Associates in Programming or Networking?
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Thread: Associates in Programming or Networking?

  1. #1
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    Associates in Programming or Networking?

    I'm considering entering the Information Systems Security program at ITT. Would you guys recommend that I get an Associates in Networking OR Programming? Thanks!

  2. #2
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    My uncle is a network admin and he went to ITT tech but hes says sometimes his job can be stressful but he also says hes the type who likes challenges.
    Spread Firefox.

  3. #3
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    Valor,

    It depends on what area interests you more...I would try to learn both, however mostly likely than not, you will end up working mostly in one area (either Networking or programming)

    Cheers


    P.S.
    Just my opinion, netwoking is alot easier to master than programming. Anyone can learn networking, however not anyone can write "good" code. Programming to me is like an art.
    It's something that's innate that certain people possess. An analogy of learning programming I like to use with my students is:

    "Anyone can go to school to learn art or learn how to draw, however not everyone can become a Picasso."

  4. #4
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    My thinking on the subject is that during the beginning of the Information Systems Security program, a lot of the networking will be reviewed. I already have a fairly good grasp of networking concepts, and was thinking I could catch up fairly easy. Plus, in order to teach the majority of the ISS program, more emphasis would have to be put on networking, making sure the students understand it.

    I'm not as strong in programming as I am in networking, which is why I was leaning towards taking the Programming classes. I was talking to a student in the ISS program yesterday, and he said that there were 8 people in the program that had an Associates in networking, and only one who had his Associates in programming. The programming student was slowly catching up with the rest of the students within the first 2 quarters. I'm not sure of the programmer's previous skill in networking, but after the 2 quarters, he is almost on the same level as the Networking people, due to the amount of networking information being taught at the beginning of the program. Now the programming student will be on par with the networking students, and have all of his programming skill. Does this sound like the way to go, or the Networking route?

  5. #5
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    I would always recommend that you go with the programming option. That will gives you more opportunities in the work force in my opinion. I have friends who have already graduated college with a Computer Science degree which only included 1 networking class a couple of them are network admins.

    I think with the networking degree you will just be able to get an IT job, however, with a programming degree I think you could do either because I dont know anyone who is a good programmer that doesnt know anything about networks also.

    Just my two cents.

  6. #6
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    Valor

    It sounds like what you are describing from the feedback you received from your friends is that taking the programming route gives you the skills/training in networking and an associates in programming all at same time.

    Again, really what you have to decide on is what you think your area of interest is? or better yet, what area do you see yourself working in the professional world.. Because I could tell you this, programmers/app developers do nothing but programming and the "network guys" do nothing but design/implement/support and troubleshoot the network/infrastructure.

    As a matter of fact, these 2 groups are constantly "butting" heads whenever there's a problem. Programmers blame the problem on the network and the network engineers blame the problem on the software/application....And either group knows anything about the other.

    So, In summary,
    Choose the area that you see suits you best or think you may have more interest in and it always helps to know a little about the other..It'll make your life awhole lot simpler in the corporate professional environment.


    cheers.


    N1ghtStalker's

    programming has been around for alot longer than "networking" it is just recently that colleges are offering degrees in networking.

    "Networking has really only boomed with the introduction of the Internet to the public sector during early 90s...Therefore it took a while for colleges to creat curriculums in networking..

    HoweverI personally I agree with you that programmers are very bright and are adaptable to learn anything new...

    Aslo, although programmers are very bright individuals, I know alottttttttttttt of programers who know very little about networking,,,( and this is not due to their lack of understanding it) it is just that it is sooooo difficult to know everything..Networking is very very broad. It is not just your simple LAN and IP nodes...

  7. #7
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    Originally posted here by gunit0072003
    Valor

    Again, really what you have to decide on is what you think your area of interest is? or better yet, what area do you see yourself working in the professional world.. Because I could tell you this, programmers/app developers do nothing but programming and the "network guys" do nothing but design/implement/support and troubleshoot the network/infrastructure.

    As a matter of fact, these 2 groups are constantly "butting" heads whenever there's a problem. Programmers blame the problem on the network and the network engineers blame the problem on the software/application....And either group knows anything about the other.


    cheers.
    This is not true for everyone. I'm sure it does happen in some companies, but in others there can and will be networking/sysadmin people who have written and do know how to code.....as well as programmers who know about and may have done sys admin/net admin duties. Sometimes they even work well together and complement each others skills.

    I'd recommend checking out both areas and finding what you like best. Opinions are rampant, and none of them will help you be happy. You need to find what you like to do and decide yourself.

    I'd suggest you get a well rounded education of both areas since that will make you more useful than someone who has only studied one. It will also open up the most opportunity. If you are a dev who understands networking and system administration you are more likely to develop solutions that take advantage of all the options available to you than someone who is ignorant of those tasks. If you are a sys/net admin who understands code you will be able to write solutions to your own problems and be able to automate tasks to make your life easier. With a knowledge of both you will also be able to better work with 'the other side' making you more valuable, and everyone a little happier in the end.

    Take some time, get a couple of cheap boxes and a home networking kit. Build your own setup and see how you feel about it. Grab some free compilers and a couple of good books (pm me for suggestions if you like....) and write some code....see how you like that. It's better to waste $300 on a test environment that will help you make a decision sooner and that you will be able to use for practice for class work than to waste $7,000 and find out you do not like the type of work.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
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  8. #8
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    Juridian ,

    I think everyone, includng myself, uses the term "networking" so loosly today that they forget that it encompesses a wide range of sub specialties within itself...

    A network quote unquote person, can work in one of the following areas of specialties:

    1) Network Operations
    2) Data Communications
    3) Network Implementation
    4) Network Design/architecture (LAN/WAN infrastructure)
    5) LAN administration
    6) Network Management
    7) Network Security

    Of all these,the only ones I see you need a combination of both skills (and also not always the case) are 5,6, and 7.


    Cheers.

  9. #9
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    It all depends on what you do, and for who.
    "When I get a little money I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes." - Erasmus
    "There is no programming language, no matter how structured, that will prevent programmers from writing bad programs." - L. Flon
    "Mischief my ass, you are an unethical moron." - chsh
    Blog of X

  10. #10
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    Im structly speaking working for multimillion dollar fortune500 companys...

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