Overclocking Celeron
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Thread: Overclocking Celeron

  1. #1
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    Overclocking Celeron

    I recently overclocked my Intel Celeron by changing the FSB speed from 66MHZ to 75MHZ this changed my clockspeed from 366MHZ to 413MHZ. My computer is as stable as before. But it's possible to change the FSB speed to 83MHZ, should my processor hold when I do that, or is the chance that my motherboard/CPU will get overheated to big?
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

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  2. #2
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    hmmm, im not sure about a 366 celeron, but i know someone with a 500 celeron overclocked to something like 800 or 900 with only a heatsink / fan, but he was using a newer board, but the celerons run at a rather low temperature compared to the likes of a P4 or newer processors

    if you put a big heatsink and fan combo on it the procesor should be fine, get yourself a mobo that wont have too much trouble dealing with the extra speed and some higher speed RAM and you have a relatively affordable overclock, i'll get the exact figures for you if you want about the processor he has just to be sure

  3. #3
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    Succesfully overclocking your celeron 366 to very high speeds (550 Mhz) will only succeed with a good core. You will need the S-Spec SL36C PPGA, some weeks cpu's are better overclockers. Depending on your mobo you will have more front side bus settings. Cause this is almost the only way to overclock those babies. It really depends on mobo clean signal / signal loss wether you can run stable at high overclock speeds or not. Trick is to increase the voltage sligthly together with your fsb. Caution: this will cause your condensators and eventually mosfets on your mobo to heat up. I have seen condensators blow off from mobo's... so watch out. It's not nice to have a condensator plugged in your head or a mobo in fire. A nice heatsink like an Alpha and a good fan like a Delta or Papst are not going to be enough if you want to push your system like that. You will need a very decent airflow inside your box to cool all parts and remove the heat from the cpu heatsink away.
    Beware such oc can damage your mobo and cpu, I'm not responsible

    You can search for good weeks and oc tips at
    http://ads.ad-flow.com/?DC=overclock...&TARGET=_blank

    If I where you I would google for my CPU core and week, google for my mobo oc capacities, look up condensator specs and give it a try if the risks / gains trade off is acceptable.

  4. #4
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    I'm using a Micro ATX LX9 motherboard wich uses the Intel 82443LX AGP chipset, the only way to overclock is by changing the FSB speed. The voltage isn't adjustable.
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

  5. #5
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    hmm, this will limit your capacity to overclock by pushing the fsb just that higher. With a mobo like the abit BP6 (I think that's the type, I'm not sure anymore) you can push the core voltage too. It's heavily advised to do that to keep your system stable, however higher voltages = more risks so try to keep them as low and possible. In your case, you need to up the FSB with small parts until your system becomes instable. Then go to the previous setting. If you can only choose between some fixed settings and no voltage changes, it's going to be very hard to get a heavily overclocked and stable system.

  6. #6
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    So I can just change the FSB speed to 83MHZ and put it back to 75MHZ when my system becomes instable. Isn't there a chance my pc becomes unbootable because 83MHZ is too much so my mobo or cpu will already be screwed up or will it hold long enough to change the FSB back?
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

  7. #7
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    Normaly it will either boot or not... if not switch off immediatly. Simple as that. If your mobo is really bad quality you can overheat some parts and damage it. Therefor today is probably not a good day to try, it's warm weather so a cool airflow is less easy to obtain. Summers are not fun for oc'ing . I pushed a 233 to 333 and it booted up but didn't run stable. I tried 83mhz with that mobo and proc but it didn't run stable.

  8. #8
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    Mmmm, so I'd better stick to not going further then 75MHZ, I think that's the best, I cannot take risks on buring my mobo.
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

  9. #9
    Old Fart
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    My 366 is running @458 using the 83mhz fsb (ABIT BE-6 m/b)......been stable for better than 4 years now.
    Al
    It isn't paranoia when you KNOW they're out to get you...

  10. #10
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    Yes, but you are using another mobo, as I'm only 15 I don't want to buy a new mobo, do you think I should take the risk of setting it to 83MHZ? BTW do you know my mobo? When I google it I don't find anything about it.
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

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