Partitioning for linux
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Thread: Partitioning for linux

  1. #1
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    Partitioning for linux

    How do you partition your drive for linux. Like 5% /var 45% /usr etc.... i hear it is unsafe to do like i do and only make a / /boot and /swap.

  2. #2
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    Yes, this is true. One reason being that I can easily flood your machine so that it generates enough log data to bring down the box.

    Because each machine has a different purpose, I can't offer you a "one size fits all" solution. However, here is a guide that should help you out.

    (/): 128
    ( /swap): twice the amount of RAM
    (/tmp): 500
    (/var ): 1/3 of freespace
    (/home): 1/3 of freespace
    (/usr): the free space that is left

    Hope this helps you out.
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  3. #3
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    Now I am just being an idiot here but first what version of Linux are you using that has great hold on how you should partition it. Now the next question is why don't you just let Linux partition it for you most versions of Linux will partition your Hard Drive for you.

    Whizkid2300

  4. #4
    Master-Jedi-Pimps0r & Moderator thehorse13's Avatar
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    RedHat will build a partition set for you and it will work fine. The reason I never use it is because I partition webservers much differently than say a workstation. For example, I would assign more space to the /VAR slice on a webserver and much less space to the /USR slice. Unfortunately, auto partitioning can't guess what your optimal partition scheme would be.

    Make sense?



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  5. #5
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    I would let Linux do the partitions for me less of a chance making the swap or root too small and having problems later on. but once you get a good understanding on how small or big you should make them. I think you will be ok

  6. #6
    er0k
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    dude, unless you are running a somewhat popular server box, dont worry about anything more than root (/), boot (/boot), and (/swap)

    Ive been running a server with that for 2 years now, and have never had a problem, with 90 days of uptime atm.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted here by er0k
    dude, unless you are running a somewhat popular server box, dont worry about anything more than root (/), boot (/boot), and (/swap)

    Ive been running a server with that for 2 years now, and have never had a problem, with 90 days of uptime atm.
    Very very true, although /home is also good to keep seperate. Then if you ever have problems and lose your install forwhatever reason you can still restore all your personal files.
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  8. #8
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    Hey thanks for all the great posts.

    As for whizkid's post i just think it is interesting to know how you would go about stuff without having to rely on all the "stupid-proof" utililties that are included with new linux distros. And for the record i was installing Slackware. But long story short i just want to know as much as i can about computers thats all

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