Microsoft tweaks Explorer to address ruling
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Thread: Microsoft tweaks Explorer to address ruling

  1. #1
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    Microsoft tweaks Explorer to address ruling

    Microsoft is moving ahead with what it calls "modest changes" to Windows and Internet Explorer as a result of the patent suit brought against it by Eolas Technologies.
    On Tuesday, the company released the changes to the Windows operating system and the Explorer browser. It also launched a Web site offering advice to Web developers who use the browser to design their own sites and applications and who work with tools from companies including Apple Computer, Macromedia and RealNetworks.

    In August, a federal court in Chicago ruled that Microsoft must pay $521 million to Eolas and the University of California after finding that Internet Explorer infringed on a patent related to plug-in technology. The university owns the patent, which it licensed to Eolas in 1994. Although Eolas suggested that Microsoft pay licensing fees related to the disputed patent, the giant software maker decided to alter the browser while it continues to appeal the court's decision.

    "This ruling affects more than just Microsoft; it affects a broad array of partners and customers--including companies that many would view as competitors," Michael Wallent, general manager of the Windows Client Platform at Microsoft, said in a statement. "Microsoft has been very proactive in reaching out to this group to develop steps that will reduce or eliminate the ruling's impact on consumers and other companies, even as we appeal it."

    The alterations proposed by the Redmond, Wash., company include changes to the manner in which Explorer handles some Web pages that use ActiveX Controls, object-oriented programming technologies and tools found in plug-in software such as Macromedia's Flash, Apple's QuickTime, and RealNetworks' RealOne. Microsoft said it expects to make the changes to Explorer by early 2004.

    If Web developers choose not to implement Microsoft's recommended changes, visitors to their sites may see a pop-up box informing them of such before Explorer will load any affected plug-in software. Microsoft also said it was working with partners to create guidelines for building Web pages making use of the pop-up box unnecessary.

    Since plug-ins are also a key feature of other Web browsers, it is thought that the Eolas decision could affect other vendors such as Opera Software and contributors to open-source groups like Mozilla.org. Other potential targets include companies that redistribute open-source browser software or base products on such programs including Red Hat, SuSE Linux, Apple and Hewlett-Packard.

    SOURCE/MORE/LINKS(http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1104_2-5087787.html)
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  2. #2
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    Another article in regards to this from another site.

    REDMOND, Washington (AP) -- Microsoft Corp. said it will make technical adjustments to its Web browsing software as a result of an August ruling that the software giant infringed on a patent licensed by Eolas Technologies Inc.

    Microsoft, which is appealing the ruling and the $520 million federal jury award to Eolas, said Monday the changes will be built into new shipments of Internet Explorer -- which comes with the Windows operating system -- starting next year.
    Source: CNN
    t.e.k.n.o.

  3. #3
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    Why would they sue an open source company? They make no money off their software really, not to mention they're much less frequently used. Oh corporate greed....

  4. #4
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    Why would they sue an open source company? They make no money off their software really, not to mention they're much less frequently used. Oh corporate greed....
    Is it ok to rob a bank and then give the money away keeping none for yourself? Of course not. Same deal here, these types of lawsuits keep organizations in check. And just because you don't make a profit doesn't mean it is ok to steal, because the act of giving it away for free infringes on the developers abaility to sell a product based on the same technology, which they developed.

    catch

  5. #5
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    "Is it ok to rob a bank and then give the money away keeping none for yourself"

    for sure , robin hood was a better man than most
    Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
    The international ban against torturing prisoners of war does not necessarily apply to suspects detained in America\'s war on terror, Attorney General John Ashcroft told a Senate oversight committee
    -- true colors revealed, a brown shirt and jackboots

  6. #6
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    Originally posted here by lumpyporridge
    "Is it ok to rob a bank and then give the money away keeping none for yourself"

    for sure , robin hood was a better man than most
    Robin Hood is as fictional as that logic.

    catch

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