Installing Slackware 9.0
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Thread: Installing Slackware 9.0

  1. #1
    er0k
    Guest

    Installing Slackware 9.0

    Ok, I couldn't find another tut on this around here, im sure there is one, but o well. This wont cover the same things.

    Ive read alot of people on different boards wanting help installing slack 9, so ill go over a few things.

    First off, you have to get an iso. To do this, i recommend going to www.linuxiso.org, and getting the newest slack i686 or i386 version, whichever is suitable for you. To burn the iso, i recommend burning it on a linux platform, with:

    Code:
    bash-2.05$ cdrecord -scanbus
    
    /* this will tell you where your burning device is located and how it can be recognized by cdrecord. , we'll say it returned LITE-ON 0,0,0
    for SAG */
    
    bash-2.05$ cdrecord dev=0,0,0 -eject /path/to/slackware/iso
    This should take about 10 minutes or so to burn on a 16x burner, which is a good average speed.

    Now most of you, will be fine with getting your slack iso to boot up, however, another great deal of you, will not. This is where things get tricky.

    Equipment needed:

    3 BLANK floppy disks, a floppy drive, about 15 MB of free diskspace on a working OS, and of course the slack9 iso.

    Now, from ftp://ftp.tux.org/distributions/slac...slackware-9.0/ get the following

    1. RAWRITE.EXE
    2. rootdisk1.img
    3. rootdisk2.img
    4. boot.img

    Install rawrite, and its really easy to use.

    For windows users, just drag and drop the img on top of the RAWRITE.EXE icon, and it will ask you where do you want to write the image to, you tell it A: , if your floppy drive is A:

    Rinse, and Repeat until you have three fresh floppies, plug one in and reboot with the boot.img disk in the floppy drive, and the slack iso cd as well.

    Now that we are into slackwares boot prompt, we are going to press the enter key.

    This will load all sorts of modules and config stuff that you really dont need to read, especially if you need help installing slackware

    <little joke sorry>

    Anyway, moving on

    Now I dont know about you all, but for my partitions, i like to use cfdisk. some like fdisk, but i dont. I love cfdisk, you can read all about how to use it in my cfdisk tutorial somewhere on the site, and its called Using cfdisk, i believe, and i dont want to search for it.

    Ok.. so now we have our partitions setup, by using cfdisk or by using fdisk:

    hint: i like to use:

    /boot = 10 mb
    /swap = 1024 mb
    / = whatever the remaining partition allows for

    anyway... boot = linux 82, swap = linux swap 83, and for your / = linux 82 again

    Now type setup at the prompt, and press enter.

    Once in there, setup your root partition, your boot partition, etc..
    (which is really easy to do and very self explanatory)

    Now go to install source media, for the noob, i would recommend an expert install, for the expert, i would recommend an expert install. so we are going to do an expert install.


    An expert install is no different than newbie, except it takes more time. You are going to want to be able to make sure you know whats going on your machine dont you? I mean honestly, who the **** wants kde and all its **** clogging up your harddrives precious arteries when you could be running the most beautiful window manager in the world, fluxbox ~ see my tutorial on fluxbox to install fluxbox post slackware install ~

    Ok, if you are a web developer, make damned sure that:

    1. you dont install apache
    2. you dont install php
    3. you dont install mysql

    Its a pain in the ass to go back in and configure these whenever you dont need to do so, just download and install all that **** post configuration.

    Ok, so you've selected your source media, and installed it.. Good job..

    Stick a floppy in, and make the bootdisks, itll walk you right through it.

    Install lilo automatically, unless you have to set a bunch of stupid ass boot flags that you simply cant enter into lilo.conf once you boot into linux.. i mean hell you have your bootdisks already... made dont you

    Anyway, congrats, you have now installed slack9, and who thought it was hard, hell, that was all from my memory can you believe it



    View signature picture. If you need any additional help, i can write a supplement in this thread for you if you would like, just send a pm.

  2. #2
    The Recidivist
    Join Date
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    Really nice tut. Well thought out and explained.


    hjack
    "Where the tree of knowledge stands, there is always paradise": thus speak the oldest and the youngest serpents.
    - Friedrich Nietzsche

  3. #3
    Developer Extraordinar
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    Atta boy er0k, as for the web development, it wouldn't matter if they installed Apache, PHP and mySQL/pgSQL with the default packeage, but it would be the default install, na dwouldn't be up-tp-date.

    Perhaps I will do a tut on installing Gentoo when I get home fromm PEI. Nice work er0k.
    Come to UnError.com

  4. #4
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Good tutorial man. For me when I install Slack, I install it as the only OS on the system. normally I just use the slackware 8 or 9 CD and boot from it. When it first boots it asks if youd like to pass commands to the kernel and for this I just press enter because I dont have any RAID cards or things liek that. After it starts going youll see you need to log in as root. I thought this was odd at first but then realised "Wow, pretty cool security wise". The root password is random and prolly not something youd just guess so its cool. After this, I do like erok and use cfdisk. Pressing P to see the partitions, I delete all of them and then create a new one. I usually leave around 900 MBs or so for swap space and make the rest the / partition, then make sure its set as bootable. then I create another with the existing space of type 82 (pressing "t" allows you to choose a type) Then select "write" at the bottom of the screen and it asks are you sure you want to write to disk? you have to type "Yes" or it bitches and youll have to type it again. After this you exit cfdisk and your at a command prompt. At this point type "set up" and hit enter and itll start up. Now you want to make sure you do the things listed in order, I think addswap is the one after the help file but do that and itll format your swap partition, then either if you havnt already or should bow you can format the root "/" partition. After this is done you can select things you want installed. I TOTALLY agree with what erok said. Dont install things like he listed when you dont need them. Also I usually check for SSH, by default the server is usually added in. If your SURE you wont need it then well, dont let the server daemon run. (logging in s root and just killing the process sshd works too) after everything is installed you can set more options and then reboot. One thing I REALLY like about slackware (heh **** the stability I lik ehow Tux is in the text mode console in the top left of the screen) Anyway, I wasnt trying to add or outdo eroks tutorial, I just wanted to show another way of installation. Using either should turn you into a slacker in no time (enjoy that joke, this is the only area in a job you can be paid to be a slacker and the boss knowing and not caring....unless your a BOFH )

    Anyway, I already said this, but I wanna say it again. good tutorial, and I think its about time we started writing Linux install tutorials. We get alot of qustions about Linux installs so I think this helps alot.

    If Im not mistaken thres a red hat install, Free BSD, Slackware now, and also my SuSE one. If anyone would like to know how to install ANY OS Let me know, Ill write a tutorial. (heh I didnt have that luxury of a slackware install book so I did slack and Debian both without a book) For the most part its straight forward but can be hard for a newbie.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  5. #5
    er0k
    Guest
    Originally posted here by MicroBurn
    Atta boy er0k, as for the web development, it wouldn't matter if they installed Apache, PHP and mySQL/pgSQL with the default packeage, but it would be the default install, na dwouldn't be up-tp-date.

    Perhaps I will do a tut on installing Gentoo when I get home fromm PEI. Nice work er0k.
    umm yeah that and they arent compiled to be your-host-specific and to what you need .

    Originally posted here by gore
    Good tutorial man. For me when I install Slack, I install it as the only OS on the system. normally I just use the slackware 8 or 9 CD and boot from it. When it first boots it asks if youd like to pass commands to the kernel and for this I just press enter because I dont have any RAID cards or things liek that. After it starts going youll see you need to log in as root. I thought this was odd at first but then realised "Wow, pretty cool security wise". The root password is random and prolly not something youd just guess so its cool. After this, I do like erok and use cfdisk. Pressing P to see the partitions, I delete all of them and then create a new one. I usually leave around 900 MBs or so for swap space and make the rest the / partition, then make sure its set as bootable. then I create another with the existing space of type 82 (pressing "t" allows you to choose a type) Then select "write" at the bottom of the screen and it asks are you sure you want to write to disk? you have to type "Yes" or it bitches and youll have to type it again. After this you exit cfdisk and your at a command prompt. At this point type "set up" and hit enter and itll start up. Now you want to make sure you do the things listed in order, I think addswap is the one after the help file but do that and itll format your swap partition, then either if you havnt already or should bow you can format the root "/" partition. After this is done you can select things you want installed. I TOTALLY agree with what erok said. Dont install things like he listed when you dont need them. Also I usually check for SSH, by default the server is usually added in. If your SURE you wont need it then well, dont let the server daemon run. (logging in s root and just killing the process sshd works too) after everything is installed you can set more options and then reboot. One thing I REALLY like about slackware (heh **** the stability I lik ehow Tux is in the text mode console in the top left of the screen) Anyway, I wasnt trying to add or outdo eroks tutorial, I just wanted to show another way of installation. Using either should turn you into a slacker in no time (enjoy that joke, this is the only area in a job you can be paid to be a slacker and the boss knowing and not caring....unless your a BOFH )

    Anyway, I already said this, but I wanna say it again. good tutorial, and I think its about time we started writing Linux install tutorials. We get alot of qustions about Linux installs so I think this helps alot.

    If Im not mistaken thres a red hat install, Free BSD, Slackware now, and also my SuSE one. If anyone would like to know how to install ANY OS Let me know, Ill write a tutorial. (heh I didnt have that luxury of a slackware install book so I did slack and Debian both without a book) For the most part its straight forward but can be hard for a newbie.
    For the first part, haha sounds like one of those "if it works it works type things"

    For the last part yeah we do need to whip out more tuts ..

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    3
    A wise man once said, "To install slackware, make sure theres a convent praying for you".

    I use slackware on 9 computers, running a mix between Slack2, Slack8.1 (im still upgrading) and have a single comp running Slack9. Installations can often be intresting, but retrying usually fixes it. But well done, its about time someone wrote a tutorial becuase for people new to linux, its a very steep learning curve compared to other distro's, such as Debian or RH.

    What you might want to mention however, are the following tools
    /sbin/netconfig (need root)
    - quickly configures network settings
    xf86Config - for those that dont know, slack doesnt really come with anything better. So enjoy it.
    theres also pkgtool in /sbin - which manages your slackware install, addition and removal of packages.

    -Gwala
    Blah.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    450
    Ok er0k you won ...

    I bit the bullet and dropped Mandrake 9.1 and installed Slackware 9 and thus far I am quite impressed .... a few things are in places foriegn to me but slowly getting my head around it all.

    Got the D-Link 520+ wireless card working so I have my DSL connection back to full steam - but couldn't let go of my KDE, sorry, but with a ton of RAM, HDD space and cpu it kicks along very nicely,

    A few things though, anyone running Slack checked out/using Swaret (http://swaret.xbone.be./) ... great little application .... "swaret --upgrade -a" .. and goes away to your configured Slackware mirror and grabs all the lastest patches and updates for your system - I do like this one.

    Also on the security front, there are a few things to change on default Slackware install and found this site a great help - http://www.c2i2.com/%7Edentonj/system-hardening

    Anyway cheers from a new and happy Slacker - I would have made a post earlier but needed a few free days away from work to dedicate to swapping out Mandrake for Slackware and getting things back to normal - thanks for the tutorial it helped the process immensely.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    180
    Hello,
    I was wondering if the intall was any different when you have another OS on the hd like Suse 8.1? I just got my new computer and was going to transfer the slave drive from the old one to the new. I'm running xp on the new 80g hd and running the Suse on a 40g slave. Thanks.
    Freddy
    cybnut

  9. #9
    AO BOFH: Luser Abuser BModeratorFH gore's Avatar
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    Well, Usually its alot easier to install both OSs fresh. Not saying you have to but if you install slackware first and give it the entire drive, you can boot with the SuSE CD or DVDs and then it should find the slack install pretty easy like, when it shows you everything it has found during install, click on partitions and you can shrink down your slack install and make room for SuSE and then, well, I havnt dual booted 2 Linux OSs in a while but you may need to configure the boot loader, SuSE may overwrite the one slack installs and it may not, Either way though, last time i had a dual boot with SuSE Linux it did NOT overwrite it, Free BSD does this alot though but SuSE played nice. I just formatted my HD last night and put slackware back on to do some playing (which is what Im typing this from) Anyway, if you have anymore questions or want to try something else jsut reply and Im sure someone here will help. We do have a decently intelligent Linux community here.
    Kill the lights, let the candles burn behind the pumpkins’ mischievous grins, and let the skeletons dance. For one thing is certain, The Misfits have returned and once again everyday is Halloween.The Misfits FreeBSD
    Cannibal Holocaust
    SuSE Linux
    Slackware Linux

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    180
    I've spent most of my time reading here at AO and your right, there are many linux writes. I already have Suse on the slave hd. If I'm reading you right, should I delete suse first, then put Slackware on, then re-load suse? And, if so, I have B C wipe.exe on floppy, that should clean the hd, or is there something that's better, that's free?
    cybnut

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