Newb Q about Telnet
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Thread: Newb Q about Telnet

  1. #1
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    Newb Q about Telnet

    Where can I get telnet? Or at least something like it?

  2. #2
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    If you have Windows, you have telnet, just go to run and then type in 'telnet'... as for Linux, someone else will have to help you or just search Google.

  3. #3
    Senior Member n01100110's Avatar
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    Yes if you have windows , like jaguar 291 said before , just go to start > run and type telnet. But if your using win 9x , make sure you go to settings and uncheck local echo.
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  4. #4
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    Re: Newb Q about Telnet

    Originally posted here by Cyanosis
    Or at least something like it?
    If your running a computer like XP you could just type telnet, the letter o, then type a remote host and port# (example) 127.0.0.1 6667, drill.hackerslab.org, or something like that... But if you want something else (such as something involving SHH) then I'd suggest useing putty. http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ and then there is xterminal and blah... blah.. blah. Really there are many if not 100s of clients and things you could use. How about 'looking' for them 'eh?! Http://www.google.com

  5. #5
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    To get to Windows' telnet, you can either type "telnet" at Run menu (Start->Run) or from a dos prompt (telnet antionline.com <port number>, for example). If you have a specific port you'd like to connect to, you just put in the appropriate number after the domain.

    All versions of Linux should have telnet as well, but it may slightly more tricky than Windows. Usually, you just have to open up a command prompt window and type telnet. But if that doesn't work, you'll have to type the entire path as well (typing: "whereis telnet" will give it to you). Usually, it's in /usr/bin I think...

    Hope this helps...

    alpha

  6. #6
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
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    Originally posted here by jaguar291
    If you have Windows, you have telnet, just go to run and then type in 'telnet'... as for Linux, someone else will have to help you or just search Google.
    As for linux, open a shell and type in 'telnet'

    HTH
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  7. #7
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    While the subject of telenet is on the block , Does anyone anywhere use telnet anymore other than in these hacking games ? I thought ssh pretty much ended telnet?
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  8. #8
    Senior Member roswell1329's Avatar
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    Secure Shell (SSH) is probably more used these days for remote login sessions than telnet for obvious security reasons, but telnet is still widely used as a tcp troubleshooting tool. I, for example, am an output administrator so I use telnet on a regular basis and it's ability to connect to specific ports to test network connections to print devices connected directly to the network. Using ping or traceroute won't tell you if a standard Unix print hub can make tcp connections to a device (ping uses ICMP packets, and traceroute uses a combination of ICMP and UDP packets), so the most available tool for checking those tcp connections is telnet. It's a great tool for checking if certain services are "alive" on remote machines, too. For example, if you would like to check to see if the SMTP service is running on a remote machine, try this:

    telnet your.isp.com 25

    If the service is running, you might get something like this:

    220 your.isp.com ESMTP

    A simple test using telnet. It is still quite useful. Don't ever enter a password while using it, however, unless you enjoy broadcasting your passwords in plaintext to anyone on your network who's listening.
    /* You are not expected to understand this. */

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