General Wardriving Tutorial
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 80

Thread: General Wardriving Tutorial

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    207

    Lightbulb General Wardriving Tutorial

    How-to Wardrive

    Wardriving: the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections
    to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or
    elsewhere. [techtarget.com]


    With more and more people going for convenience in home networks,
    or even business networks, wireless routers are seen more and more.
    Some people consider "wardriving" a hobby, others do it to prove a
    point (wireless just isn't secure!), and some just do it cause it's
    just plain fun. Throughout the tutorial, some mere basics will be
    covered on the art of wardriving.

    [list=1]What You Need:[*]Wireless network card[*]Laptop (unless you feel like finding a power source for your desktop,
    and you can fit it in your car.. dummy!)[*]NetStumbler (www.netstumbler.com)[*]Antenna (optional)[*]GPS reciever (optional)[/list=1]

    Before You Go

    NetStumbler Briefing:
    When you first open NetStumbler, a window will pop-up with
    a title based on the date/time. This is the window where all the
    located AP's will show up. If you have more than one wireless network
    card in your laptop, you'll want to go to the Device menu, and select
    the one that you'll be working with. Also, if you have a GPS reciever,
    go into the View menu, then Options. Go to the GPS tab, and change
    the settings based on your individual reciever. I recommend leaving
    all other settings where they are. Finally, the green arrow located
    on the top toolbar indicates whether or not you are currently scanning
    for networks or not.

    Why should I have GPS?
    GPS comes in VERY handy if you're wanting to return to the
    networks at a later time, or if you're trying to map out all the networks
    that you find. It's better than having to slow down everytime you find
    an AP, and write down the exact location.

    What's the big deal with antennas?
    An antenna is HIGHly recommended, especially an omnidirectional
    antenna. There are other tutorials out there on how to make one, cause
    honestly, I don't know. Most WiFi cards have terminals to hook up an
    antenna, so if you can get your hands on one, take advantage. It will
    let you get a MUCH better signal on the AP's, and detect them from
    further away.


    Drive Boy, Drive!!

    1. Place your laptop running NetStumbler somewhere in your vehicle
    where it won't be a distraction. Cell phones are bad, but laptops are
    definately worse!

    2. If you do not have an antenna, you'll need to be a little more
    cautious when driving around, because networks won't necessarily show
    up if you're blazing by at 60mph. I usually go about 35-40mph until
    an AP shows up, then I slow down to about 15-20mph. This helps me
    pinpoint exactly which home/business is running the network.

    3. You don't HAVE to keep notes, but a lot of times, it's a good idea
    if you plan to return to the network... or if you don't have a GPS
    reciever. Make a little .txt file where you can jot down information
    about the location, address, etc. Just remember, DON'T TYPE AND DRIVE!

    4. Be sure to save your .ns1 (NetStumbler) files, they contain lots
    of key information if you're ever to return to the network.

    5. When your battery dies, or you run out of gas... that's usually the
    sign that your wardriving episode for the day is over. If it was the
    battery, go home and charge it until next time. If it was the gas,
    you're just plain stupid then.


    Other Stuff

    DiGLE (www.wigle.net), a useful mapping tool based on input from other
    wardrivers nationwide.

    www.wifimaps.com, another useful online tool to post or view networks
    found.


    Security Talk

    First and foremost, this should not be done on any network unless you
    have full authorized access to do so. This is merely a tutorial, and
    not a lesson in taking over a network.

    Wireless networking is fairly insecure, especially in the hands of Joe
    Schmoe who wants to be cool with a wireless network. More than 75% of
    the networks you'll find will have the default SSID, and more than
    likely, the default router login. ie. Just about all Linksys routers can
    be connected through via http://192.168.1.1/, leaving the username blank,
    and using "admin" as the password. Also, any hacker can do his dirty
    work from the street using poor Mr. Schmoes's network as his connection.
    So who do they trace the deed back to? Not Mr. Hacker, but Mr. Schmoe.
    .. poor poor Mr. Schmoe. If somebody is computer savvy, they'll most
    likely have WEP encryption on their network, which requires a mere key to
    connect. AirSnort (a tool for linux) actually with break these keys.

    There's really only one secure network that I've actually seen, and it
    changes its WEP key every 40 seconds using a mathematical algorithm...
    why can't everybody have something like this??


    De-Brief

    If there are any further questions regarding WiFi or wardriving, be sure
    to post them and I'll have them answered as soon as possible!!

  2. #2
    rebmeM roineS enilnOitnA steve.milner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,018
    Wardriving: the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections
    to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or
    elsewhere. [techtarget.com]
    Although this kind of tutorial is informative, I would have found it much better if it had been written with a 'how do I protect myself from war driving' prespective

    Drive Boy, Drive!!
    I don't think this does you any favours.

    Security Talk

    First and foremost, this should not be done on any network unless you
    have full authorized access to do so. This is merely a tutorial, and
    not a lesson in taking over a network.
    Actually this is exactly what I read this as - a lesson in taking over a network.

    So Plastic, how do I securem my wifi, what is a default SSID & how do I change it.

    What can I do to stop people wardriving me?

    These are the questions & answers that should be in a tut, & if I knew the answers I'd post them.
    IT, e-commerce, Retail, Programme & Project Management, EPoS, Supply Chain and Logistic Services. Yorkshire. http://www.bigi.uk.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    442
    Maybe it's just me, but are there any legitimate purposes for this ?

    War driving has always seemed to be just a little too much like port scanning the whole net.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7
    I am curious about the legality of WarDriving? Does title 18 USC address this issue yet? Or has this issue been left up to the individual states? Does anyone know?


    "It is not the horror of war the frightens me, but the unforseen horrors of peace."

    Replicant

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    207
    How do I secure my WiFi?
    Just about every decent WiFi router out there comes with an option for WEP encryption, at the time, this is the best defense against unauthorized access. Find the option in your router setup and enable it. 64-bit is good, but if your router offers 128bit encryption, go with that. Also be sure to change your router login (an option in the router config). Enable a username, and choose a GOOD password. The ultimate security for a WiFi network at the time is not to have one at all.

    What is a default SSID and how do I change it?
    A default SSID is the name of the network given by your router. For Linksys routers, the default is "linksys"... "default" is a common default SSID, etc. etc. This, like WEP encryption, can be modified through the router setup screen. Be sure to change the default SSID!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    772
    In my opinion this guy doesn't have to be negged as it is a good tutorial but he doesn't deserve any positive either because it's written from the cracker's perspective.
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    442
    el-half > So why don't we write a tutorial on how to use sub 7 ? War driving is stealing bandwith that is not yours. Stealing is illegal. This guy should goto jail.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    207
    Originally posted here by The3ntropy
    el-half > So why don't we write a tutorial on how to use sub 7 ? War driving is stealing bandwith that is not yours. Stealing is illegal. This guy should goto jail.
    okay... I'm sorry that you guys don't understand that wardriving is the DETECTION of networks, not stealing bandwith. It's NOT illegal until you connect.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    772
    The3ntropy, Mmm, I guess you're right, this tutorial is not at its place here. But I think there are many members here that have read lot's of malicous tutorials, at least I did, just for the knowledge.
    How else should you know how to launch DDOS attacks, deface websites etc.
    The above sentences are produced by the propaganda and indoctrination of people manipulating my mind since 1987, hence, I cannot be held responsible for this post\'s content - me

    www.elhalf.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    301
    Yes it can be used for good purposes. Basically just securing a network. You dont have to actually jack in to the network but you could drive around find the networks that are open and then notify the admin or whoever else. Who knows you might get an incentive out of it. Wardriving (at least from my perspective) is actually only the finding of a network that spills outside of the building.

    PeacE
    -BoB
    #!/usr/local/bin/perl -s-- -export-a-crypto-system-sig -RSA-in-3-lines-PERL
    ($k,$n)=@ARGV;$m=unpack(H.$w,$m.\"\\0\"x$w),$_=`echo \"16do$w 2+4Oi0$d*-^1[d2%
    Sa2/d0<X+d*La1=z\\U$n%0]SX$k\"[$m*]\\EszlXx++p|dc`,s/^.|\\W//g,print pack(\'H*\'
    ,$_)while read(STDIN,$m,($w=2*$d-1+length($n||die\"$0 [-d] k n\\n\")&~1)/2)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

 Security News

     Patches

       Security Trends

         How-To

           Buying Guides