Help with Mandrake 9.0 install.
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Thread: Help with Mandrake 9.0 install.

  1. #1
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    Question Help with Mandrake 9.0 install.

    I just installed Linux Mandrake 9.0 and now I have a problem that I didnt expect. When I started my computer I expected it to default to the desktop (KDE), however, it just went to a black screen with the prompt for localhost login. I thought that was odd but I entered my username that I setup thinking that would get me in. Then it went to a new prompt that say [xxxx@localhost xxxx]$. I am not sure what to do, this pc is not in the internet so I didnt set up a password. I am not sure what it is asking for I just want to be able to get to the desktop so I can start learning some things about linux.

    Can anyone help me out with this?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    to start the graphical interface, type:

    startx

    that aughta do it

    prolly should clarify...
    linux uses the xwindow system to output a GUI... and it might not be configured. to configure it, type:

    xf86config

    follow the steps, and when you're done... you can start the xwindows interface by typing:

    startx


  3. #3
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    Hey thanks it worked

    Now one more question if I may. Apparently I missed the option durin setup to keep windows as the default at boot time. Is there any way to change that now. I would like windows to start by default in case someone else turns on my computer to use it.

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    yup
    as root run
    #XFdrake
    and in the options u will be able to select the defualt logon into window mode
    or when u are into window mode
    in configure menu select "mandrake control center" then there u will see bot try to locate the option there

    Mandrake R0xx
    guru@linux:~> who I grep -i blonde I talk; cd ~; wine; talk; touch; unzip; touch; strip; gasp; finger; mount; fsck; more; yes; gasp; umount; make clean; sleep;

  5. #5
    Senior Member n01100110's Avatar
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    Your computer is booting straight to runlevel 3. Runlevel 3 makes the system boot straight to the console. I can't tell you everything , but when you start learning new things about linux , youll learn that for your system to boot up it has to boot to a specific runlevel. A runlevel consists of certain functions the system takes care of upon booting. For example run level 5 is the default runlevel for the X interface. So to make your computer boot straight to your kde desktop you would have to edit your /etc/inittab file , but make sure you run as root. Im assuming your unfamiliar with the shell. So press startx like Plastic had added. When you get to your desktop click on username's home icon. Then in the browser on the top navigate to /etc/inittab. On the line where it sais id:3:initdefault. Click open in vi editor. Then change the 3 to a 5 and your system should boot straight to your desktop. heh , you can always do all of this through Mandrake Control Center , but it's better you have a look at the file yourself. Well i hope i helped you in some way or another , but until then enjoy linux..
    "Serenity is not the absence of conflict, but the ability to cope with it."

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    Thanks for the tips. I browsed to the file you mentioned but I could not find the vi editior you mentioned anywhere, however, I did make the change from the control center. Now I have a problem shutting down. It goes to the same black screen with prompt and I have to manually my laptop off with the power button

    Any tips for this?

  7. #7
    Senior Member n01100110's Avatar
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    Yep , when you logout and it goes back to the black screen , type shutdown -h now.
    "Serenity is not the absence of conflict, but the ability to cope with it."

  8. #8
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    Thanks a lot for you help but what about the vi editor? Did I just miss it? I looked all through the menus for it

    Sorry for so many questions but I downloaded the software from mandrake's site so I dont have a book or anything.

  9. #9
    Senior Member n01100110's Avatar
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    Yea , open the terminal so you get a command line. Then type vi (man vi for more info). How vi works is you can do vi file to edit it's settings. When you open a file in vi , Press escape then i. This puts it in insert mode so you can add to the file , well if you have permission so i suggest doing it as root. Then when you make the configuration you need , press escape again. then type wq. But i suggest buying a book on linux , because one cannot teach you everything.. Good Luck
    "Serenity is not the absence of conflict, but the ability to cope with it."

  10. #10
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    No need to buy a book on Linux pretty much anything you want to read about linux is on the internet just go to www.google.com/linux that will become your best friend. As for vi it may not be installed you can use many text editors to change configuration files. I personally like using vim. Ler's say for example you wanted to change your XF86Config-4 file to change resolutions and stuff. You would type vim /etc/X11/XFConfig-4 that would bring up that file's configuration. To change this you would need superuser permissions like being root. Then you press I that is for INSERT you will see insert at the bottom of your terminal. You can delete and insert text into that file, (BE CAREFUL) you are changing settings that you might not know how to change back, when you are done editting the file you hit escape key and it goes out of INSERT mode. then type W to write and Q to quit out of the VIM program you can do both so just type :wq and that will get you to start the learning process. Go here to read more about it. http://www.vim.org/

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