How to Decode Binary!
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Thread: How to Decode Binary!

  1. #1
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    Post How to Decode Binary!

    Binary Is 1's and 0's, On and Off, True and False. It is the most basic of all lanuages. All computers use binary and all eletronic data is binary. Binary is simple to decode once you learnt he pattern. You must also know that all Keyboard Characters have a number value called ANSI.

    Binary Reads from Right to Left. Starting with the first digit equal to 1 you multiply each number by 2. Heres an example

    1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0

    128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1

    If the binary digit is 1 that means its "On" and we keep the cooresponding number, If its 0 it is "Off" and we ditch it. All the number that you keep you then add. An easier way to think of it is to times the binary digit by the cooresponding number and add them.

    128*1 + 64*0 + 32*1 + 16*0 + 8*1 + 4*1 + 2*1 + 1*0 = 174

    Therefore 10101110 = 174.

    If you want to get text from binary you convert the result to a letter using its ANSI value.

    01000001

    128*0 + 64*1 + 32*0 + 16*0 + 8*0 + 4*0 + 2*0 + 1*1 = 65

    65 = "A"

    01000001 = "A"

    Hope this helps a bit!

    I learned this from http://www.pcnineoneone.com

  2. #2
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    Nice little explanation on calculating binary....I tried the link but it doesn't take me to that site though, just to let you know.
    Carrie: Someone\'s definition of what constitutes cheating is in direct proportion to how much they themselves want to cheat.
    Miranda: That\'s moral relativism!
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  3. #3
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    If you type the link in manually it works...weird
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  4. #4
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
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    To encode binary you need to repeatedly divide by two and write don the remainder, starting with the right hand digit and moving left until you get to zero.

    eg.

    83 /2 =41 rem 1 => 1
    41 /2 =20 rem 1 => 11
    20 /2 =10 rem 0 => 011
    10 /2 =5 rem 0 => 0011
    5 /2 =2 rem 1 => 10011
    2 /2 =1 rem 0 => 010011
    1 /2 =0 rem 1 => 1010011

    83 encoded in binary =1010011

    Steve
    IT, e-commerce, Retail, Programme & Project Management, EPoS, Supply Chain and Logistic Services. Yorkshire. http://www.bigi.uk.com

  5. #5
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    Yeah, I figured that the link would work if you typed it in....I was just noting that clicking the link itself doesn't take you there.
    Carrie: Someone\'s definition of what constitutes cheating is in direct proportion to how much they themselves want to cheat.
    Miranda: That\'s moral relativism!
    Carrie: I prefer to think of it as quantum cheating.

  6. #6
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    When hovering over the link.. you get...

    http://PC911

    Otherwise, it's nice. You could have gone into explain the transformation of binary straight to hexa.. since we are dealing with base16 more often these days [well, programs decode it in hexa for us, everything still happens in binary :P]
    /\\

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    01001111 01110010 00100000 01111001 01101111 01110101 00100000 01100011 01101111 01110101 01101100 01100100 00100000 01101010 01110101 01110011 01110100 00100000 01110101 01110011 01100101 00100000 01110100 01101000 01100101 00100000 01100010 01101001 01101110 01100001 01110010 01111001 00100000 01110100 01110010 01100001 01101110 01110011 01101100 01100001 01110100 01101111 01110010 00100000 01101111 01101110 00100000 01110100 01101000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01110011 01101001 01110100 01100101 00101110 00101110 00101110


    ...sorry, but someone had to say it. *runs and ducks*


    Very basically, binary is "base 2" -- whereas the system you use to count is "base 10" )aka decimal). This implies that subsequent right-to-left digits increase the overall value of by increasing powers of the base, starting from zero...

    So, in binary:
    Code:
    101 = 1*2^2 + 0*2^1 + 1*2^0 = 4 + 0 + 1 = 5
    1001001 = 1*2^6 + 0*2^5 + 0*2^4 + 1*2^3 + 0*2^2 + 0*2^1 + 1*2^0 = 64+0+0+8+0+0+1 = 73
    Similarly, in decimal:

    Code:
    123 = 1*10^2 + 2*10^1 + 3*10^0 = 123
    (of course if that didn't work, it'd look pretty funny, eh?)


    But, CPUs tend to work in X-bit binary... a 32-bit processor basically runs binary numbers through it's silicon up to 32 1's-or-0's long... or decimals up to approx 4294967296 (2^32).

    ASCII, on the other hand, is the machine/system representation of characters in 8-bit-binary or 0 to 256 (technically older systems were 7-bit characters).
    \"Windows has detected that a gnat has farted in the general vicinity. You must reboot for changes to take affect. Reboot now?\"

  8. #8
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    Theres a better way of doing any numerical system

    ... | base^3 | base ^2 | base^1 | base^0
    cross multiplied and added together
    ... | digit one | digit two | digit three | digit four

    So for hexadecimal

    16^3 | 16^2 | 16^1 | 16^0
    becomes
    4096 | 256 | 16 | 1
    then multiply by position

    using 0xABCD as an example
    (A x 4096) + (B x 256) + (C x 16) + (D x 1) is 43981

    Common computing numbering schemes are

    Base 2 - Binary
    Base 8 - Octal
    Base 10 - Decimal
    Base 16 - Hexadecimal


    To do in reverse, you divide each position, subtract amount divided to nearest whole number, and continue to divide the remainder until you get to the last power (X^0) which is the '1's column, which hence becomes the position of your remainder.

    -Gwala
    Blah.

  9. #9
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    Who negged Limp that was not that bad of a Tut you should not of negged him for that.

    Whizkid2300

  10. #10
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by draziw

    ASCII, on the other hand, is the machine/system representation of characters in 8-bit-binary or 0 to 256 (technically older systems were 7-bit characters).
    <pedantic> Just to be correct it's 0 to 255 actualy

    255=11111111
    256=100000000

    </pedantic>
    IT, e-commerce, Retail, Programme & Project Management, EPoS, Supply Chain and Logistic Services. Yorkshire. http://www.bigi.uk.com

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