Unfortunately, many journalists and writers have been fooled into using the word `hacker' to describe crackers; this irritates real hackers no end.

    The basic difference is this: hackers build things, crackers break them.

    <quote>

    If you want to be a hacker, live learn and prosper along side some of the best security minded people I have ever had the pleasure to chat with.

    If you want to be a cracker, go read the alt.2600 newsgroup and get ready to do five to ten in the slammer after finding out you aren't as smart as you think you are.


    In short if you want to be maliciuos this site is not for you !!!.

  2. #2
    Dead Man Walking
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    One thing ive noticed though mark is not matter how many of theese posts people put up we still end up with thread after thread "how do i use sub7" or "how can i get my girlfreinds password" and they all get the same response. one question though.....where is the quote from and is there more to the article. If so could you please post a link i would like to read the rest if there is any more to it.

  3. #3
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    The Post is from bbs text

    I have copied it onto my website for you zombieman.

    http://itdepartment.0catch.com

    note: this is on some ropey free host who includes popups in the free price.
    if you minimise the first popup you usually don't get to many more.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Senior Member gore's Avatar
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    i remember reading this, its in a few books i have, Hacker attack has that paragraph in it.

  5. #5
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    ARGGH
    Further washing of the Term Hacker

    Talk to an old school AD/C++ programmer (some one who was programming from the 70's or 80's) about hackers and you will get a very negative response.

    There was a time when hacker=bad programmer/some one who broke into computers
    Phreaker= some one who stole phone calls
    Cracker= some one who broke the copy protection on software

    Some time around the mid 90's a bunch of usnet geeks decided to redefine hacker (note they where mostly made up of bad programmers) and so we now have this false mythology.


    this pet peeve ranks slightly below the damm obfuscated code morons.
    Who is more trustworthy then all of the gurus or Buddha’s?

  6. #6
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    Wink I Like it.

    BBalad, think of what was said in the lotus smartsuite forum yesterday and see if you can guess what I hoped to achieve by this.

    If you read the full Essay on my website it is actually pretty neat and I would be proud to call myself a hacker if its terminology wasn't associated with wrong doing.

    Anyway. I think thats how we should play it

    Hacker = Good, Computer Enthusiast
    Cracker = bad
    Script Kiddie = bad

  7. #7
    Dead Man Walking
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    Mark very ineresting reading especialy for a newbie like me. Thanks for the post. your website has earned a spot in my bookmarks. I am curently working on my own website [hopefully not sludge ] and would like to put a link to your page on mine if thats okay with you.

  8. #8
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    imho, hacking is the process of writing spaghetti code (i.e. no use of structured programming methodolgy)<homer>"mmmm...spaghetti...."</homer>. This can be a useful skill, akin to someone who can give a pretty good speech in front of a room full of people with no preparation. Point is, if the person HAD prepared, their speech would likely have been better than a person's speech who had less natural talent, but who had prepared. I guess that's why the syntactically forgiving perl is so popular with these folks.

    Some people need heros & legends.

  9. #9
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    Bahh...the term hacker was in use long before the internet was (at least the modern post arp/mil net internet...interestingly called the matrix until 93) and no hackers didn't create the arpnet that as created by professional programmers. this was all long before the movie Hackers.
    Until the last 10 years the term hacker has always had a negative connotation (meaning either bad programmer/person who broke into computers).

    On another note alt.2600 predates the internet and Usenet (at least the commercial post great renaming Usenet.) it was somewhere else and drop the alt. but still 2600.
    Who is more trustworthy then all of the gurus or Buddha’s?

  10. #10
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    hat

    A hacker is still either someone who quickly produces code, or is a skilled computer-security enthusiast. Someone should pick one! I think we should start a movement to get hacker redifined as the latter definition and have different hats for 'crackers'. black hats would be the ones who break into systems, remove copy-protection etc. Grey hat crackers would identify flaws by breaking in, telling those responsible for the system, and leaving it alone. And white hats would be securing systems. What do you all think about that?

    #!usr/bin/perl
    use "geek.pm";
    require "sanity";

    $cracker=Geek("hacker");
    $hacker=Geek("programmer");
    $kiddie=Geek("loox0r");

    $hacker!=$kiddie|die("Ahhh, the universe is spinning wildly out of control!");

    --infosecguru

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