Here go the numbskulls again....... - Page 4
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Thread: Here go the numbskulls again.......

  1. #31
    Doc d00dz Attackin's Avatar
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    I agree with Tedob1 great point of view on things .

    Cya
    First you listen, then you do, finally you teach.
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  2. #32
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    Tiger Shark,

    Your letter to the Senator is great!! I love it.


    ccKid

  3. #33
    Old Fart
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    Originally posted here by Tedob1

    those who know nothing of a subject shouldn't be make laws regarding it
    Amen brother, AMEN!
    Al
    It isn't paranoia when you KNOW they're out to get you...

  4. #34
    AO Security for Non-Geeks tonybradley's Avatar
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    those who know nothing of a subject shouldn't be make laws regarding it
    We wouldn't have any laws then. LOL

    Interesting follow-ups to the Hatch issue which I don't think have been mentioned here.

    1) his web site uses unlicensed software

    The senator's site makes extensive use of a JavaScript menu system developed by Milonic Solutions, a software company based in the United Kingdom. The copyright-protected code has not been licensed for use on Hatch's website.

    "It's an unlicensed copy," said Andy Woolley, who runs Milonic. "It's very unfortunate for him because of those comments he made."

    Full article
    2) his web site contained a link to a porn site

    It's no joke. If you go to Orrin Hatch's site and click on "my utah search"
    on the right, you'll end up at a porn site: http://www.senate.gov/~hatch/index.c...=Students.Utah
    The web site is down but you can see it cached here:

    http://web.archive.org/web/200210210...=Students.Utah

    Gotta check those glass walls before throwing stones Mr. Senator

  5. #35
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    Heh, even if it fails, they will create other laws, just to scare ppl into doing stuff that is "illegal" does that really stop anyone from doing them though? it stops some... But overall, I think it would hurt the government more to pass the laws, then to leave it the way it is. I have to agree with tonybradley, most of them don't even know anything about computers, it would be like us making laws on something we havne't ever seen. that's my oponion tho...

  6. #36
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    i'm convinced that this guy does not, and has not ever, owned a computer. standard US gov't policy towards something going wrong - BREAK SOMETHING.

    you know people would come up with a mod chip or something. people don't like having their crap broken into, much less broken period
    i\'m starting to think that i\'m bound to always be the first guy on the second page of the thread.

  7. #37
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    Judge, Jury and Executioner Huh? I wonder why he didn't take a poll before making those statements on the recoed. He'll be backpeddling and no one will here of it and then it will be re-introduced as a rider on a bill to provide farming subsidies to dairy farmers in SD because of the El Nino effect.
    \"If you take a starving dog in off the street and make him prosperous he will not bite you, this is the principle difference between a dog and a man\" - Mark Twain

  8. #38
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    The music industry should die!

    That wouldn’t be the death of music. Rather it would be the release of the creative spirit. No more canned fads pushed down the throats of impressionable kids or bands forced to play what the producers wanted. The great bands where great before they had contracts with the music monsters and they’d still be great without them. There’s hundreds maybe thousands of really great bands out there that have failed or will fail because they couldn’t find favor with the music mafia.

    Its obvious this dinosaur doesn’t belong in the 21st century. It can’t stand by itself it has to leech off its customers. Making us pay more for equipment to “protect” their profits. Forcing taxpayers to fund a digital police force and making criminals out of everyone. Now they think they should destroy computers because they cant secure their property. Destroy the music industry is more like it. Let it die and allow a new way to develop. It is brain dead we should just pull the plug.

    Never happen I know. people just have to buy new CDs…but it’s a thought
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

  9. #39
    AO Security for Non-Geeks tonybradley's Avatar
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    Another irony is that Sony in particular has a division that is part of the RIAA and a division that is part of the MPIA. Their lawyers fight right alongside the rest of the recording and motion picture industry about the evils of computers and stealing copywritten works.

    Meanwhile, Sony's other divisions manufacture and sell the hardware and software to do it. They sell computer systems with CDRW and DVD-RW drives installed. They sell their NetMD mini-disc walkman and trumpet about how their software can rip an entire CD in half the time.

    They've got their hands in both cookie jars so they make money if people steal the music and they make money if MP3's get banned from existence.

    Unfortunately for the whole industry there is an underground and always will be. The only difference between something being legal and illegal is how far underground the underground goes.

    From Tiger Shark:
    I guess this really put a "flea up my @$$"...... I just posted the following on Senator Hatch's web site.
    Instead of posting to the senator's site, I posted my $.02 as an article on my site. Here is an excerpt and a link:

    It seems like an all-American concept- the 3-strike rule. Three strikes and you’re out is an integral part of the American pastime- baseball. Almost everyone is familiar with the concept.
    It has been adopted by the legal system to deal with repeat-offenders.

    Two offenses and you might get your freedom back. But, if you get that perilous 3rd strike you will be sentenced to life in prison without parole.

    If Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) has his way your computer might be wiped out on your 3rd strike too. On Tuesday, June 17 the senator commented that he would be in favor of developing a program to remotely destroy computers found to be downloading illegal software- specifically MP3’s of songs.

    Under the senator’s suggested system a computer owner would somehow receive a warning the first time their system was found to be breaking the law. The computer owner would again receive a warning the second time their system was found to be breaking the law. On the third offense, the government would join in the fun of breaking the law and play "uber hacker" to wipe the computer owner’s system out.

    Actually, it seems as if the intent would be to let the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) and the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America) do the uber hacking and Senator Hatch acknowledged Congress would have to create an exemption for these copyright owners from liability for damaging computers. Basically he would place the RIAA and MPAA above the law on one side so that they could enforce draconian law on the other.

    The idea of letting the RIAA play hacker stems back to October of 2001 when lobbyists from the RIAA drafted an amendment that they tried to have attached to the USA Patriot Act. The proposed amendment would not only allow exceptions for copyright owners to hack those who steal their works but was also intended to limit their liability if their actions caused any collateral damage to your computer above and beyond their intended target and deny the hacking victim’s right to sue the copyright owner for hacking their system.

    Lobbyists from the RIAA and MPAA have been very busy still. They are primarily behind the state Super-DMCA bills that are passed or pending in a majority of states right now. The MPAA is alleged to have written the bill and then lobbied state governments to enact it. In states where that bill has passed it has created controversy because the wording is overly broad and seems to imply that simple information security measures like firewalls or encryption make you a criminal (see Are You Breaking The Law?).

    Full article: Counter-Hacking: The Sequel

  10. #40
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    Tony ive watch you shamelessly promote yourself and your website (which by the way is against the rules here) for quite some time, but now you’ve gone too far. Your saying that you getting a case of verbal diarrhea on a web page, which none of us would see unless you post a link, is better than TigerShark writing his elected officials. That’s Bullshit!

    Why don’t you put that talent of yours to work and push for change (whichever way you want it) instead of repeating what many others have already said. Try writing your representatives too. I don’t think they’ve book marked your pages.
    Bukhari:V3B48N826 “The Prophet said, ‘Isn’t the witness of a woman equal to half of that of a man?’ The women said, ‘Yes.’ He said, ‘This is because of the deficiency of a woman’s mind.’”

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