Can rip-proof CDs save the music biz?
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Thread: Can rip-proof CDs save the music biz?

  1. #1
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    Can rip-proof CDs save the music biz?

    I got a real good laugh out of this... Copyright protection has been tried before and it failed I wonder what makes these guys think that this will work and not be cracked.

    http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/ptech/0...ave/index.html

  2. #2
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    theres no way it will hold up. I bet it will be cracked less then 2 weeks after the first protected cd hits the public sales shelf. Time to break out the tape and markers again?
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  3. #3
    AO Antique pwaring's Avatar
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    It'll never work,. within a couple of weeks someone will have realised how to disable the copy-protection - just like last time something like this was tried.

    Besides, if they stop me ripping tracks from CDs, I'd just download the files instead through a P2P application. The record companies would actually lose money from me, so they'd be shooting themselves in the foot. I'll buy CDs if I like the music (I rarely download music, unless it's something that I really can't find on CD, but even then if I do find it I'll cough up for the CD and delete the MP3 file), because I like to actually have the CDs, so long as I can transfer the music to my PC easily.

    Besides, anyone with a little knowledge and the right equipment can just redirect the output from their CD speakers into the line-in port of their soundcard and use some cheap/free software to copy the tracks that way (in the same way that you can make CDs from your cassette collection). A bit more difficult than plain ripping, but possible - and there's absolutely no way the record companies could physically stop you from doing this, since the output from your CD player has to be available in case you're connecting it to amplifiers, speakers etc.
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  4. #4
    GreekGoddess
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    It's not just that, you should be able to make back-up copies of the CD's you own. I know, I like to make them for the simple fact that I have copies in my car (one of the biggest item stolen in thefts around here are the cd's in your car) and I usually keep the original in its case and don't use it until I need another copy. Maybe that's pretty picky, but for the money I pay out in CD's it's worth the extra effort to back them up and keep the original's nice.

  5. #5
    AO Antique pwaring's Avatar
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    GG: I like to do that to (technically it's illegal, but I doubt that, despite their recent strong-arm tactics, that EMI et al are going to send round the police to stop me), but it's a right pain for games such as Age of Empires. I want to take a copy of it to university, but obviously I don't want to take the original (in case it gets lost/stolen/damaged, as things tend to at uni!), but it's a nightmare to copy so I'll have to find some kind of crack for it.

    The problem is (at least in the UK, don't know about the US laws) that you buy a copy of the music, not an exclusive licence to play it for personal use (even though that is what the copyright text appears to imply). So technically even if you copy a CD to a tape (to play in the car, because a lot of older models don't have CD players!), you're breaking the law. Okay, so you aren't going to get caught or prosecuted, but it's the principle that's important here.

    As for copying CDs, I don't like every song on every album that I own, so I rip the tracks I do like to my hard disc (in a lossless format) and then burn them onto new CDs to make customised ones with only the songs I like. With a 5 CD player, I can have over 100 songs loaded without repeating any of them (nearly 6 hours listening time). I've paid for every song, even the ones I don't like (and the duplicates when you buy two or three compilation disks), so I think I should have the right to do what I want with them, provided I'm not broadcasting them to the public or charging any fee for them.

    Just my 2p.
    Paul Waring - Web site design and development.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DeadAddict's Avatar
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    Sooner or later they will have to accept the fact that no matter what they do to stop people from making a copy they will always find a way to get around it They are fighting a endless battle. and in the end the people who buy the cd's always win

  7. #7
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    nah it wont. they have amde a few cds like that and i have em burned already. lol
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  8. #8
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    Guess what, I still won't be able to buy CD's then. It doesn't matter how "Beefed" up the security on the CD is, I still won't buy, simply cause I can't.

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