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Thread: DOS Commands (Advanced)

  1. #11
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    Can anybody think of anyother "System Generated Variables" such as:
    %DATE%
    %TIME%
    %SYSTEMROOT%
    %COMPUTERNAME%
    %USERNAME%
    %USERDOMAIN%
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  2. #12
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    Here's an interesting prompt for any win2k Users, little Unixesque:

    prompt [%username%@%computername% $P]# && COLOR 0A

    Ends up like this:

    [jimmy@MY2KCOMP C:\nmap]#

    and it's bright green on black, get rid of the color arg at the end if you don't want cool goofy green hehe.

    kinda long for CMD users, but kinda interesting, expecially for remote admin via command line so you never get mixed up or something.

  3. #13
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    hey UpperCell where did you find out about those commands. I think i remember something like that back in the days of dos 5 (i think) but it was a long time ago so i may be wrong.

  4. #14
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    the color command was re introduced in 2000/XP. And "prompt" was there since i've used computers.
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  5. #15
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    Didn't Negative write a tutorial about DOS as well?

  6. #16
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    Another often over looked command in DOS is 'debug' which is basicly a hex editor. And echo which can be used to send messages & it lets you sort of copy/paste text from batch files to another file or grab text from these files. Example: Echo hello world>>C:\test.text. you can use this to make your batch files interact with scripts such as JAVA and VB scripts to add more functionality. Together these commands can do some interesting things. Anyways after the hex dump is done and a jpg has been droped a message appears useing the net send command. Commands like echo, rem, ::, those are ok for 9x but in NT based its hard to read but message boxes are cooler anyways.

    fully unzip the file below... then take a look at the code in notepad and then run it. Its fun.

  7. #17
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    ty
    c m i y c

  8. #18
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    thanks for this...
    stuff like this is always welcomed...
    Riya
    Now is the moment, or NEVER!!!

  9. #19
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    Smile

    Originally posted here by spools.exe
    Can anybody think of anyother "System Generated Variables" such as:
    %DATE%
    %TIME%
    %SYSTEMROOT%
    %COMPUTERNAME%
    %USERNAME%
    %USERDOMAIN%
    Hiya Spools,

    If referring to Win XP or 2K, I believe you can enter "Set" (w/o quotes) at the command prompt to get environmental variables for those OS. Redirect ">" to some text file to save (ie. set > sys_var.txt)

  10. #20
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    Re: DOS Commands (Advanced)

    Originally posted here by spools.exe
    NOTE: DO NOT edit any registry or boot files unless you know what your doing.
    That's ok, DOS doesn't have a registry so it won't be relevant if indeed this tut is about DOS.

    Unix style file- and directory- name completion
    Edit the registry and add/update these (REG_DWORD):
    So don't bother mentioning that this has nothing to do with DOS then, and only applies to the Windows NT cmd.exe ?

    BOOT Menu
    Edit CONFIG.SYS and try it out
    And don't bother mentioning that this only works in DOS, not the windows NT systems you needed for the previous thing to work?

    System Generated Variables
    %DATE%
    %TIME%
    %SYSTEMROOT%
    %COMPUTERNAME%
    %USERNAME%
    %USERDOMAIN%
    All windows NT specific? Nothing to do with DOS?

    So in fact, half your tut applies to windows NT, the rest applies to specific unnamed versions of DOS, you neglected to say which was which?

    Slarty

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